This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit December 18, 2014
Advertisement
   NAMCP Medical Directors Institute   AAMCN    AAIHDS    Conferences    JMCM    Contact Us  

Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


Click here to visit the conference website.

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Otezla® (apremilast) is approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. Please click here for more information.

 



2014 Innovation Award Winners
NAMCP, AAMCN and AAIHDS are pleased to announce the winners of the first annual Innovation Awards, which recognize a company or organization that is improving outcomes, costs or quality using an innovative method in the workplace. The award winners are as follows:

NAMCP Medical Directors Institute Innovation Award Winner: Keystone First, an affiliate of AmeriHealth Caritas

AAMCN Innovation Award Winner: MDWise

AAIHDS Innovation Award Winner: Yale-New Haven
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Save the date: 2015 Spring Managed Care Forum

Save the date for the 2015 Spring Forum being held April 23-24, 2015 at Disney's Yacht & Beach Club. More information will be available shortly.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


GENOMICS


New way to turn genes on
MIT News
Using a gene-editing system originally developed to delete specific genes, MIT researchers have now shown that they can reliably turn on any gene of their choosing in living cells. This new application for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system should allow scientists to more easily determine the function of individual genes, according to Feng Zhang, the W.M. Keck Career Development Professor in Biomedical Engineering in MIT’s Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Nature, nurture both figure into antisocial behavior
PsychCentral
If you happen to carry a particular variant for one of three common genes, you may be more likely to engage in antisocial behavior, but only if you were exposed to an abusive or adverse environment in childhood, according to a new study. The findings confirm previous studies that show how negative experiences can influence how genetic variants affect the brain, and therefore promote negative behavior, according to a new study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Measure, Monitor Immunoglobulin Treatment Outcomes
BioFeedback for immunoglobulin is a health outcomes reporting program that provides clinical feedback on the use of immunoglobulin in autoimmune-related disorders. Physicians and medical directors can now deploy clinical interventions when they have the greatest impact on healthcare quality and costs.

Request more information or schedule a personal introduction.
 


Loops and folds of our DNA to shed light on disease
New Scientist
A lot of things look clearer in 3-D, and that goes for the genome too. The human genome was sequenced about 10 years ago, but that still left us with much to learn about its structure and function. Some of the gaps have since been filled, but how our full complement of DNA — 1.8 metres long when stretched out –— fits into the nuclei of our cells remained elusive.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Distinguishing 'personalized medicine' and 'biologically personalized therapeutics'
Medscape
"Personalized medicine" has become a generic term referring to techniques that evaluate either the host or the disease to enhance the likelihood of beneficial patient outcomes from treatment interventions. There is, however, much more to personalization of care than just identifying the biotherapeutic strategy with the highest likelihood of benefit. In its new meaning, "personalized medicine" could overshadow the individually tailored, whole-person care that is at the bedrock of what people need and want when they are ill.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
What is Solesta?

What does a good day mean for your patients?

LEARN MORE
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the GBEMTI eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
MORE


Can we trust drug companies? The future of healthcare may depend on it
Wired
Providers’ relationship with life science companies has been difficult, to say the least. But it has become clear that to move the needle on improving healthcare, these stakeholders will have to learn to work together. Providers guard a wealth of physiological data on patient populations within their electronic health records.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cell therapy may someday replace corneal transplants
Medscape
Stromal stem cells from patients' own eyes may replace corneal transplants, suggests a study published in the of Science Translational Medicine. Sayan Basu, M.D., from L. V. Prasad Eye Institute in Hyderabad, India, and colleagues have been working with mesenchymal/stromal corneal stem cells for a decade.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  InSightec - World Leader in MRgFUS

MRgFUS is being used in clinics across America to treat uterine fibroids and pain palliation for metastatic bone tumors. It’s a completely non-invasive procedure performed on an outpatient basis where patients report an improvement in QoL within days, not weeks. Discover InSightec now.
 


