This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit October 09, 2014
Advertisement
   NAMCP Medical Directors Institute   AAMCN    AAIHDS    Conferences    JMCM    Contact Us  

Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


Click here to visit the conference website.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

 



Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

If you are interested in advertising on the website or in JMCM, please click here.

If you would like a free subscription to the Journal of Managed Care Medicine, click here and fill out the form.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


GENOMICS


Scientists identify more than 400 genes that influence height
Medical News Today
In what is the largest genome-wide association study so far, an international research team has found more than 400 genes that influence height — nearly doubling the number of height-related genes identified in previous research. The researchers say their findings, reached by analyzing genome-wide data from more than 250,000 people, can explain around 20 percent of height heritability in humans, increasing from 12 percent prior to this study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Genes can cause stress-induced weight gain, disease
Parade
Prone to anxiety, depression and just being ticked off? According to Duke Medicine researchers, that could make you hard-wired to gain weight — something that can cause heart disease or diabetes. About 13 percent of Caucasians might carry a genetic susceptibility to weight gain as a result of stress, the scientists say.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


From kale to pale ale, a love of bitter may be in your genes
NPR
The word bitter can make some of us wince. In conversation, we talk of "a bitter pill to swallow" or "bittersweet" memories. But if you're puzzled by the bad emotional rap on bitter — perhaps you even like the taste of bitter greens or bitter beer — it may say something about your genes. Scientists have been studying a particular taste receptor gene to understand why some of us may be more predisposed to liking bitter foods and hoppy beers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Measure, Monitor Immunoglobulin Treatment Outcomes
BioFeedback for immunoglobulin is a health outcomes reporting program that provides clinical feedback on the use of immunoglobulin in autoimmune-related disorders. Physicians and medical directors can now deploy clinical interventions when they have the greatest impact on healthcare quality and costs.

Request more information or schedule a personal introduction.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


The revolution will be personalized: An interview with 2 Stanford geneticists
BioPharma Dive
In 2001, the FDA approved Novartis' Gleevec for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia, a rare white blood cell cancer. It was a watershed moment. In the years since, physicians and scientists have come to hail Gleevec as a "miracle drug" and "silver bullet" that revolutionized the treatment of a blood cancer that comprises about 14 percent of all leukemias in the West.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found a new way to identify protein mutations in cancer cells. The novel method is being used to develop personalized vaccines to treat patients with ovarian cancer. "This has the potential to dramatically change how we treat cancer," says Dr. Pramod Srivastava, director of the Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center at UConn Health and one of the principal investigators on the study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Barcoding tool for stem cells questions origin of blood cells
Medical News Today
Currently, text books say the life-long supply of the billions of blood cells in our veins is driven by a small pool of multipotent blood stem cells. Much of the evidence to support this comes from studies of what happens following a bone marrow transplant. However, a new study by researchers developing a stem cell barcoding tool suggests this is the exception.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
What is Solesta?

What does a good day mean for your patients?

LEARN MORE
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the GBEMTI eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
MORE


Embryonic stem cells to tackle major killer diseases
New Scientist
Stem cells are getting serious. Two decades after they were discovered, human embryonic stem cells are being tested as a treatment for two major diseases: heart failure and Type 1 diabetes. Treatments based on hESCs have been slow coming because of controversy over their source and fears that they could turn into tumors once implanted.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Telehealth strategies for improving your healthcare business
By Karen R. Thomas
Telehealth is on its way to becoming a mainstream part of the healthcare industry. Telehealth statistics show that industries across the healthcare continuum — including home care, hospitals, accountable care organizations, behavioral health and more — are benefiting from using telehealth technology to support their clients, patients and employees. The big question for many companies, however, is whether telehealth is right for their organization. The following are some strategies to use when assessing how telehealth can improve a healthcare business.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New York hospital uses 3-D printing to save 2-week-old baby
HNGN
Surgeons at Morgan Stanley Children's hospital in New York were able to save the life of a 2-week-old baby thanks to 3-D printing. The child required surgery for its heart, which was full of holes and had a complicated structure, according to The Independent. The surgeons chose a more detailed strategy, which involved using MRI scan data to print a copy of the organ.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Scientists identify more than 400 genes that influence height
Medical News Today
In what is the largest genome-wide association study so far, an international research team has found more than 400 genes that influence height — nearly doubling the number of height-related genes identified in previous research.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Mutations in gene linked to brain development 'may be a cause of autism'
Medical News Today
Rates of autism have increased significantly in recent years, with 1 in 68 children in the U.S. diagnosed with the disorder, compared with 1 in 150 back in 2000.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves use of experimental Ebola drug
The Hill
The Food and Drug Administration approved the use of an experimental drug that has been hailed as one of the pharmaceutical industry's best chances at fighting the Ebola virus. Chimerix, a North Carolina-based biopharmaceutical company, announced that it has received approval to administer an antiviral drug called brincidofovir that has successfully treated Ebola in lab tests.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


As medical imaging moves from 2-D to 3-D, FDA rushes to keep up
The Washington Post
At the Food and Drug Administration, a small team of scientists is investigating how 3-D imaging — the technology used to create more realistic animations in video games and movies — could transform medical screening devices. The scientists are focused on early breast cancer detection; in a process known as tomosynthesis, new screening machines take low-dose X-rays from various angles, overlaying them to produce a 3-D rendering of a patient’s breast.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Next stage of ACO evolution: Bundled payments
FierceHealthcare
Despite the mixed results so far of Medicare accountable care organizations, a new issue brief from the Navigant Center for Healthcare Research and Policy Analysis concludes that the traditional model is here to stay, although it will continue to evolve.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ACO adoption of HIT varies
Health IT Outcomes
ACOs aren’t only adopting m-health and telehealth tools, according to a survey by Premier and the eHealth Initiative. Premier and the eHealth Initiative have released the results of an ACO survey focusing on health IT. These organizations found that, overall, ACOs are struggling to adopt IT and their adoption of certain types is incredibly varied.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30. The CDC and other key government officials have converged on the Dallas metropolitan area as contacts are identified and educated on signs and symptoms of the disease. As the story unfolded, hospital officials confirmed that the patient had told a hospital nurse of his recent travel from Liberia before being released from the hospital. It appears a few lessons can be learned from this situation. Unfortunately, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost — human lives.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Health plan cancellations are coming, but for relatively few
The New York Times
People are starting to get letters telling them their health insurance plans have been cancelled because of the Affordable Care Act. Because the letters will go out just before the midterm congressional elections, they are likely to get a lot of attention. There have been several stories this past week. But the people affected will represent only a small fraction of the population with health insurance.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Genes may determine whether you like taste of alcohol (LiveScience)
Curry power: Turmeric compound boosts growth of brain's stem cells (Newsweek)
Poverty's vicious cycle can affect our genes (The Wall Street Journal)
Tonsil stem cells may help repair liver damage without surgery (Fox News)
Health insurers flock and flee Obamacare (U.S. News & World Report)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Oct. 2, 2014
Sept. 25, 2014
Sept 18, 2014
Sept. 11, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063