ISPI Performance Digest
June. 22, 2010

Strategies for overcoming opposition to organizational change
Gather
It is human nature to resist what we picture as different. Change requires that we work to learn a new set of rules, when the older rules may have suited us just fine. In reality, neither our personal nor professional experiences will always be coordinated with what we perceive to be comfortable. In other words, we are not the heart of universe and the world does not rotate around our comfort levels. Conditions outside of our control will occur that force us to adapt to new policies, new arrangements, and new sets of laws. In the very best positions our involvement will be valued and our impressions will be sought giving us the chance to create the means that justify the end.More

Companies look at how they recognize good performance
The Sacramento Bee
With the economy coming back, employers are increasingly worried about retaining stressed-out employees who survived cutbacks, pay and benefit reductions, and increased workloads, experts say. Some employers are taking the opportunity to review their workplace cultures and how they recognize employees, re-examining everything from telecommuting to the structure of rewards programs and charity participation. The major challenge: doing it on a budget. "Companies are not going to want to spend any money," said Hank Stringer, principal at Stringer Executive Search of Austin, Texas, and co-author of "Talent Force: A New Manifesto for the Human Side of Business."More

Invitation to Present at THE Performance Improvement Conference 2011
ISPI
ISPI is inviting all members to submit a proposal to present at THE Performance Improvement Conference 2011, April 10-13 in Orlando, Fla. The goal is to shape the future of performance improvement through learning, teaching, collaborating, and networking. Educational sessions are designed to focus on current and emerging issues, best practices, and opportunities facing the performance improvement field.More

Tactical methods for collecting voice of the customer data
Six Sigma IQ
Charles Srour writes in Six Sigma IQ "What is voice of the customer? Voice of the customer is the identification of true customer needs and requirements. Organizations that align offerings directly to these needs are able to achieve best-in-class products and services. Six Sigma deployment aligned to VOC enables companies to constantly improve overall competitive value proposition, increase market share and improve profitability."More

Attracting and recruiting staff is top of the agenda for majority of organizations in 2010
HR magazine
Despite the reduction in recruitment activity during 2009, and the burgeoning labour market, two thirds of organizations have experienced recruitment difficulties, due mainly to a lack of necessary specialist skills. As a result, attracting and recruiting key staff is the top resourcing objective for eight in 10 of nearly 500 organizations surveyed. Half of the organizations taking part in this survey said the recession has had a negative impact on their resourcing budget for 2010. More

What are coaching cards and how are they used?
Reliable Plant Magazine
Coaching cards are a critical component of a comprehensive change management program. They are used to make sure that the change that an organization has put in place is actually working as planned. Using coaching cards creates a non-threatening opportunity to meet with those people living with the change in their daily lives and help them to be successful. Coaching cards were designed by project managers who had seen multiple, big organizational changes fade after a few weeks or months. Coaching cards alone will not guarantee a perfect change, but they are an essential part of the change after installation and training are over and new behaviors are expected.
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Dealing with the complexity gap
Management-Issues
The world is becoming more volatile, more uncertain and more complicated. That makes life tough for CEOs trying to navigate this complexity, many of whom don't believe that either they or their organisations are equipped to deal with it. How to respond to an increasingly complex, volatile and uncertain world is the primary challenge facing today's CEOs, according to a report from IBM's Institute for Business Value. And with all this uncertainty comes ambiguity — something a surprising number of CEOs feel ill-equipped to handle. The report, which interviewed more than 1,500 CEOs from companies of all sizes across 60 countries, says that CEOs are confronted with a "complexity gap" that poses a bigger challenge than any factor measured in eight years of CEO research. More

Innovation's dirty little secret
Businessweek
Jeneanne Rae, co-founder and president of Peer Insight, a consulting firm focused on services innovation and customer-experience design for S&P 500 firms writes in Businessweek "Recently I spoke with a group of executives from a $3 billion division of a large industrial company. They were faced with a mandate from the chief executive to expand the firm's service revenue from 20 percent to 33 percent. That's almost $400 million in new revenue, yet when I asked how many people were on the team, the leader replied meekly: "Two." This isn't good enough — and yet it's a systemic problem for those looking to implement innovation initiatives, particularly within large organizations.More

Tips for an effective management training program
Forth Worth Business Press
Building and maintaining a solid management team is critical to the success of any organization, regardless of the industry or company size. While training programs should always be high on the list of priorities for a growth-minded business, change management training is especially valuable during slow periods when companies are experiencing internal culture and policy changes due to external factors.More

Taking action against job burnout
CNN
For the growing number of employed workers who are experiencing burnout, Deborah Brown-Volkman of East Moriches, N.Y., a career coach and author of "How to Feel Great at Work Every Day," has some simple-sounding advice: "Plan your work and work your plan. That's how you will be something different." But coming up with ways to make that worn-to-the-core feeling a thing of the past is not easy. Taking time to seriously think about your workplace situation and how things might be made better may be the last thing on your agenda after a long day. For those willing to put in the effort, however, the return can be substantial.More