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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Join the nation's top consulting experts on Oct. 3rd, 12-1 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar exploring the impact of the ACA on U.S. Hospitals and what organizations can do to prepare for the changes.
Click here to register.

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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Ethical issues as scientists peek into baby genes
The Associated Press via Today
Little Amelia Sloan is a pioneer: Shortly after her birth, scientists took drops of the healthy baby's blood to map her genetic code. Amelia is part of a large research project outside the nation's capital that is decoding the DNA of hundreds of infants. New parents in a few other cities soon can start signing up for smaller studies to explore if what's called genome sequencing — fully mapping someone's genes to look for health risks — should become a part of newborn care. It's full of ethical challenges.
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Study: Missing genes may be tied to development of autism
HealthDay News via U.S News & World Report
People with autism are more likely to have gene deletions than those without the disorder, according to a new study. The finding suggests that these deletions may increase the risk of developing autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by difficulties in social interactions and communications.
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Massive DNA study points to new heart drug targets and a key role for triglycerides
redOrbit
Open collaboration among global genetic researchers, coordinated by U-M team, provides strong foundation for further research. A global hunt for genes that influence heart disease risk has uncovered 157 changes in human DNA that alter the levels of cholesterol and other blood fats — a discovery that could lead to new medications.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Through molecular analysis, Virginia healthcare startup hopes to bring personalized cancer treatment to stage 4 patients
MedCity News
While many point to genetic testing as the major breakthrough for personalized cancer treatment, a startup in Virginia thinks that's only a third of the equation. "Genes tell you what could be and proteins tell you what is," Perthera Co-Founder and CEO Dendy Young said. "There's one more nuance: proteins may be active or inactive, so you really need in effect three different tests to put a picture together of what's going on."
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New diagnostic test for detecting BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations
ScienceDaily
The recognition of a causal link between mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer has intensified the demand for genetic testing. Identifying mutations in these large genes by conventional methods can be time consuming and costly. A report in the November issue of The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new technique using second-generation sequencing technology that is as sensitive as the standard methodology but has the potential to improve the efficiency and productivity of genetic testing laboratories.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Striking a nerve: MS stem cell therapies, the real deal?
MedPage Today
A review/opinion paper published in The Lancet waxes enthusiastic about intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cell therapies as a means to restore nerve function in multiple sclerosis patients. The timing is ironic. This paper appeared in the middle of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis meeting, where there has been little evidence that such therapies are even contemplated.
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Amniotic stem cells show promise in helping to repair cardiac birth defects
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the University of Michigan Department of Surgery have begun testing an alternative to embryonic stem cells that could one day regenerate muscle tissue for babies with congenital heart defects. A research-in-progress report on this new approach, which uses amniotic stem cells, was presented at the 2013 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Gene and stem cell therapy combination could aid wound healing
ScienceDaily
Johns Hopkins researchers, working with elderly mice, have determined that combining gene therapy with an extra boost of the same stem cells the body already uses to repair itself leads to faster healing of burns and greater blood flow to the site of the wound.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists can now extract stem cells from brains using magnets (Gizmodo)
Epigenetics: Are genes the new brains? (Discover Magazine)
Healthcare CIOs need personalized medicine (InformationWeek)
Leukemia cells are addicted to healthy genes (ScienceDaily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Surgeons get a 'flight simulator' for brain surgery
Fast Company
Surgeons at one of New York's largest hospitals will begin prepping for brain surgery with a computer simulation that bills itself as a "flight simulator" for difficult clinical procedures. Surgical Theater is an Israeli-American company whose main product is a computerized surgery rehearsal system which transforms patients' MRI and CT scans into fully immersive simulations; the surgeons then use scalpel-like controllers to rehearse brain surgery.
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IT firms must innovate better, says PwC
Healthcare IT News
Medical technology companies may be losing their competitive edge and are in need of a different approach to innovation in a new outcomes-based health economy, according a new study from PwC's Health Research Institute. The report also includes a Web-based interactive innovation scorecard to assess medical technology companies based on leading innovation practices.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Ethical issues as scientists peek into baby genes
The Associated Press via Today
Little Amelia Sloan is a pioneer: Shortly after her birth, scientists took drops of the healthy baby's blood to map her genetic code.

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Study: Immune response determined by our genes
Medical News Today
Scientists say they have found evidence that suggests genetics play a role in immune response, affecting our ability to fight off disease.

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How the government shutdown affects healthcare
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
The Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, is at the center of the budget debate that has resulted in a government shutdown.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Food for thought: How are you perceived professionally?
By Karen Childress
How you are perceived as a physician makes a difference. Fair or not, we’re all judged based on how we present ourselves. Being perceived professionally goes way beyond the wardrobe we choose, however. In many cases, how we are viewed by others is based on more subtle factors. Here are a few items that can impact what others think about you as a professional.
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The unsettled healthcare law
Los Angeles Times
Ever since Obamacare's stormy passage in early 2010, Democrats have been waiting anxiously for the program to go into effect and hoping that a dose of reality would calm the partisan battles over the health insurance plan. Once everything was up and running, they hoped, skeptical Americans would see that Obamacare was a good idea all along — and reward the party that brought it to them.
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Exchanges will raise US healthcare costs
Bloomberg
Ignore the inevitable startup glitches. The new health insurance exchanges will work just fine — in the sense that all government health care programs work: Many people will ultimately become dependent on them for coverage. That won't mean the exchanges have fulfilled their promise, however.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA issues final mobile medical app guidance
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued its final guidance on mobile health apps, ending a two-year wait for developers. The FDA, which issued a draft guidance in July 2011, said it intends to exercise its enforcement discretion and not regulate apps except for those that present a risk to patients if they do not work as intended. While some industry groups were happy the FDA made good on its promise to release the document before the end of fiscal year 2013, others say the FDA should have waited a little longer.
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Government shutdown halts FDA product submissions and other functions
PharmExecBlog
Planning to submit to the FDA today? Think again. The agency put a forced pause on key services and functions — and furloughed 6,620 FDA employees — as a result of last night's government shutdown. Stephen King, a member of CDER's communications team at FDA, said in an email that "no new regulatory submissions that have fees attached" — including NDAs — "will be accepted for 2014 until the date of enactment of a 2014 appropriation or a Continuing Resolution."
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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