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Nurses make ICU less intensive for family members
U-T San Diego
Patients with serious illness, injury or breathing problems need specialized care that hospitals can provide in an intensive care unit. For families and patients alike, the ICU can be both a frightening and comforting place. Frightening, because the patient is very sick and the outcome uncertain; and comforting, because the medical team provides constant care from the moment a patient arrives. Understanding the ICU is often helpful for patients and families during this stressful time.
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MARN NEWS & UPDATES


MARN invites you to a Holiday Networking Social
Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013
History of Nursing Archives
Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center\
at Boston University
771 Commonwealth Avenue
Mugar Memorial Library, First Floor
5:30 - 8 p.m.
$15.00 non-members
$10.00 MARN members
$5.00 students
Event Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.
Register by Dec. 5 to ensure a spot!
Please share with colleagues, staff, students and friends!

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VOTING NOW OPEN: MARN Special Election - ANA Membership Delegate
To go to on-line voting, click here.
The deadline for voting is Dec. 1, 2013.
Please note: If you do not know your membership number or if you would prefer a paper ballot, please call the MARN office 617-990-2856 or send an email to lpresutti@MARNonline.org

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Call for Proposed Changes to the MARN Bylaws
Reminder from the MARN Bylaws Committee that any proposed changes to the MARN Bylaws must be submitted in writing using the MARN Bylaws Change form no later than January 1, 2014.
MARN Bylaws, click here.
Proposed changes to Bylaws Form, click here.
Submit completed proposal to Bylaws Chair, Mary McKenzie at mjmarm@yahoo.com

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MARN Career Center
Check Out Great New Career Opportunities at the MARNCareerCenter here
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MARN 2013 Membership Survey
Please take a few minutes to complete our member survey so that we can better meet your member needs! Complete the survey and be entered into a drawing. We appreciate your time and your input!
Go to survey, click here.

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BORN Advisory Ruling Rescission and Issuance
Rescind both Advisory Ruling 0101: Medical Aesthetic Procedures and
Advisory Ruling 0001: Non-Ablative and Non-Laser Sources Device Use
and issue Advisory Ruling 1301: Cosmetic and Dermatologic Procedures
Full Advisory, click here

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Smart glasses maker moves closer to making vein hunting easier for nurses
Business Journal
The most nerve-wracking part of a hospital stay can be the hunt for elusive veins — when the medical professional searches, sometimes painfully, for a usable vessel in your arm to start an IV. Evena Medical’s Eye-On Glasses allow nurses and doctors to “see” veins under your skin, with the blood flowing in real time. Senior Technology Reporter Cromwell Schubarth introduced you to Evena in "The Pitch" last year when it was seeking funding and demonstrating a prototype.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  JBI Evidence-Based Practice Resources - exclusively on Ovid!

Advance healthcare using content and tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), a global leader in evidence-based practice, only on Ovid. Search evidence in any specialty including systematic reviews, recommended practices, evidence summaries, patient handouts and more. Then use JBI's unique tools to get evidence into practice.
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Private website touted as interim alternative to HealthCare.gov
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Despite doubts from many, President Barack Obama remains confident that the technical glitches that overshadowed the launch of the federal health insurance exchange in October will be fixed by Nov. 30. Obama said while the site was getting better each week, supporters should remind their friends and family that HealthCare.gov isn't the only place consumers could enroll for insurance. He said enrollment could happen over the phone, in person and by mail. What Obama didn't mention was that there is also an alternative website where consumers could shop for plans. And it's gaining a lot of attention.
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High costs cause healthcare access problems for Americans
EHR Intelligence
In a poll with few surprises, the latest Commonwealth Fund international survey crowns the United States with the dubious honor of being the most expensive country for healthcare. More Americans experience problems accessing basic healthcare due to the cost of services than residents of ten other countries including Canada, France, the U.K., and the Netherlands. Americans spend $8,508 per capita on healthcare when adjusted for differences in cost of living, compared to $5,669 for Norway, the next most expensive, and $3,182 in New Zealand, which is the cheapest.
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SHOWCASE
  Degree & Certification Programs for Nurses

Rowan University offers programs in healthcare designed to accommodate your busy schedule including:

Combination Online & Face-to-face Classes
B.S. in Nursing for registered nurses
School Nursing Certification
M.S. in Nursing: Clinical Nurse Leader
  Online Classes
M.A. in Wellness and Lifestyle Management
Ed. D. in Educational Leadership: Nurse Educator track

Apply Now!
 


