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Supreme Court approves Obamacare subsidies on HealthCare.gov
CNBC
Obamacare just survived a potentially fatal heart attack. In a major decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the federal subsidies that help nearly 6.4 million people pay for their Obamacare health plans are legal under the Affordable Care Act. The 6-3 ruling upholding that financial aid avoids what many analysts predicted would be a nightmare scenario had the plaintiffs won: individual plan insurance prices skyrocketing in 34 states and the loss of health coverage for upwards of 8 million people in those states served by the federal insurance marketplace HealthCare.gov as of next year.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


Authors Wanted for the Massachusetts Report on Nursing (ANA Massachusetts Newsletter)
Needed: Articles for The September 2015 edition of the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Remember: The ANA Massachusetts newsletter is read by about 110,000 RNs in the Commonwealth!
This is YOUR newsletter so we need YOU to make a contribution!
Deadline date for submission is July 10
Your contribution can be sent to newsletter@ANAMass.org
or mailed to ANA Massachusetts Newsletter, P. O. Box 285, Milton, MA 02186

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Now Open: Call for Nominations for Appointive Positions on ANA Committees and Boards
In 2014 the ANA Committee on Appointments (COA) adopted streamlined processes, including the implementation of an annual Call for Nominations for Appointive Positions. The general call for nominations for appointive positions on ANA committees and boards is now open until 5 p.m. ET on Friday July 31, 2015.
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SAVE THE DATE!
ANA Massachusetts 2015 Summer Event:
Nurses are Special…take time out to join us for a Day of Wellness!

Nurses always take care of others, so take a break and care for yourself!

Friday, Aug. 21, 2015
10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Danversport Yacht Club

Keynote — Sue R. Levy, Savory Living
Eating Well for YOU: behavior changes, nutrition science, food skills to help you feel well
MAKE HEALTHY EATING HAPPEN IN 2015
Start a sustainable approach to healthy eating that fits your tastes and lifestyle.

Luncheon Fashion Show sponsored by North Shore Chico’s!
Check out our very own members sporting the latest styles of the season!
    Wellness Session Breakouts:
    featuring demonstrations, consultation and free samples

    Salem Fitness Center
    Elements Massage Swampscott
    Whole Foods Market Swampscott
    Yoga sessions
    Essential Oils
Comfortable Sports Attire Encouraged
Registration Opening Soon!

Accredited Approver Unit Provider Symposium Western Workshop
Friday, Nov. 6, 2015

Baystate Health Conference Center, Holyoke, MA

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Become an active member!
Join the ANA Massachusetts Technology Committee

The overall goal of the committee is to identify and implement technological upgrades for the organization. Are you an ANA Massachusetts member who is looking for a way to become more involved in the organization? Do you have an interest or skill/expertise in IT and/or Technology projects. If you are looking for new opportunities, then we are looking for you! Contact info@anamass.org for more information
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Joint Alert from Division of Health Professions Licensure
In response to The National Transportation Safety Board safety study, Drug Use Trends in Aviation: Assessing the Risk of Pilot Impairment the Board of Registration in Dentistry, the Board of Registration in Nursing, Board of Registration in Pharmacy, and the Board of Registration of Physician Assistants, on behalf of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Division of Health Professions Licensure issued a joint alert regarding prescribing and dispensing controlled substances in November, 2014.
Click here to find an update to that original alert.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Study: More time between shifts help nurses recover
Safety + Health
Longer breaks between shifts can help nurses bounce back from the demands of work, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Researchers studied the effects of longer rest periods among 39 female shift-working nurses based on their heart rate variability, a sign of recovery. The number of their brief breaks – 11 hours or shorter – between shifts were cut in half. Before the change and one year later, researchers surveyed the nurses and noted their heart rate variability while at work, away from work and during sleep.
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Clinical decision rule can classify risk of chronic back pain
HealthDay News
A clinical decision rule (CDR) with eight items can classify patients with acute low back pain (LBP) by their risk for chronic pain, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The Spine Journal. Researchers conducted a prospective cohort study of risk factors for the progression to chronic pain. Six hundred five patients with acute LBP (≥30 days' duration) were included, and they were surveyed at baseline, six months and two years.
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Patient-controlled analgesia in the emergency department is effective, show twin studies
Medical Xpress
Patients who arrive at the emergency department (ED) in moderate or severe pain are often given intravenous morphine, administered by a nurse. This is safe and works in the short term but is demanding of nursing time, particularly when repeated doses of painkillers are necessary. One potential solution is for patients to administer their own pain relief using a patient controlled analgesia (PCA) device. A PCA device is a syringe usually containing morphine that can be connected to a drip in the patient's arm, which allows the patient to deliver their own pain relief by pressing a button.
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MISSED AN ISSUE OF THE ANA-MASSACHUSETTS NURSING FLASH?
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to visit The ANA-Mass. Nursing Flash archive page.


