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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Join the nation's top consulting experts on Oct. 3rd, 12-1 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar exploring the impact of the ACA on U.S. Hospitals and what organizations can do to prepare for the changes.
Click here to register.

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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Study: Immune response determined by our genes
Medical News Today
Scientists say they have found evidence that suggests genetics play a role in immune response, affecting our ability to fight off disease. This is according to a study published in the journal Cell. A team of international researchers involved in the SardiNIA Study of Aging, led by Franceso Cucca, director of the National Research Council's Institute of Genetic and Biomedical Research in Italy, analyzed around 8.2 million gene variants in blood samples taken from 1,629 Sardinians.
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Leukemia cells are addicted to healthy genes
ScienceDaily
What keeps leukemia cells alive almost forever, able to continue dividing endlessly and aggressively? New research at the Weizmann Institute suggests that, in around a quarter of all leukemias, the cancer cells rely on an internal "balance of terror" to keep going. When one version of a certain gene is mutated, it becomes a cancer-promoting gene — an oncogene.
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Epigenetics: Are genes the new brains?
Discover Magazine
It's an excellent piece about epigenetics and gene expression — the process by which particular parts of our DNA are "switched on," or off, within cells: Genes can vary their level of activity, as if controlled by dimmer switches. Most cells in your body contain every one of your 22,000 or so genes. But in any given cell at any given time, only a tiny percentage of those genes are active.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Healthcare CIOs need personalized medicine
InformationWeek
Aided by big data and cloud computing, "personalized medicine" is enabling doctors and researchers to evaluate the potential of existing drugs in different individuals and make better clinical decisions. One of the best selling prescription drugs in the world is Clopidogrel, mostly selling under the trade name Plavix. Clopidogrel is prescribed to most patients with risk of blood clots, and to all patients receiving a stent.
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Advanced genetic testing paves way for personalized medicine
Dermatology Times
New genetic testing methods may not only help identify the potential risk for individuals to develop certain diseases but may also open the door for more targeted therapies and management strategies, which could be of particular benefit in higher risk patient populations.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Scientists can now extract stem cells from brains using magnets
Gizmodo
Nothing about how a bunch of Oxford researchers recently pulled neural stem cells out of the brains of living rats seems feasible. The cells are hard to isolate. Brains are fragile. Okay, brains are very fragile. But they've done it, and the procedure could shed fresh light on diseases like Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Stem cells may prevent tissue rejection in breast reconstruction surgery
CBS News
Scientists are reporting breast reconstruction surgery may be improved by adding stem cells and fat to the procedure. A new study published in The Lancet found the technique was superior to typical reconstruction surgeries that use only fat grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why medicine will be more like Wal-Mart (MIT Technology Review)
Genes associated with autism are surprisingly large (Scientific American)
Gene that triggers 'memory extinction' discovered (Medical News Today)
Personalized medicine may be good for patients but bad for drug companies' bottom line (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


US doctors are doing 'virtual surgery' in Syria
iMedicalApps
The Union of Syrian Medical Relief Organizations is connecting U.S. doctors with their Syrian counterparts in order to assist them with the ever-increasing medical needs created by the war in their country which has left over 100,000 dead. This process has been made possible via secret Skype sessions. Voice of America was recently given access to one such session in which a 19-year-old with periphery nerve damage as a result of a shot to the leg was receiving surgery.
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Doctors foresee a Google Glass view of surgeries
The Boston Globe
One morning in June, several students at Eastern Maine Medical Center huddled around an iPad, watching a live video of a surgical procedure. In a nearby operating room, trauma surgeon Rafael Grossman was on the business end of the video feed. The camera man? Grossman himself. The surgeon recorded the procedure using Google Glass, the wearable computer and video camera mounted on a pair of lightweight eyeglass frames.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Immune response determined by our genes
Medical News Today
Scientists say they have found evidence that suggests genetics play a role in immune response, affecting our ability to fight off disease.

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Poverty can trump a winning hand of genes
The Wall Street Journal
We all notice that some people are smarter than others. You might naturally wonder how much these differences in intelligence depend on genes or upbringing.

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New prosthetic: Man controls bionic leg with thoughts
Live Science
A 32-year-old man who lost his leg below the knee after a motorcycle accident four years ago now has a robotic prosthesis he can control with his mind, according to a new report of his case.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Who knew that blood, sweat and tears could start a healthcare revolution?
Forbes
Today we're witnessing a massive shift in who will collect and control diagnostic and other health information. For the first time, as people and patients, we will have control over what we measure, when we measure it and who has access to our personal data. This is made possible by a new generation of revolutionary biosensors that contain the power of clinical lab instruments in packages that are light, small, wireless and highly efficient.
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How the government shutdown affects healthcare
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
The Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, is at the center of the budget debate that has resulted in a government shutdown. But one of the ironies of the situation is that the program will remain funded. It even reached a major milestone — the launch of the insurance exchanges — on Oct. 1, the same day other areas of government were forced to place employees on furlough. The ACA, as well as Medicare and Medicaid, are not affected by the shutdown. But other areas of healthcare, particularly those in the public health arena, don’t fall under the same exceptions and were forced into limbo.
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Dawn of a revolution in healthcare
The New York Times
The United States is embarking on a truly historic journey toward near-universal healthcare coverage. Starting Oct. 1, the federal government will make it possible for millions of uninsured Americans who can't get health insurance, or can't afford it, to obtain coverage with the aid of government subsidies. It is a striking example of what government can do to help people in trouble.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves 1st presurgical breast cancer drug
The Associated Press via ABC News
A biotech drug from Roche has become the first medicine approved to treat breast cancer before surgery, offering an earlier approach against one of the deadliest forms of the disease. The Food and Drug Administration approved Perjeta for women with a form of early-stage breast cancer who face a high risk of having their cancer spread to other parts of the body.
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FDA adds most severe warning to Pfizer's Tygacil
Medical Xpress
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday Tygacil, or tigecycline, should only be used in situations when other treatments aren't suitable. The intravenous drug is approved as a treatment for complicated skin and skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. The FDA will add a boxed warning to the drug label, its most serious type of warning.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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