Performance Digest
Jan. 20, 2009

Leaders Shouldn't Be Silent in Tough Times
from the Seattle Post Intelligencer
These are anxious times in the American workplace. Retailers had the worst Christmas season in decades, long-standing companies are closing their doors, workers are being laid off by the thousands and cutbacks are far and wide. Needless to say, tensions are running high everywhere. There is a lot of fear of the unknown; workers are literally worried sick. How to deal with all of this anxiety is a timely topic worthy of exploration. Wise leaders understand that emotions are contagious. Anxiety left unchecked can spread like wildfire in today's environment. Companies and senior managers need to take a proactive approach to managing anxiety or risk it paralyzing their work force. More

Employers Brace for Worker Time-Off for Obama Inaugural
from All Headline News
Today is an official working day in the U.S., but many employers are prepared to treat it like a holiday, anticipating most workers would prefer to celebrate Barack Obama's swearing in as the 44th American president than toil. The Society for Human Resource Management estimates 5 percent of business will shut down on Tuesday, while others will open but provide TV sets in the workplace to provide their employees an opportunity to view the historic event. These measures may boost worker productivity at a time when many employees are insecure about their jobs and the economy in general, according to productivity experts. More

“One Size Fits All” Won’t Work to Motivate Employees, Advises SHL
from PR Web
SHL, the global leader in talent assessment solutions, recently issued research that found that there are striking differences in what motivates different employees – for instance, only a quarter of employees find their manager motivational all or some of the time. The findings offer a cautionary note to employers who rely on a broad-brush approach when it comes to encouraging employee productivity. For example, according to the SHL research, men are much more likely to be de-motivated by poor senior management (38 percent) and poor line management (29 percent). Women, on the other hand, are more affected by criticism (17 percent) and poor relationships with colleagues (19 percent) than their male counterparts. Age also can have an impact on motivation, with young employees (aged 18 to 34) more likely to be de-motivated by uninteresting work (37 percent) than those over age 35 (26 percent). Young workers also are more motivated by company culture and their work environment than older colleagues. More

Making the Most of Your Workplace Mistakes
from The New York Times
You realize that you made a terrible mistake at work. Your first instinct is to deny that it happened or to cover it up. Then you feel angry and defensive, and want to blame other people. Then you want to hide. Are these reactions normal? It is only human for people who have made a mistake to have any or all of these initial reactions. A mistake can contradict your view of yourself as an effective worker, creating cognitive dissonance, said Carol Tavris, a social psychologist and co-author of "Mistakes Were Made (but Not by Me)." You think, "On this dimension where I pride myself on my abilities, I screwed up? Not possible," Dr. Tavris said. More

Six Sigma Training Surges
from MSNBC
As Barack Obama takes office, the weight of many Americans will be on his shoulders over the next four years. Many expect to see the changes instantly in their lives. They expect employment to increase dramatically, their tax liabilities to be reduced, the stock market to skyrocket, and perhaps even have a check waiting for them in their mailbox. Unfortunately, reality cannot be escaped. America has much work to do before it can begin to reverse its current course caused by decades of fiscal irresponsibility. Private companies have already begun to streamline their operations to survive what could be an economic depression. The results of this have been showing up recently in the business improvement sector. More

The 2009 HR Executive's Agenda
from CNN Money
The current economic downturn is the dominant force influencing business executives' plans for the coming year, and Human Capital executives are no exception. This is validated by research conducted during December 2008 in which Aberdeen Group, a Harte-Hanks Company (NYSE: HHS), found that while economic pressures are top of mind among 80% of human capital management (HCM) executives, human resources (HR) is under particular pressure to ensure its activities enable the organization to execute strategy and deliver on performance goals. Full Report. More

Leaders Shouldn't Be Silent in Tough Times
from the Seattle Post Intelligencer
These are anxious times in the American workplace. Retailers had the worst Christmas season in decades, long-standing companies are closing their doors, workers are being laid off by the thousands and cutbacks are far and wide. Needless to say, tensions are running high everywhere. There is a lot of fear of the unknown; workers are literally worried sick. How to deal with all of this anxiety is a timely topic worthy of exploration. Wise leaders understand that emotions are contagious. Anxiety left unchecked can spread like wildfire in today's environment. Companies and senior managers need to take a proactive approach to managing anxiety or risk it paralyzing their work force. More

UNE Opening Human Performance Lab
from Keepmecurrent.com
OA Centers for Orthopaedics and the University of New England (UNE) have announced plans to open a human performance laboratory at the new OA Sports Center in Saco. The first of its kind in Northern New England, the lab will provide athletes of every level and ability with access to sophisticated analysis tools for measuring, evaluating and improving their biomechanical and physiological performance. More

Human Performance Technology in Healthcare
from ISPI
Stories of how Human Performance Technology (HPT) helped improve healthcare are out there. Why stories? Real life stories attract attention to our vision and mission. They engage decision makers and strengthen the efficacies of our peers. Stories inspire and will help you and HPT gain credibility and engage healthcare administers. Why not tell your story! The ISPI CPT Healthcare Team is sponsoring a contest to help you tell your story. To enter you need to have a healthcare story to tell. Your story should capture the essence of what you did to improve performance within the healthcare industry. More