Study: More than two-thirds of US adults now overweight or obese
HealthDay News
Fewer than one-third of Americans are currently at a healthy weight, with the rest of the population either overweight or obese, a new report finds. About 35 percent of men and 37 percent of women are obese. Another 40 percent of men and 30 percent of women are overweight, researchers said in the June 22 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.
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OSHA launches program to protect nursing employees
NPR
The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will announce Thursday that it's going to crack down on hospitals, for the first time ever, to prevent an epidemic of back and arm injuries among nursing employees. Nurses and nursing assistants suffer more of those debilitating injuries than any other occupation, and those injuries are caused mainly by moving and lifting patients.
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Study: Drug combination offers hope for bipolar depression
USA Today
A new combination of pre-existing drugs may have unlocked a new treatment for bipolar depression, a Columbia University study released June 24 found. The study suggests a way to prolong the effects of ketamine, which has been shown to be helpful in treatment-resistant bipolar depression, but its effects don't usually last more than a week or two. The preliminary findings show on average a 50 percent reduction in symptoms of depression and a 75 percent reduction in the likelihood of patients committing suicide with treatment-resistant bipolar depression.
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Nursing research: Nurses know best
Nature
As a registered nurse who also holds a Ph.D., John Merriman is one of a small but growing number of nurse scientists worldwide. Many, like him, come to research because they see a problem in the clinic that needs a research-based solution. Nurse scientists arrive at a research-career path through a variety of trajectories; historically, many have begun their doctoral work mid- to late-career, after years of seeing patients. But that trend is shifting as leaders in the field encourage younger nurses to enter Ph.D. programs soon after earning a nursing degree and registered nurse certification.
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Dusting off drug libraries yields smarter IV pumps
Pharmacy Practice News
Partnering with nurses, conducting rounds on inpatient floors and continually educating staff are all ways that hospitals can improve drug library compliance for smart pumps, panelists said at a kick-off meeting for the National Coalition for Infusion Therapy Safety. This is an initiative by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) Foundation and industry partners to develop and promote solutions that improve infusion therapy–related patient outcomes.
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Putting stents to the test
The New York Times
Millions of Americans have had stents inserted in their coronary arteries to prop them open. And many are convinced the devices are protecting them from heart attacks. After all, a partly blocked artery is now cleared, and the pain in a heart muscle starved of blood often vanishes once the artery is open again. But while stents unquestionably save lives of patients in the throes of a heart attack or a threatened heart attack, there is no convincing evidence that stents reduce heart attack risk for people suffering from stable angina.
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Even slightly elevated blood pressure may pose problems for young adults
HealthDay News via Physician's Briefing
Young adults with even slightly elevated blood pressure may be at risk of cardiac dysfunction later in life, according to a new study published in the June 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Researchers followed 2,479 men and women over the course of 25 years. They were between 18 and 30 years old when the study began. The researchers found that participants who had slightly elevated blood pressure that was still considered within normal range when they were between 18 and 30 years old were more likely to have problems with their left ventricle once they reached middle age.
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New silk-based ink can detect bacteria, could enable 'smart' bandages
Med Device Online
A new bioink made from silk has successfully been printed onto hospital gloves and changes color when it comes into contact with certain kinds of bacteria. Researchers at Tufts University say that certain properties of the silk protect heat-sensitive biomolecules during the ink-jet printing process, and that the method could open the door to a host of new therapeutic, biosensor and regenerative medicine applications.
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Even with vaccination, pertussis outbreak could spread
Monthly Prescribing Reference
New research proposes that the source of a recent pertussis outbreak may not be due to vaccine efficacy or decreasing immunization, but instead from infected individuals who are vaccinated and asymptomatic. Researchers designed a model to build on those findings via evaluation of waning of protective immunity from vaccination or natural infection over time, evolution of B. pertussis to escape protective immunity, and low vaccine coverage.
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88 percent of nurses profit from mobile health apps, smartphone
mHealth Intelligence
From smartphones, tablets, and mobile health apps to telemedicine and remote monitoring tools, the advancement of healthcare technologies has stimulated the entire industry to improve population health outcomes and the quality of patient care. The smartphone, in particular, is making headway in the healthcare industry with the majority of nurses owning and utilizing the device in a medical setting.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Healthcare fraud and blowing the whistle (Keith Carlson)
Urgent care centers proliferate as popularity of retail health heats up (FierceHealthcare)
Communicating and managing the difficult airway (Anesthesiology News)
A sea change in treating heart attacks (The New York Times)
Study: Best practices for the primary care practice (By Christina Thielst)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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