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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Join the nation's top consulting experts on Oct. 3rd, 12-1 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar exploring the impact of the ACA on U.S. Hospitals and what organizations can do to prepare for the changes.
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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

HPV can damage genes, chromosomes directly by inserting own DNA into human DNA
ScienceDaily
The virus that causes cervical, head and neck, anal and other cancers can damage chromosomes and genes where it inserts its DNA into human DNA, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. It's long been known that cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus produce two viral proteins, called E6 and E7, which are essential for the development of cancer.
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Researchers unravel genetic web to help target diseases
Phys.Org
Like a complex wiring system, the genetic network within a cell is an interconnected web of strands communicating to ensure the proper function of an organism. At Rutgers–Camden, computational biologists are slowly untangling the web to understand how all the pieces fit together. The work is a step toward understanding the regulation of gene expression, which can help scientists gain insights into genetic diseases like cancer. Genetic diseases are often caused by abnormalities in gene expression.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Scientists found the Wolverine healing gene
Gizmodo
Deep within our bodies are all kinds of genes that turn on and off over the years, including the very genes that make you grow a body in the first place. This is where scientists are looking for the magical code that could enable us to regrow organs and regenerate limbs. A Harvard researcher thinks he might've found it. George Daley of Harvard Medical School stumbled upon it somewhat accidentally, in fact.
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Coding variants in immune disease-related genes play only small part in risk for psoriasis
News-Medical.net
Coding variants in immune disease-related genes play only a small part in the overall genetic risk for psoriasis, according to a new study led by Anhui Medical University and BGI. This conclusion is strongly supported by their investigation on the contribution of functional coding variants to psoriasis in 21,309 Chinese individuals. In such a large-scale investigation, researchers only discovered two independent low-frequency variants with moderate effect on disease risk. The latest study was published online in Nature Genetics.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


The push to personalize medicine
U.S. News & World Report
Imagine arriving for your doctor's appointment with the usual stuff: your insurance card, co-pay and, of course, your genome mapped out on your iPad. You may not have to imagine it for long. Experts at the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow forum discussed personalized medicine, which involves looking at patients' genes to identify risk factors for various diseases.
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Is healthcare facing a battle of population health vs. personalized medicine?
MedCity News
Personalized medicine is fascinating. A world in which medication and treatments could be optimized based on our genetic makeup rather than the current trial and error system could reduce healthcare costs long term. Dr. Eric Topol's keynote at the Digital Health Innovation Summit emphasized that we need to move beyond the one-size-fits-all approach to healthcare.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Why stem cells need to stick with their friends
ScienceDaily
Scientists at University of Copenhagen and University of Edinburgh have identified a core set of functionally relevant factors which regulates embryonic stem cells' ability for self-renewal. A key aspect is the protein Oct4 and how it makes stem cells stick together.
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Researchers: Stem cells of obese women promote the growth of breast tumors
Study Hall via The Washington Post
Obesity causes changes in stem cells that can result in cancers growing more aggressively, say scientists at Tulane University School of Medicine in a new study. "Clinical studies have shown there is a much higher incidence of breast cancer in obese women than in non-obese women," says Bruce Bunnell, professor of pharmacology and director of Tulane's Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, and lead author of the study.
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Stem cell market: A rapidly expanding field ripe with opportunities
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
This report based on a bottom-up industry analysis frames some of the metrics characterizing the stem cells marketplace. The focus of this GEN Market & Tech analysis report is to characterize the stem cells marketplace based on the following classes of data, which we have been collecting as part of the industry analysis of this field.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Genetics field opens up with California ruling that 'natural phenomenon' can't be patented (VentureBeat)
Researchers find unexpected genetic mosaic in the brain (Medical Xpress)
New genetic testing method can determine whether DNA comes from mom or dad (RedOrbit)
Under healthcare act, millions eligible for free policies (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Telemedicine: Revolutionizing healthcare for soldiers and veterans
Fox News
Telemedicine — the exchange of medical information via electronic communications — has vastly changed the way deployed soldiers receive access to healthcare. And now, this new communication system promises to offer better access to care for veterans in the future as well. When Dr. Ronald Poropatich first joined the military 30 years ago, the digital cameras and webcams required for the use of telemedicine barely existed.
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Top 10 medical technologies
Today's Medical Developments
According to a new healthcare market research report "Global Top Ten Medical Device Technologies Market," the entire market for top 10 medical device technologies is estimated to be approximately $454.3 billion, of which medical diagnostic devices technologies alone constitute about 40 percent of the entire market at approximately $177.8 billion. The market for drug delivery devices constituted an estimated $110.8 billion for the same period.
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Why medical records should be digital and easily accessible?
MedCity News
For the longest time our medical records resided in a top secret folder doctors kept in giant file cabinets behind the nurse's desk and usually seemed reluctant to share with us. If you dared ask for a copy of your records you got an agitated look from the office administrator, followed by a dissertation on the costs you'll pay to access records for the service you just paid for. Many just threw in the towel and gave up.
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How mobile apps could transform rural healthcare
National Journal
When it comes to rural healthcare, broadband is a matter of life or death. Rural residents seek services from primary-care doctors and emergency rooms, which works if the patient doesn't have a chronic or life-threatening condition. But when they do, rural patients don't always have access to the most comprehensive care. Medical specialists practice in cities, leaving rural doctors to weigh the choice between sending a patient away for treatment — costing both the patient and practice — or keeping them in house, where they risk patient outcomes but keep the paycheck.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
HPV can damage genes, chromosomes directly by inserting own DNA into human DNA
ScienceDaily
The virus that causes cervical, head and neck, anal and other cancers can damage chromosomes and genes where it inserts its DNA into human DNA.

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3.5 million Americans have now had their health insurance policies canceled thanks to Obamacare
The Associated Press via Business Insider
Now is when Americans start figuring out that President Barack Obama's healthcare law goes beyond political talk, and really does affect them and people they know.

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UC San Diego gets $100 million gift for stem cell research
Los Angeles Times
Thanks to a $100 million donation, UC San Diego will be creating a new clinical center to study how the use of stem cells may help cure or alleviate leukemia, spinal cord injuries, Alzheimer's disease and other health problems.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


How big is the penalty if you don't get health insurance?
Forbes
Stories about the Affordable Care Act often tell readers that they'll have to pay a $95 penalty if they don't get adequate health insurance coverage. But, like a lot of other things I read about the health law, that's not quite correct. The penalty (which the Supreme Court said is actually a tax) could be less or, more likely, a lot more. It's a complicated story.
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High and low premiums in healthcare
The New York Times
The debate over the effect the Affordable Care Act will have on individuals and families who buy their own policies has mostly been waged in anecdotes. Supporters of the law point to grateful individuals who were previously unable to get insurance or paid exorbitant premiums but found affordable coverage on the new health insurance exchanges.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves aptiom anti-seizure drug for epilepsy
Medical Daily
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved eslicarbazepine acetate, branded as Aptiom, as an add-on medication to reduce the frequency of partial seizures associated with epilepsy, the agency announced. The drug is manufactured by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals in Marlborough, Mass. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year there are 150,000 new cases of epilepsy, the neurological condition of recurring seizures.
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Fish-skin treatment for chronic wounds receives FDA 510(k) clearance
Healio
The FDA has given 510(k) clearance for the marketing of a proprietary fish-skin, omega-3, tissue-regeneration product for treating chronic wounds in the United States, Kerecis Limited has announced. The product has been indicated for the management of wounds, including diabetic, vascular and other hard-to-heal ulcers, according to a press release.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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