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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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Save the date: 2015 Spring Managed Care Forum

Save the date for the 2015 Spring Forum being held April 23-24, 2015 at Disney's Yacht & Beach Club. More information will be available shortly.

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GENOMICS


There may be no such thing as a 'longevity gene'
Reuters via The Huffington Post
How do some people live past 110 years old? Is it superior genes, clean living, good luck or some combination of those? Scientists studying these "supercentenarians" said they sequenced the genomes of 17 people ages 110 to 116 to try to determine whether they possess genetic traits that may account for their membership in this exclusive club that worldwide includes only about 75 individuals, nearly all women.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Sex, genes, the Y chromosome and the future of men
Phys.org
The Y chromosome, that little chain of genes that determines the sex of humans, is not as tough as you might think. In fact, if we look at the Y chromosome over the course of our evolution we've seen it shrink at an alarming rate.
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Scientists use mind control to switch on genes
HealthCanal
Swiss researchers say they've found a way to use brainwaves to activate specific genes in the body, the first proof of concept of a technology that could be used in the future to treat conditions like epilepsy and chronic pain. Their study, published in the journal Nature Communications, used mice and people to see if the "mind control" process could work.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Population and personalized medicine in the modern era
The Journal of the American Medical Association
Classic healthcare research has centered on studying a group of individuals and then extrapolating the findings to the general population. In this context, evaluating the association between nonrandomized exposures and clinical outcomes can yield interesting, hypothesis-generating correlations, but assembling evidence to suggest a causal relationship has focused on testing the relationship between randomized exposures and clinical outcomes.
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AHA: Screening or treating to goal equally effective
MedPage Today
Screening asymptomatic diabetes patients in order to detect and manage coronary artery disease is no more effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes than therapy to reach medical management goals, researchers reported here.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


The big breakthrough in rejuvenative medicine
Hospital & Health Networks
Newly targeted immune therapies soon may enable clinicians to treat very large patient populations to whom they've had very little to offer before. But researchers can envision even more breathtaking advances in personalized care.
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Cardiac stem cell therapy may heal heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that injections of cardiac stem cells might help reverse heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially resulting in a longer life expectancy for patients with the chronic muscle-wasting disease.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  InSightec - World Leader in MRgFUS

MRgFUS is being used in clinics across America to treat uterine fibroids and pain palliation for metastatic bone tumors. It’s a completely non-invasive procedure performed on an outpatient basis where patients report an improvement in QoL within days, not weeks. Discover InSightec now.
 


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Patient cured of Ebola in Germany treated with biofiltration device
Fox News
A Ugandan man hospitalized in Germany for the Ebola virus was treated with a biofiltration device that the creators believe will change the landscape in the fight against viral pathogens. The Aethlon Medical team has created a device called the Hemopurifier, which works on the established infrastructure of dialysis machines already located in hospitals and clinics.
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New EHR vendors and technology needed for continued innovation
By Scott E. Rupp
In the span of the last five years, use and implementation of electronic health records in the U.S. has dramatically accelerated because of federal mandates and financial incentives directly related the meaningful use program. Because of these efforts, as well as time and resources invested by healthcare providers, electronic health records are more popular than at any point in the past and are now "the heart of health IT," according to research firm Frost & Sullivan.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Advancement revolutionizes hereditary cancer testing

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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Panel considers lifting FDA ban on blood donations by gay men
Los Angeles Times
A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services panel has begun to consider whether to overturn a long-standing ban against accepting blood donations from gay men. The HHS Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability heard testimony from advocates who say that the lifetime ban is discriminatory and that technological advances have made it obsolete.
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FDA approves meningitis vaccine after outbreak at colleges
The Hill
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a vaccine for a strain of meningitis that has infected students on college campuses across the U.S. this year. There are five main strains of the bacteria that causes meningitis, an infection of the bloodstream and lining that surrounds the brain and spinal cord: A, B, C, Y and W. The FDA has vaccines to prevent four of the five, but a vaccine for type B — known as MenB — was unavailable until now.
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Miss an issue of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief? Click here to visit the archive page.


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


CMS: How to report only once for PQRS, meaningful use, ACOs
EHR Intelligence
Providers participating in the 2014 Physician Quality Reporting System program may not have to submit their quality data more than once in order to participate in additional programs, CMS said in an email update this week. Certain individual eligible professionals and group practices will be eligible to report once on a single set of clinical quality measures that will satisfy some of the requirements for programs such as Value Based Payment Modifier, Medicare EHR Incentive Program, Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization, Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative, and the Pioneer ACO program.
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How ACOs can improve patient engagement
FierceHealthcare
Although Medicare's Accountable Care Organizations have improved quality and netted savings, they must improve their patient engagement strategies, according to a Brookings Institution blog post. Research indicates that ACOs are having difficulty raising awareness among patients that have been assigned to an ACO — in fact, some patients don't even realize they're in an ACO. So patients may seek care outside their network.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Compare the cheapest health insurance plans: bronze vs. catastrophic
U.S. News & World Report
In the state-run health insurance marketplaces, the government-approved health insurance plans are divided into five tiers: platinum, gold, silver, bronze and catastrophic. Analysts expect young adults to gravitate toward the bronze and catastrophic plans, which are the lowest-cost options.
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1st look at health insurance rates for next year is encouraging
The New York Times
Early evidence suggests that competition in the new Affordable Care Act marketplaces is working. Health insurance premiums in major cities around the country are barely rising. That’s the conclusion of two studies of data about newly public insurance rates. One, from the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health research group, looked at 49 cities and found that prices for a popular type of plan are actually going down, on average.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Gene for HDL cholesterol linked to longer life (The Washington Post)
New hope for Parkinson's patients in stem cell treatment (The Washington Post)
Should you roll the dice on a high-deductible health plan? (U.S. News & World Report)
Wearables market up 40 percent from 2013 (Healthcare Informatics)
What's a practice to do about an ACO? (MedPage Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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