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Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Single gene deletion prompts mutations throughout genome
Medical News Today
Jenga, a game with wooden blocks stacked upon one another, requires that players remove single parts from the whole structure, sometimes resulting in an imbalance. Similarly, researchers have found that the deletion of a single gene in yeast cells can put pressure on the genome to offset the imbalance, resulting in another gene's mutation.
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Aging erodes genetic control, but it's flexible
R&D Magazine
Biologists at Brown University have found a way to measure the effects of aging by watching the ebb and flow of chromatin, a structure along strands of DNA that either silences or permits gene expression. In several newly published experiments they show that gene silencing via chromatin in fruit flies declines with age.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Just 2 genes from Y chromosome needed for male reproduction
LiveScience via Fox News
The Y chromosome is often thought of as defining the male sex. Now scientists find that only two genes on the Y chromosome are needed in mice for them to father offspring. These findings could point to ways to help otherwise infertile men have children, the researchers said. Men with a condition called azoospermia, who cannot produce healthy sperms cells, could one day benefit from treatments based on these findings, they said.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


For some cancer patients, personalized medicine has arrived
Live Science
Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer death in the United States, and in the world, among both men and women. More than 200,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the United States. Each year during the month of November, physicians and others observe lung cancer awareness month, which sheds light on this terrible disease. To highlight the connection between lung cancer and smoking, the American Cancer Society encourages everyone on the third Thursday of November to quit smoking by participating in the Great American Smokeout.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Victoria Rathmill, 17, becomes the youngest stem cell donor in the world
The Huffington Post
Seventeen-year-old Victoria Rathmill forgot to tell her mom when she signed up to become a stem cell donor. But, hey, Paula Rathmill can't be too upset with her daughter — because the teenager is now the youngest person to donate stem cells to a stranger, according to Anthony Nolan, the U.K.'s blood cancer charity and blood marrow register. And she's all smiles.
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New cell therapy leading way to faster tissue repair
Military.com via Fox News
Researchers may be closer to developing a means of accelerating the healing of wounds on a battlefield, something the Pentagon has a keen interest in As early as 2002, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency put out a request for proposals seeking novel ideas giving troops a technology to immediately accelerate tissue repair for wounded or injured soldiers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Spanish team grows fake skin using stem cells from umbilical cord
RedOrbit
Scientists from the University of Granada in Spain have announced the development of artificial skin, grown from umbilical cord stem cells. The development could be a massive step forward for the treatment of burn victims or other patients who have suffered severe skin damage. According to a report, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, the research team wrote that they were able to use stem cells derived from the umbilical cord, also known as Wharton stem cells, to generate oral-mucosa or epithelia, two types of tissues needed to treat skin injuries.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Private website touted as interim alternative to HealthCare.gov (By Pamela Lewis Dolan)
3 technologies that will change the face of medicine over the next 10 years (The Motley Fool)
Genomics could blow up the clinical trial (MIT Technology Review)
Stem cells may let transplant organs avoid rejection (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


The 6 biggest innovations in healthcare technology in 2013
MedCity News
This year we've witnessed amazing innovations in technology with everything from wearable tech like Google Glass or Nike+ to the recent introduction of Coin, one card that stores all your credit cards, debit cards, personal accounts, business accounts and other cards typically filling your wallet. The healthcare industry was no exception to the rise in disruptive technology changing the way people are impacted. What are some of the most influential healthcare technologies you've seen appear this year?
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6 technology trends that will change your family's health forever
Fox News
When the Affordable Care Act takes effect in January, it will not only change the healthcare system but how we manage our families' health and our own. And as technology continues to evolve, digital health tools will play an even bigger role in how we stay healthy and fit. Here are six of the latest health trends to look for.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Single gene deletion prompts mutations throughout genome
Medical News Today
Jenga, a game with wooden blocks stacked upon one another, requires that players remove single parts from the whole structure, sometimes resulting in an imbalance.

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The dirty little secret of how to choose the best surgeons
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Someone finally figured it out. How do you choose the right surgeon for your procedure? Online reviews? Statistical data in which it's unclear how the data was collected and what variables were used?

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Scientists create 'mini-kidneys' from human stem cells
Medical News Today
The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Disease states that more than 20 million adults in the U.S. have some form of chronic kidney disease, showing the need for better knowledge and treatment of the condition.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Study: Few hurt by health insurance policy cancellations
The Columbus Dispatch
Fewer than 6 percent of Americans younger than 65 have individual health plans, and most don't stand to lose their coverage without the promise of better insurance at a discount, according to a new report from Families USA. Furthermore, many of the policyholders wouldn't renew them anyway, says the group, which pushed for healthcare reform.
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Obama administration to push back health insurance enrollment for 2015
The Wall Street Journal
The Obama administration is planning to push back the period during which Americans sign up for coverage under the new health law in its second year of operation, a change that could reassure insurers while also avoiding the 2014 midterm elections. The Department of Health and Human Services will allow Americans to start signing up for coverage starting Nov. 15, 2014, rather than Oct. 15, 2014, a department official said.
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No HealthCare.gov? No problem, private sites say
USA Today
Almost two months into the troubled launch of the government's new online health insurance store, Jerry Zweiger wants you to know — he beat the line. The 35-year-old collection agency owner bought his coverage that met the Affordable Care Act's requirements in half an hour. It took him five minutes to enter his information and about 20 to compare plans, he said.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Forest's antipsychotic ambitions thwarted by FDA delay
FiercePharma
Forest Laboratories has a slate of new products meant to be its life raft. Swamped by generic competition for its top seller, the antidepressant Lexapro, the company promises that these new drugs will keep its head above water — and then grow fast enough to propel new growth. But what happens when one of those new products — the antipsychotic drug cariprazine — gets a thumbs down from the FDA?
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FDA approves next gen sequencers in watershed for personalized medicine
Government Health IT
The Food and Drug Administration gave its first authorization of a high-throughput or "next generation" DNA sequencing device. Sixty years after the discovery of the DNA and 10 years after the first sequencing of the human genome, the agency signed off on marketing for four DNA diagnostics. Two of the cleared devices detect DNA changes in a regulating gene that can lead to cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease causing mucus to build up in the lungs, digestive tract and other organs.
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US FDA approves GlaxoSmithKline's H5N1 bird flu vaccine
Reuters
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it has approved GlaxoSmithKline Plc's pandemic flu vaccine for use in the event of an H5N1 bird flu epidemic. The vaccine will be added to the national stockpile and will not be available for commercial use, the FDA said. The vaccine is the first H5N1 vaccine to be approved in the United States to contain an adjuvant, or booster, that turbo-charges the body's immune response to the vaccine.
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FDA approves medical device to treat epilepsy
Today's Medical Developments
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a device to help reduce the frequency of seizures in epilepsy patients who have not responded well to medications. The RNS Stimulator, implanted within the skull under the scalp, is connected to one or two wires that are placed where the seizures are suspected to originate within the brain or on the surface of the brain.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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