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10 things you need to know about Esri's open data initiative
Directions Magazine
Executive Editor Adena Schutzberg had a valuable one-on-one conversation with Esri's Andrew Turner, the chief technical officer at Esri's R&D Center in Washington, D.C. She shares the takeaways as the company prepares to roll out the first set of tools in its Open Data Initiative.
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How has geodesign sparked geospatial technology innovation?
Sensors & Systems
Often, a really good problem to solve is needed in order to spur technology innovation. The evolution of geographic information systems from primarily recording conditions into an environment where it becomes the impetus for environmental or urban actions certainly has proven to be a challenge. This challenge comes at a time when CAD, BIM, and GIS are converging, and there are increasing numbers of sensors to inform our understanding of the world, often in real time.
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Why utilities will soon be obsolete in Hawaii and California (and then your state)
Smart Grid News
Thanks to a confluence of factors, the electricity grid may soon become optional in certain parts of the United States. Low-cost solar and storage could soon allow customers to go from grid connected to grid defected. Rocky Mountain Institute, HOMER Energy, and CohnReznick Think Energy have collaborated on The Economics of Grid Defection: When and where distributed solar generation plus storage competes with traditional utility service.
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Penn State's GIS lab helps uncover mysteries from the ancient world
Penn State University
Ken Hirth, a Penn State anthropology professor, is sitting in the University's Anthropology geographic information system lab. He clicks a button on his mouse and an aerial map of Mexico City fills the screen of the computer — yellow dots cover the landscape in a near-perfect grid. The dots represent survey points from the 1970s, when a team of researchers plotted a grid and recorded any archaeological material they discovered and its density at each point.
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Out in front: Who's been mining my location?
GPS World
Conventional wisdom holds that smartphone users will tolerate diluted privacy — specifically, privacy of their own location — in return for the many advantages delivered by the location-based services on their devices.

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What impact will Google's new mapping phone have on our digital realities?
Sensors & Systems
Google has just released details of an initiative dubbed Project Tango that provisions an Android smartphone with the ability to map and remember location.

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Online media tackle geography and mapping
Directions Magazine
Three popular online media properties have been taking on geography and mapping since at least the last Esri User Conference last July. James Fallows American Futures project is a partnership between The Atlantic, Marketplace and Esri.

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60 percent of developers are below the 'app poverty line,' earning less than $500 per app per month!
GIS User
Some interesting research from VisionMobile reveals trends and revenue opportunities based on mobile platform. Vision Mobile has a new Developer Economics Q1 2014 report based on a survey of 7,000 app developers in 127 countries. As might be expected, iOS and Android are very dominant and iOS remains as top revenue earner. However, if you want apps to provide revenue, read on.
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New geospatial standard a 'key enabler' for Internet of Things
Spar Point Group
The Open Geospatial Consortium said it approved the Sensor Model Language 2.0 Encoding Standard. The OGC is an international consortium of more than 470 companies, government agencies, research groups and universities developing publicly available, or "open," geospatial standards, which support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT.
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Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Online media tackle geography and mapping (Directions Magazine)
Why LiDAR has become the go to technology for utility corridor mapping (Directions Magazine)
Why the world needs OpenStreetMap (Directions Magazine)
Domino's Pizza gets customer specific using geospatial analytics (ZD Net)
Making sense of sensors (GPS World)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The National Map and National Atlas merge
Directions Magazine
This year, National Atlas of the United States and The National Map will transition into a combined single source for geospatial and cartographic information. This transformation is projected to streamline access to maps, data and information from the USGS National Geospatial Program. This action will prioritize our civilian mapping role and consolidate core investments while maintaining top-quality customer service.
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Pentagon chooses Global Hawk over U-2, trims other unmanned systems
Inside GNSS
With the war in Afghanistan winding down and the pressure against federal spending increasing, the Pentagon is reconfiguring itself for leaner peacetime operations and unmanned aerial vehicles are among the programs being affected. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel outlined some of the cuts to be proposed when the White House presents its fiscal year 2015 budget to Congress on March 4.
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