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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Big brains are all in the genes
Phys.Org
Scientists have moved a step closer to understanding genetic changes that permitted humans and other mammals to develop such big brains. During evolution, different mammal species have experienced variable degrees of expansion in brain size. An important goal of neurobiology is to understand the genetic changes underlying these extraordinary adaptations.
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Genes and air pollution combine to increase autism risk
Medical News Today
Children with a particular gene variant who are exposed to air pollution appear to be at a higher risk of developing autism, according to researchers from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. Drawing on results of previous studies that have shown associations between air pollution and autism, and between autism and the MET gene, the researchers say their new study reveals that the combination of these factors increases the risk of autism.
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How genes influence human behavior and cognitive abilities
Science World Report
Our genes partially define who we are and how we act. Yet studying how genes influence cognitive abilities and behavior as the brain develops from childhood to adulthood has been difficult thus far. Now, scientists have managed to make inroads when it comes to understanding how genes influence brain structure and cognitive abilities and how neural circuits produce language.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


New test may help predict survival from ovarian cancer
Health.com via HealthDay News
By counting the number of cancer-fighting immune cells inside tumors, scientists say they may have found a way to predict survival from ovarian cancer The researchers developed an experimental method to count these cells, called tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, in women with early stage and advanced ovarian cancer.
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Personalized flu shots offer best chance to beat season
Bloomberg
A wave of new flu vaccines designed for the first time to focus on individual groups, including children, the elderly and people with allergies, may help boost U.S. vaccination rates as the new season develops this year. Traditionally, less than half of Americans get vaccinated. Now, in a banner year, the Food and Drug Administration has approved three new vaccines for the nascent flu season that will bring the concept of personalized medicine to the yearly effort to control influenza, the nation's eighth-biggest killer.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Researchers unlock a new means of growing intestinal stem cells
MIT News
Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have shown that they can grow unlimited quantities of intestinal stem cells, then stimulate them to develop into nearly pure populations of different types of mature intestinal cells. Using these cells, scientists could develop and test new drugs to treat diseases such as ulcerative colitis.
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New colorectal cancer target found in stem cell gene
Medical News Today
Researchers in Canada found that switching off a gene in the cancer stem cells that drive colon cancer stops them from being able to renew themselves. They say their study offers a starting point to treatments that could shut the cancer down. Cancer stem cells are cells that have the ability to differentiate into all the types of cell that exist in that type of tumor.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Human stem cells used to create lung tissue
LiveScience via Fox News
Human stem cells have been converted into functioning lung cells for the first time, paving the way for better models of lung diseases, ways to test potential drugs and, ultimately, creation of tissue for lung transplants. Scientists had previously converted stem cells into cells of the heart, intestine, liver, nerves and pancreas.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The dirty little secret of how to choose the best surgeons (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
For some cancer patients, personalized medicine has arrived (Live Science)
Victoria Rathmill, 17, becomes the youngest stem cell donor in the world (The Huffington Post)
New cell therapy leading way to faster tissue repair (Military.com via Fox News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Google Glass enables surgeons to consult remotely
InformationWeek
When surgeon Brent Ponce wore Google Glass during a shoulder replacement, the ghostly hand of a remote collaborator coached him along. Brent Ponce wasn't the first surgeon to bring Google Glass into the operating room, but he may have been the first to use it as a truly collaborative tool.
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Study IDs risks for ureteral injury from robotic prostatectomy
Renal and Urology News
Preoperative evaluation and surgical planning can help prevent ureteral injuries during robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, according to investigators who have identified characteristics that put patients at risk for this complication.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Big brains are all in the genes
Phys.Org
Scientists have moved a step closer to understanding genetic changes that permitted humans and other mammals to develop such big brains.

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6 technology trends that will change your family's health forever
Fox News
When the Affordable Care Act takes effect in January, it will not only change the healthcare system but how we manage our families' health and our own.

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The 6 biggest innovations in healthcare technology in 2013
MedCity News
This year we've witnessed amazing innovations in technology with everything from wearable tech like Google Glass or Nike+ to the recent introduction of Coin, one card that stores all your credit cards, debit cards, personal accounts, business accounts and other cards typically filling your wallet.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Health insurance exchanges: What you need to know before you buy
Forbes
Scott Kraft, a 40-year-old marathon enthusiast, spent more than a decade covering healthcare policy in the Washington, D.C., area as a reporter before transplanting to Portland, Ore., a few months ago. But while he knows the insides and outsides of the Affordable Care Act, and appreciates that he can get access to the same insurance as his friends without asthma, he is having a hard time making the commitment to enroll in a plan through his state's healthcare exchange website. A handful of states launched their own healthcare exchange websites when HealthCare.gov launched, as part of the ACA.
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Obamacare Medicare Part D works, but critics call plan wasteful
U.S. News & World Report
It seems everyday there are reports on the latest glitch associated with the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But word from a government agency is that seniors enrolled in the Medicare Part D portion of Obamacare are saving billions. "Seniors and people with disabilities with Medicare prescription drug plan coverage saved $8.9 billion to date on their prescription drugs thanks to the Affordable Care Act," the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Studies, said in a report.
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Feds: HealthCare.gov 'night and day' from October
NBC News
Two months after its disastrous launch, HealthCare.gov is much better, working more than 90 percent of the time and up to the promised capacity of 50,000 users at any given time, government officials said. But it's not at 100 percent yet, with the final steps of enrollment still glitchy.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves new hepatitis C treatment
Healthline
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Johnson & Johnson's new hepatitis C drug, which has been hailed as a cure for the infectious disease that's believed to affect 3.2 million Americans. The drug, Olysio, and others being used to treat the disease are giving patients — including many aging baby boomers — a new lease on life.
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FDA approves Varithena injectable foam for treating varicose veins
Healio
BTG announced that the FDA has approved its polidocanol injectable foam for treating patients with incompetent veins and visible varicosities of the great saphenous vein system. The FDA approval was based on two placebo-controlled phase 3 trials in which the "majority of patients treated" with Varithena, a sclerosing agent, achieved clinically meaningful improvement in superficial venous incompetence symptoms and visible varicosities appearance, while addressing the underlying incompetence, according to a press release.
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FDA approves new hepatitis C treatment
Healthline
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Johnson & Johnson's new hepatitis C drug, which has been hailed as a cure for the infectious disease that's believed to affect 3.2 million Americans. The drug, Olysio, and others being used to treat the disease are giving patients — including many aging baby boomers — a new lease on life.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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