This new kind of stem cell may revolutionize how we treat diseases
TIME
Ever since Japanese researcher Shinya Yamanaka found a way to treat skin cells with four genes and reprogram them back to their embryonic state, scientists have been buzzing over the promise of stem cell therapies. Stem cells can be coaxed to become any of the body’s cell types, so they could potentially replace diseased or missing cells in conditions such as diabetes or Alzheimer’s.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Cell biologists discover on-off switch for key stem cell gene
Phys.org
Consider the relationship between an air traffic controller and a pilot. The pilot gets the passengers to their destination, but the air traffic controller decides when the plane can take off and when it must wait. The same relationship plays out at the cellular level in animals, including humans.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Advancement revolutionizes hereditary cancer testing

Myriad myRisk™ Hereditary Cancer utilizes both genetic test status AND personal cancer family history to identify elevated risk for 8 important cancers by analyzing multiple, clinically significant genes. Myriad myRisk improves clinical sensitivity by 40-50% compared to current testing paradigms in a cost-effective manner, providing more value to your members.
 


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


App helps patients, physicians connect via telemedicine
Health IT Outcomes
Smartphones are now being used to bring patients and doctors together in consult via mobile app. A new mobile app called TouchCare enables patients to engage in video appointments with their physicians using smartphones or tablets, offering a secure connection, convenience, and more personalized healthcare, according to a press release.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Using technology to optimize population healthcare coordination outcomes
Healthcare Informatics
More than 2,600 hospitals will receive financial penalties in 2015 as a result of excessive numbers of hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. A recent analysis shows population health management initiatives can reduce readmissions, improve community healthcare outcomes, and increase revenues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Telehealth can save $100 or more per visit
FierceHealthIT
As telehealth services grow throughout the country, they provide both improved care and ways to cut costs. The average estimated cost of a telehealth visit saves about $100 or more compared to the estimated cost for in-person care, according to a study by Dale H. Yamamoto of Red Quill Consulting, Inc.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves new version of cervical cancer vaccine
The New York Times
The drug maker Merck received approval for an updated version of its Gardasil vaccine, which protects against the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer. The Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil 9, which protects against nine strains of the virus called HPV, or human papillomavirus, up from four strains covered by the original vaccine approved in 2006.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief? Click here to visit the archive page.


Edwards CEO hopes FDA to accelerate approvals of medical devices
Reuters
U.S. health regulators appear open to speeding up approvals of medical devices that currently often reach European markets three to five years ahead of being cleared in the United States, the chief executive officer of Edwards Lifesciences said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


New accountable care organizations bring health to communities
EHR Intelligence
Payers and healthcare providers continue to collaborate for value-based reimbursement and population health by forming new accountable care organizations and agreements. Providers in Michigan, Colorado, Connecticut, and Arizona announced partnership arrangements that will foster community health and coordinated care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AHA: New ACO regulations 'may be moving in the wrong direction'
Hospitals & Health Networks
The Medicare Shared Savings Program has hit a few bumps in its second year, with some accountable care organization participants failing to hit their targets. The feds hope that new rules, proposed earlier this month, will help to build momentum in the accountable care movement, but others — such as the American Hospital Association — are concerned that the changes don’t go far enough.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


ONC data shows money is a major motivator for EHR adoption
By Scott E. Rupp
According to a data brief released recently by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, financial incentives and potential penalties are key motivators for physicians adopting electronic health records since 2009. The brief, based on data from the 2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, details why physicians have chosen to adopt — or not adopt — EHRs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Ebola and the year of horrors and heroes
By Joan Spitrey
Time magazine recently announced its Person of the Year: the Ebola fighters. The runners-up included notable people such as Vladimir Putin and the Ferguson protestors. All of those considered where notable newsmakers this year, but nothing captivated the news — especially within healthcare — than Ebola and the brave souls fighting this enormous fight. This past year a small, microscopic virus showed the world its strength. It spotlighted our deficits in disease control and prevention.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How well you sleep may depend on your genes (HealthDay News via CBS News)
The NFL has a problem with stem cell treatments (MIT Technology Review)
Why millennials hate their least expensive healthcare option (TIME)
5 key changes providers can expect from the new ACO rule proposal (Healthcare Dive)
Genomics: What you should know (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 11, 2014
Dec. 4, 2014
Nov. 27, 2014
Nov. 20, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063