Performance Digest
Jan. 26, 2010

Where Process-Improvement Projects Go Wrong
from The Wall Street Journal
What do weight-loss plans and process-improvement programs such as Six Sigma and "lean manufacturing" have in common? They typically start off well, generating excitement and great progress, but all too often fail to have a lasting impact as participants gradually lose motivation and fall back into old habits. More

Understanding Helps Ease Workplace Generation Gaps
from The Oklahoman
There is little doubt that generational differences are having a major impact on the American workplace. As the Millennial Generation (born between 1982 and 2002) has increased its presence in the work force and teamed up with members of Generation X (born between 1965 and 1981), a perceptible shift in corporate relations toward employees is beginning to occur. More

Developing Rating Scales for Performance Tests
from ISPI
Are you frustrated with the same post-intervention testing time after time? Performance tests should seek to provide an objective rating of a behavior or product. Join William and Sharon as they navigate you through the development of a criterion-referenced test for your performance improvement interventions. More

How the Trends of 2000-2009 Will Shape Performance Improvement in This New Decade
from Six Sigma & Process Excellence IQ Blogger
As 2010 ushers in, it’s time for us to look at the key trends that surrounded the ecosystem of all businesses. These trends provide a cue into the way the engine of performance improvement will be driven going forward. Organizations serious about customers and improvements will find it difficult to neglect these events. More

Workplace Blame Is Contagious and Detrimental
from Fox News
Blaming mistakes on others is socially contagious, according to a new study. Just watching someone pawn their failures off on another can make you do the same to protect your self-image. The result can be detrimental to everyone involved, particularly in the workplace, researchers say. More

Middle Managers' Leaderships Skills are a Top L&D Priority in 2010, Henley Survey Shows
from HRmagazine.co.uk
According to the Corporate Learning Priorities Survey 2010 carried out by Henley Business School, leadership development is the most important priority for all HR professionals. The development of middle managers is considered extremely important with 67 percent naming it as their first or second priority, compared with only 35 percent rating leadership development for senior managers in their top five priorities. More

Management Key to Growth
from The Australian
The national accounts data should dispel any doubts as to the effectiveness of the government's fiscal stimulus package, which was well timed and calibrated. Consequently, Australia is one of only three advanced economies in the world to record positive growth in the past year. However, with the winding back of the stimulus, future growth and competitiveness are jeopardised by a legacy of poor productivity performance. More

Good Change Management: A Key Driver of Success
from Management-Issues
The annual Management Agenda from UK-based executive education and research institute, Roffey Park, identifies a direct link between the way companies practice change management and their ability to be innovative and agile in the tough economic climate. More

Why Diversity Can Backfire on Company Boards
from The Wall Street Journal
When it comes to corporate boards and diversity, the conventional wisdom is simple: Diversity is good. When directors are too alike, the thinking goes, they look at problems—and solutions—the same way. There's no one to challenge prevailing ideas, or to speak out on issues important to certain groups of customers and employees. More

Effective Partnerships for Better Labor Standards
from Ethical Corporation
In order to implement sustained change in manufacturing and effectively implement labor standards, global brands and governments must work collaboratively and engage in partnerships that define clear divisions of labor between themselves. More