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As 2014 comes to a close, GBEMTI would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the GBEMTI eNews a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 8.


Genetic match? Why people tend to marry those with similar DNA
LiveScience via CBS News
From May 22: Going on a first date? The chance that it leads to wedding bells may depend, in part, on how similar his or her DNA is to yours. New research finds that people tend to pick spouses whose genetic profile shares similarities with their own. The effect is subtle (other similarities, such as similarity in education, have a larger influence), but it's important to understand that mating isn't truly genetically random, researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Schizophrenia 'made up of 8 specific genetic disorders'
Medical News Today
From Sept. 18: Past studies have indicated that rather than being a single disease, schizophrenia is a collection of different disorders. Now, a new study by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis claims the condition consists of eight distinct genetic disorders, all of which present their own specific symptoms.
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Massive study reveals schizophrenia's genetic roots
Scientific American
From Oct. 23: Schizophrenia is a distressing disorder involving hallucinations, delusions, paranoia and agitation. It affects around one in 100 people in the U.S., with symptoms usually first appearing between the ages of 16 and 30. Its causes have long been debated, particularly regarding whether genetics plays a role. It is known to be highly heritable, but small sample sizes and other methodology hurdles stymied early attempts to discern a genetic link.
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Older moms may have genes for longevity
The Washington Post
From July 3: A silver lining for some older moms: The genes that allow some women to naturally have children later in life also make it likely these women will live a longer life. A study published found that women who are able to have children after age 33 — without using drugs or other infertility treatments–have a greater chance of living longer than women who had their last child before 30.
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DNA study links blonde hair to tiny change in genes
The Huffington Post
From June 5: For all those brunettes wishing they were naturally blond, a small genetic change could have made all the difference. Scientists have found that replacing one of DNA's four letters at a key spot in the genome shifts a particular gene's activity and leads to fairer hair.
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Is there a happiness gene?
LiveScience via Yahoo News
From Aug. 7: One secret to happiness may lie in genes, a new study suggests. Denmark and other Scandinavian countries regularly top world happiness rankings, and while many factors influence happiness, genetics may play a larger role than previously thought, according to the study authors.
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How genes can influence our mood
The Huffington Post
From July 10: Michael Stanclift writes: When Susan first came to see me, she was feeling pretty low. She had debilitating fatigue, and her body ached all over. Susan had been prescribed an antidepressant, and it helped with her depression a little, but she was still constantly anxious and had difficulty concentrating. Everything seemed "life or death," her performance at work was declining, and she was afraid she would lose her job if things didn't change soon.
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Uncovering clues to the genetic cause of schizophrenia
Medical Xpress
From May 29: The overall number and nature of mutations — rather than the presence of any single mutation — influences an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia, as well as its severity, according to a discovery by Columbia University Medical Center researchers published in the latest issue of Neuron. The findings could have important implications for the early detection and treatment of schizophrenia.
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Study suggests genetic link for male homosexuality
The Associated Press via Yahoo Health
From Nov. 27: A large study of gay brothers adds to evidence that genes influence men's chances of being homosexual, but the results aren't strong enough to prove it. Some scientists believe several genes might affect sexual orientation. Researchers who led the new study of nearly 800 gay brothers say their results bolster previous evidence pointing to genes on the X chromosome.
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  Advancement revolutionizes hereditary cancer testing

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When cancer is in your genes
U.S. News & World Report
From Sept. 11: In many families, cancer genes are passed down through generations like an unwanted heirloom. But thanks to ever-improving genetic testing, doctors are able to identify these genes better than ever before — and offer patients treatment options to not only stop cancer from setting in, but to stop the gene from being passed on as well.
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Miss an issue of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief? Click here to visit the archive page.


FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How well you sleep may depend on your genes (HealthDay News via CBS News)
The NFL has a problem with stem cell treatments (MIT Technology Review)
Why millennials hate their least expensive healthcare option (TIME)
5 key changes providers can expect from the new ACO rule proposal (Healthcare Dive)
Genomics: What you should know (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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