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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

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GENOMICS


Study: Genes may determine whether you like taste of alcohol
LiveScience
Whether or not you like the taste of alcohol may be in your genes, new research suggests. In the study, people with one version of a bitterness taste receptor gene said they found an alcoholic drink to be less bitter-tasting than those with a different version of the gene, according to the findings published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Researchers: Malaria severity influenced by 5 human genes
Medical News Today
Writing in the journal Nature Genetics, the team, including Dr. Sarah Dunstan of The Nossal Institute of Global Health at the University of Melbourne in Australia, reports how it found five genes that have a complex role in either protecting or making people more susceptible to severe malaria.
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Poverty's vicious cycle can affect our genes
The Wall Street Journal
From the inside, nothing in the world feels more powerful than our impulse to care for helpless children. But new research shows that caring for children may actually be even more powerful than it feels. It may not just influence children's lives — it may even shape their genes. As you might expect, the genomic revolution has completely transformed the nature/nurture debate.
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Jumping genes vs. repressor genes: Never-ending struggle shaped human genome
Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
Nietzsche had no idea how right he was, but then he knew nothing of the genome’s internal struggles. One of these struggles, it turns out, has had no less a consequence than distinguishing the human genome from the genomes of other primates. This struggle, to get to the point, is that which is between the genes that would jump — viral remnants known as retrotransposons — and the genes that would repress them.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Genomic entrepreneurs promise to personalize medicine
Medscape
The era of personalized medicine continues to advance with the introduction of products that can analyze genes, developers report. "Eventually, everyone will have their genome sequenced," said Reid Robison, M.D., MBA, from Tute Genomics. "Imagine a world in which your medical care is 100 percent unique. Every diagnosis, every medication, every dietary guideline can be tailored to you and only you."
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University of Liverpool awarded $33.5M to build personalized medicine incubator space
GenomeWeb
The University of Liverpool said that it has been awarded $33.5 million to build an incubator space for small and medium-sized businesses operating in the personalized medicine arena.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Curry power: Turmeric compound boosts growth of brain's stem cells
Newsweek
Scientists have found that a chemical component of the spice turmeric — commonly used in Indian cuisine and curries — increases the regeneration of new neurons in cell cultures and in lab rats. As with other organs, the brain has a pretty impressive ability to repair itself, and neural stem cells offer one avenue to healing.
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Tonsil stem cells may help repair liver damage without surgery
Fox News
Scientists have found a new, non-surgical way to repair a damaged liver by using stem cells from tonsils, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, involved tonsil-derived stem cells compressed into a heat-sensitive liquid that turned to biodegradable, 3-D gel at body temperature.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Health IT: Friend to emerging medical technology companies
InformationWeek
Medical technology companies can fill the gap between hospitals, physicians, insurers and manufacturers to improve the customer experience during this time of regulatory turmoil. The prevalence of wellness and sickness care in our society has fostered continued growth in the healthcare sector.
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Medical technology advances welcomed by doctors, patients
HNGN
A survey conducted by WedMD and Medscape researchers revealed that doctors and patients are more open to using medical technology. "While data shows clear differences between patients and doctors in certain areas, most noticeably around who owns medical records, the two groups are coming ever closer in their embrace of new technology in medical practice," said Dr. Eric Topol, Chief Academic Officer of Scripps Health and Editor-in-Chief of Medscape.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade.

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Schizophrenia 'made up of 8 specific genetic disorders'
Medical News Today
Past studies have indicated that rather than being a single disease, schizophrenia is a collection of different disorders.

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Mutations in gene linked to brain development 'may be a cause of autism'
Medical News Today
Rates of autism have increased significantly in recent years, with 1 in 68 children in the U.S. diagnosed with the disorder, compared with 1 in 150 back in 2000.

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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA: Noninvasive devices may help migraines
HealthDay News via WebMD
Two new prescription devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may provide some relief for people with migraine headaches who don't tolerate migraine medications well, according to a new study.
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FDA cracks down on unproven Ebola cures
TIME
On Sept. 23, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter to Rima Laibow and Ralph Fucetola of Natural Solutions Foundation informing them that the company’s products, including Silver Sol Nano Silver and High Potency CBD Hemp Oil, which are marketed as Ebola treatments, violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Survey: ACOs aren't using m-health
mHealthNews
A new survey indicates many of the nation's accountable care organizations are not using m-health or telehealth tools, and that challenges with HIT integration could endanger the future of the ACO movement. The survey, conducted by Premier and the e-health Initiative, found that many ACOs are facing challenges that affect care coordination, patient engagement, physician payment and control adjudication, population health management and quality measurement.
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House bill would allow ACOs to expand use of telehealth services
iHealthBeat
Two lawmakers have introduced a bill that aims to improve the accountable care organization model in part by allowing ACOs to expand telehealth services, Becker's Hospital Review's "Health IT & CIO Review" reports.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade. After five consecutive years of low growth rates, we can expect health spending rates to increase by 5.6 percent for 2014 and an average of 6 percent in the years 2015-23. Traditionally, healthcare spending tracks with economic growth, but the aging baby boomers and increased insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act are also expected to contribute to growth, which will result in the health share of GDP rising to nearly one-fifth of the nation's economy by 2023.
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Health insurers flock and flee Obamacare
U.S. News & World Report
As the government prepares for the next season in which Americans can sign-up for new health insurance, shifts in available plans are likely to cause prices to fluctuate. Thanks to the shifting marketplace, those who do their homework could be rewarded. During open enrollment, from Nov. 15 to Feb. 15, Americans can shop for health insurance plans online, using state or federal websites that provide tax breaks to those who qualify.
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Health law coverage expansion gets tougher
The Wall Street Journal
A nationwide effort to enroll consumers in health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is getting under way, and it is even more complicated than it was in the first year. Insurance companies, states and the Obama administration have two missions for the law's second major enrollment period. They want to draw millions of new, harder-to-attract enrollees to the law's insurance exchanges, while also ensuring that existing customers retain their health plans for 2015. Marketplaces are scheduled to open for enrollment Nov. 15.
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FAST FACTS
"A large percentage of foodborne disease outbreaks are spread by contaminated hands. Appropriate hand washing practices can reduce the risk of foodborne illness and other infections."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Mutations in gene linked to brain development 'may be a cause of autism' (Medical News Today)
Battling superbugs with gene-editing system (Phys.org)
Modifying your genes could modify your future fitness (The Globe and Mail)
How technology is going to disrupt healthcare (Forbes)
Treating migraines: More ways to fight the pain (FDA.gov)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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