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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit November 06, 2014
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NAMCP Medical Directors Institute Releases New Dossier Templates
The NAMCP Medical Directors Institute has simultaneously released the NAMCP Medical Technologies Dossier Template and the NAMCP Medical Diagnostics Dossier Template, which provide medical directors and manufacturers with a dossier template formats for either medical devices or diagnostics that accounts for evidence-based development approaches and unique aspects of each of these technology types (instead of having to attempt to follow drug-based formats that are often not ideal for these types of health technologies). NAMCP developed this format at the request of its membership because a consistent format for presenting information about medical devices and diagnostics hasn't been made available to the managed care community.

Please click here to download the templates on our website.
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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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If you would like a free subscription to the Journal of Managed Care Medicine, click here and fill out the form.

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GENOMICS


Can your genes affect your response to Ebola? That's the case in these mice
The Washington Post
Scientists have found a better way to study Ebola in the lab. When they infected a fleet of specially bred mice with the virus, they saw a range of reactions, from zero symptoms to death by hemorrhagic fever. By studying how different genes in mice change the course of infection, they could determine what genes make humans more vulnerable to death by Ebola.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Scientists link 60 genes to autism risk
CNN
Researchers have found dozens of new genes that may play a role in causing autism, according to two studies published in the medical journal Nature. Scientists identified 60 genes with a greater than 90 percent chance of increasing a child's autism risk. Previous research has yielded only 11 genes that had been confirmed with this level of certainty.
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Study: 2 genes may contribute to violent crime
CBS News
Whether criminals are born with an innate tendency to hurt others, are slaves to mental disorders, or are molded by factors such as childhood trauma, a history of abuse or too many violent video games is a persistent and complicated question. Now, new research suggests that genetics may in fact contribute to a propensity for violent criminal behavior.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


3-D printed medicines a decade out?
ENGINEERING.com
Low cost, personalized medicines could soon be readily available thanks to 3-D printer technology according to researchers from the University of Central Lancashire. The revolutionary technique developed by UCLan, which is currently undergoing a patent application, uses a 3-D printer to "print" a tablet of medicine with realistic quantities that can be taken by a patient.
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Personalized vaccine to treat ovarian cancer set for human trials
Gizmodo India
There may soon be a ray of hope for patients suffering from ovarian cancer. A personalized vaccine to treat the disease is on its way. Developed by researchers from the University of Connecticut, the vaccine has stemmed from a new technique that identifies protein mutations in cancer cells. The method, researchers claim, is all set to enter human trials and might soon be available for clinical application.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Regenerative cells: Hope for people disabled by spinal cord injury
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Stem cells have several unique properties that separate them from other cells. They can replenish themselves for long periods of time by dividing, and they are unspecialized cells that can differentiate into specialized cells such as nerve or heart cells. Spinal cord injury is one such target of regenerative cell therapy. SCI is an important contributing factor to morbidity and mortality across the world. But researchers are optimistic with the recent case with Darek Fidyka, whose recovery from paralysis may just open the door to a treatment of SCI that will get people out of wheelchairs.
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Researchers create thyroid cells from human stem cells
MedPage Today
Researchers have differentiated human embryonic stem cells into thyroid cells for the first time, according to a report here. By overexpressing two transcription factors — PAX8 and NKX2-1 — Terry Davies, M.D., of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and colleagues said they were able to induce stem cells into thyroid cells. They reported their results at the American Thyroid Association meeting.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  InSightec - World Leader in MRgFUS

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Breast milk stem cells may be incorporated into baby
New Scientist
Breast milk is known for being full of goodies — but could that include stem cells from mom that go on to transform into parts of the baby's body? Preliminary evidence has shown this happens in mice, suggesting it also does in people. Stem cells have the unusual ability to regenerate themselves and develop into a variety of tissues. Several sources of stem cells are being developed for therapeutic use, including embryos, umbilical-cord blood and adult tissues.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


FDA examining regulations for 3-D printed medical devices
By Renee Eaton
The official purpose of a recent FDA-sponsored workshop was "to provide a forum for FDA, medical device manufacturers, additive manufacturing companies and academia to discuss technical challenges and solutions of 3-D printing." Simply put, the FDA is trying to stay current with advanced manufacturing technologies that are revolutionizing patient care and, in some cases, democratizing its availability. When a next-door neighbor can print a medical device in his or her basement, it clearly has many positive and negative implications that need to be considered.
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Miss an issue of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief? Click here to visit the archive page.


8 innovative health IT startups
Informationweek
Startup companies are reinventing healthcare with new products that tap into breakthroughs in chemistry, manufacturing, biology and other sciences to improve the quality and length of life. Investors regularly gather around the country to review and fund many of these startups' dreams.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves Trumenba vaccine for meningitis B
Healthline
Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening illness caused by bacteria that infect the bloodstream and the lining that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. The bacterium N. meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis. The bacteria are passed from person to person through respiratory or throat secretions, which can be spread by coughing, kissing, or sharing eating utensils.
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FDA advisory panel gives tepid support to new Daiichi Sankyo Drug
Forbes
The FDA’s Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted 9-1 in favor of approval for Daiichi Sankyo’s edoxaban, but the outcome will likely result in a drug that will be on the market but that few physicians will prescribe until further studies are performed. Edoxaban will almost certainly become the fourth new oral anticoagulant to receive FDA approval.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


New CMS ACO model to promote accountable care in rural areas
Healthcare Finance News
To date, of the more than 330 Medicare Shared Savings Program accountable care organizations, 93 percent have been located in high or mixed population density areas, and very few Rural Health Clinics or Critical Access Hospitals have become MSSP ACOs. Thus, rural America has been relatively untouched by this major accountable care program.
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ACO gains in 1st years are 'promising, not overwhelming'
Medscape
Two studies on the cost, care quality and patient experience associated with accountable care organizations published in the Oct. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine point to moderate cost savings and gains in quality and access in the payment model's first years. An accompanying editorial by Lawrence Casalino, M.D., Ph.D., summarized ACOs' progress, according to these studies, as "promising but not overwhelming."
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Who would have health insurance if Medicaid expansion weren't optional
The New York Times
In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that a cornerstone of the Affordable Care Act — its expansion of Medicaid to low-income people around the country — must be optional for states. But what if it had ruled differently? More than 3 million people, many of them across the South, would now have health insurance through Medicaid, according to an Upshot analysis of data from Enroll America and Civis Analytics.
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The real reason you'll want an Apple Watch: Your health insurance will go down
Business Insider
If you're a safe driver, insurance companies will cut the rates you pay on car insurance. The same thing will happen for Apple Watch, this startup investor predicts. Apple Watch applications will monitor how you sleep, how much you exercise, and what you eat. If you follow certainly guidelines, your health insurance premiums will go down.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Here's how well your genes can predict your breast cancer risk (TIME)
Researcher: Study how genes work together (MedPage Today)
FDA approves 2 drugs to treat deadly lung disease (The Wall Street Journal)
House calls key to pioneer ACO success (HealthLeaders Media)
Predictive analytics seen as future of personalized healthcare (Health Data Management)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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