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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 


As 2013 comes to a close, GBEMTI would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the GBEMTI eNews a look at the most-accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 9.


Could some of our favorite flavorings be damaging our DNA?
TIME
From April 4: Plants are all-natural sources of all things good for us, right? It turns out some of our favorite plant-based flavorings may do more harm than good. Scientists from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology that teas, coffees and "smoky flavoring" could be damaging our DNA at levels comparable to that caused by chemotherapy drugs.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Gene therapy cures leukemia in 8 days
New Scientist
From March 28: Within just eight days of starting a novel gene therapy, David Aponte's "incurable" leukemia had vanished. For four other patients, the same happened within eight weeks, although one later died from a blood clot unrelated to the treatment, and another after relapsing.
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Male sensitivity written in the genes
The New York Times
From Sept. 12: In human development, certain genes act as master switches, ensuring that we are born with similar attributes (one head, two lungs, 10 fingers) in nearly all circumstances. Such genes tend to be highly reliable and resistant to environmental factors. But the gene responsible for activating male development is surprisingly unstable, leaving the pathway to male sexuality fraught with inconsistency, a study finds.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists identify important new genes for epilepsy (New-Medical.net)
Cancer personalized medicine: What you need to know (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News)
Forget wearable computing, ingestible technology is much more interesting (Market Intelligence Center)
Single gene, once under radar, helps drive 1/100 cancers (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News)
Stem cells for Parkinson's getting ready for clinic (The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Why your DNA may not be your destiny
LiveScience
From June 6: Ten years ago, when researchers completed the first map of all the genes of human beings, the immense undertaking promised to revolutionize the field of molecular medicine. It did, but something was still missing. By sequencing the 3 billion chemical base pairs that make up human DNA, scientists were able to glean new information about genes and how they are expressed.
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Scientists link gene variant to human longevity
Sci-News.com
From Jan. 10: Their findings, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, show that the genetic variant called the dopamine receptor 4 7-repeat allele, or DRD4 7R allele for short, appears in significantly higher rates in people more than 90-years old. DRD4 7R allele is part of the dopamine system, which facilitates the transmission of signals among neurons and plays a major role in the brain network responsible for attention and reward-driven learning.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Big brains are all in the genes
Phys.Org
Scientists have moved a step closer to understanding genetic changes that permitted humans and other mammals to develop such big brains.

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6 technology trends that will change your family's health forever
Fox News
When the Affordable Care Act takes effect in January, it will not only change the healthcare system but how we manage our families' health and our own.

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The 6 biggest innovations in healthcare technology in 2013
MedCity News
This year we've witnessed amazing innovations in technology with everything from wearable tech like Google Glass or Nike+ to the recent introduction of Coin, one card that stores all your credit cards, debit cards, personal accounts, business accounts and other cards typically filling your wallet.

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Fountain of youth? Scientists find genetic clue to aging reversal
HealthDay News
From Feb. 7: A discovery about the aging process in mice might one day help efforts to develop treatments for age-related diseases in humans, researchers report. The biologists say they turned back the "molecular clock" in old mice by placing a "longevity" gene into their blood stem cells.
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'Seismic shift' lifts primary care's impact on hospital revenues
American Medical News
From May 23: A survey finding specialists accounting for less revenue to hospitals reflects changes putting more emphasis on primary care as the Affordable Care Act is implemented.
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Toddler born without a windpipe get artificial trachea
ABC News
From May 6: In a groundbreaking feat of science and surgery, a Korean toddler born without a windpipe received an artificial trachea made from her own stem cells.
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Breast cancer genetic testing gets covered by healthcare reform
MyHealthNewsDaily
From March 7: Genetic testing for breast cancer will be covered under the Affordable Care Act, potentially saving women who need the test thousands of dollars. Myriad Genetics, the company that makes the test for the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, said that the U.S. government considers these tests to be preventive services. This means that private insurance plans are required to cover the cost of the tests, including co-pays, deductibles and coinsurance, provided that the plans do not have a "grandfathered" status.
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World first genetically modified babies born
Daily Mail
From May 9: The world's first genetically modified humans have been created. The disclosure that 30 healthy babies were born after a series of experiments in the United States provoked another furious debate about ethics. So far, two of the babies have been tested and have been found to contain genes from three "parents."
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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