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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Study: 'Mindfulness' meditation alters gene expression
The Huffington Post
It's no secret that mindfulness meditation — a practice that encourages focusing attention on the present moment — can ease emotional stress. And evidence is mounting that mindfulness also may have key benefits for your physical health — from lowering blood pressure to helping curb addiction. But a new study conducted by researchers working in Wisconsin, Spain and France shows that mindfulness can even affect your genes. Specifically, the study shows that mindfulness can limit the "expression" of genes associated with inflammation.
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Scientists identify important new genes for epilepsy
New-Medical.net
Scientists screening the DNA of large cohorts for known and suspected epilepsy associated genes are finding that, while some genes are implicated in discrete phenotypes or forms of epilepsy, other genes are implicated in a wider range of phenotypes. Although ion channel genes are a common cause of epilepsy, the researchers also report a significant number of epilepsy patients with mutations in non-ion channel genes. The studies have important implications for treatment, prognosis and risk counseling.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

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Single gene, once under radar, helps drive 1/100 cancers
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
When studying genetic drivers of cancer, scientists often focus on genes that are mutated at a high rate, in single type of cancer. But an alternative approach is possible — focusing on genes that mutate at low rates, in many types of cancer. This alternative approach, taken by researchers centered at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has identified a gene that drives the development of tumors in over 1 percent of all cancer patients.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Can personalized medicine and an adaptive trial design salvage this hard-luck drug?
Forbes
Arca Biopharma announced that it had received FDA clearance to start a phase 2B/3 trial of its novel beta-blocker, Gencaro (bucindolol) for the prevention of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure. The GENETIC-AF trial has all the hallmarks of the modern era: The drug will only be tested in patients with a genetic variation that the company believes may predict a positive response to the drug.
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Top 5 reasons big data is advancing personalized medicine
IT Business Edge
Big Data as it pertains to healthcare has emerged at the center of the revolution in personalized medicine. Simply put, the proliferation of data offers great possibilities for more precise diagnosis, as researchers are able to drill down to see what's happening and create more targeted therapies, specifically at the molecular and tissue levels.
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Cancer personalized medicine: What you need to know
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
In this GEN Market & Tech Analysis report GEN examines the landscape of cancer personalized medicine based on the results of bottom-up market analyses, which pinpoint the current status and trajectory of cancer personalized medicine.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells for Parkinson's getting ready for clinic
The San Diego Union-Tribune
A groundbreaking attempt to heal eight Parkinson's patients with their own cells could move from research to the clinic next year. For eight Parkinson's patients seeking treatment with a new form of stem cell therapy, 2014 promises to be a milestone. If all goes well, next year the FDA will give approval to begin clinical trials. And if the patients can raise enough money, the scientists and doctors working with them will have the money to proceed.
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A step closer to muscle regeneration
Science Codex
Muscle cell therapy to treat some degenerative diseases, including muscular dystrophy, could be a more realistic clinical possibility, now that scientists have found a way to isolate muscle cells from embryonic tissue. Ph.D. Student Bianca Borchin and Associate Professor Tiziano Barberi from the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University have developed a method to generate skeletal muscle cells, paving the way for future applications in regenerative medicine.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Genes and air pollution combine to increase autism risk (Medical News Today)
Health insurance exchanges: What you need to know before you buy (Forbes)
Study IDs risks for ureteral injury from robotic prostatectomy (Renal and Urology News)
Obamacare Medicare Part D works, but critics call plan wasteful (U.S. News & World Report)
Google Glass enables surgeons to consult remotely (InformationWeek)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Forget wearable computing, ingestible technology is much more interesting
Market Intelligence Center
There is a lot of buzz around the technology industry regarding wearable technology. Smart watches, Google Glass, and even a "smart wig" concept from Sony have dominated headlines this year in the tech world. Covidien, a maker of medical equipment and supplies, is also into the idea, and as such the company is purchasing Given Imaging for a reported $860 million.
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Don't expect slower rise in health spending to last: New technology will keep medical costs exorbitant
Medical Daily
Researchers have pegged the gentler rise in healthcare costs over the last decade to factors that many might consider less obvious. A study found that insurance and technology issues were the main reasons why the rise in health costs haven't been so steep of late — playing a larger role than the latest financial crisis or the Affordable Care Act.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: 'Mindfulness' meditation alters gene expression
The Huffington Post
It's no secret that mindfulness meditation — a practice that encourages focusing attention on the present moment — can ease emotional stress.

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read more
Big brains are all in the genes
Phys.Org
Scientists have moved a step closer to understanding genetic changes that permitted humans and other mammals to develop such big brains.

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How genes influence human behavior and cognitive abilities
Science World Report
Our genes partially define who we are and how we act. Yet studying how genes influence cognitive abilities and behavior as the brain develops from childhood to adulthood has been difficult thus far.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Why HealthCare.gov should have been a mobile app
By Alex Bratton
Of all the problems with the HealthCare.gov site, perhaps the most baffling is why it was created as a website in the first place. The main target of the HealthCare.gov website is young, healthy millennials, those aged 18-29 years old. Since millennials don't run up big healthcare bills, their monthly premiums will subsidize the insurance benefits of nearly 4.3 million older and less healthy Americans. The problem with HealthCare.gov is that these millennials don't get their information the same way as older generations.
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Medicare patients will get a financial break in 2014
MarketWatch
Medicare beneficiaries got some good news this fall, when government officials announced that the part B monthly premium and annual deductible would remain flat for 2014. The cost picture is more complicated when it comes to other parts of Medicare, however, and beneficiaries face a narrowing window to make changes to coverage before open enrollment ends on Dec. 7.
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Health insurance exchanges and the innovator's dilemma — Is the future costovation?
Forbes
It's a heady time in the U.S. health insurance industry. Over 30 million Americans are expected to acquire coverage as the Affordable Care Act takes effect, yet the boon of new customers is offset by a gnawing fear that profit margins will vanish. Due to the ACA and economic pressures, health insurers that have thrived since the World War II now face tough choices, and their responses will shape the future of healthcare overall.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA still unconvinced on once-rejected diabetes drug from Bristol-Myers, AstraZeneca
FierceBiotech
AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb are heading back to the FDA with the once-spurned dapagliflozin, claiming they've addressed the diabetes drug's cancer risks, but agency staff remains wary of the treatment's dangers. In documents released before an advisory panel meeting, FDA reviewers acknowledged that dapagliflozin's big pharma sponsors have turned in a wealth of new data from humans, dogs and mice to show that the drug doesn't promote bladder tumor growth.
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11 game-changing drugs approved by the FDA in 2013
The Motley Fool via DailyFinance
Time certainly flies when you're having fun — and much fun was to be had this year, with all three major market indexes returning in excess of 2 percent year-to-date.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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