Rotavirus vaccine may also prevent related infant seizures
Medscape (free subscription)
A full course of rotavirus vaccine administered to infants may reduce the risk for rotavirus-related seizures by as much as 21 percent during the year after vaccination, according to an article published online Nov. 21 in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The finding suggests an additional, surprising benefit of the vaccine intended to protect infants against intestinal infections caused by rotavirus, the researchers write.
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  FEATURED COMPANIES
RN-BSN & 2nd Degree BSN

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Stress test chemicals could cause heart attacks and death, FDA warns
The Huffington Post
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned physicians on Wednesday that two chemicals used to conduct cardiovascular stress tests can cause heart attacks and death, and it suggested resuscitation equipment and trained staff be available when the tests are conducted. The injectable products, Lexiscan and Adenoscan, are marketed by Astellas Pharma US Inc. They work by stressing the heart, allowing physicians to take images that can show areas of low blood flow and damaged heart muscle. The tests are given to patients who are physically unable to exercise.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study finds youth prefer and benefit more from rapid point-of-care HIV testing
redOrbit
Youth prefer, accept and receive HIV results more often when offered rapid finger prick or saliva swab tests rather than traditional blood tests according to a study by researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital. More than 50 per cent of youths who took part in 14 North American studies preferred the rapid point-of-care tests because they are less invasive and provide faster results, said family physician Dr. Suzanne Turner.

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Hypertension treatment flowchart fills in for missing guideline
Forbes
When the AHA and the ACC released four updated clinical guidelines earlier this week, a fifth document, the hypertension guideline, was conspicuous by its absence. According to the AHA and the ACC, the authors of the hypertension document have chosen to publish it independently.

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Study finds improving lighting patterns could help hospital patients
Nurse.com
Changing the lighting patterns in hospital rooms to make the rooms more aligned with normal sleep-wake cycles could help patients feel better with less fatigue and pain, according to a study. Researchers said the findings, published Oct. 27 on the website of the Journal of Advanced Nursing, point to a simple and inexpensive way to potentially improve patient care.

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Study: Involving patients in nurses' shift change improves outcomes, prevents errors
FierceHealthcare
When incoming and outgoing nurses actively involve their patients in shift changes — a practice known as bedside handover — it can reduce medical errors and improve outcomes and patient experience, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nursing Care Quality. "The start and end of a nurse's shift are critical moments," lead author Lianne Jeffs, Ph.D., volunteer association chair in nursing research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, said in a statement.
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Technology and medicine: Applying Google Glass in the medical field
By Rosemary Sparacio
Every day, new strides in technology make headlines in all kinds of areas. Nowhere is it is more prevalent or exciting than in the medical field. And one of the most talked about new tech "gadgets" to come onto the scene and into the consciousness of just about everyone who follows the news is Google Glass. The last few months have seen story after story about Goggle Glass being used by physicians. But as far back as a year ago, when Pelu Tran, a third-year medical student at Stanford, and Ian Shakil, a consultant at a West Coast start-up, saw and tried out Google Glass, they realized that the implications in medicine alone would be compelling. So much so that they founded a startup exclusively to investigate the use of Glass for medicine.
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Nursing scholar helps develop new ostomy care resource
redOrbit
Nurses caring for ostomy patients will now be equipped with an essential new tool that provides them with the first comprehensive guide to optimize ostomy management and enhance patient safety. Janice Beitz, a professor at the Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden, was part of a research team that developed the ostomy algorithm, a step-by-step aid that allows nurses to properly assess ostomy patients and their needs. “The majority of ostomy care is provided by non-specialized clinicians or caregivers and family members who do not have ostomy care expertise,” Beitz says. “There is a clear need for evidence-based guidelines in this area.”
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Glaucoma and birth control pills: Seeing the big picture
Everyday Health
Hormonal contraception is the most common prescription medication used by healthy young women so it’s always disconcerting to hear that there may be a serious health consequence as a result. Researchers reported that women who take oral contraceptives for three years or more are more than twice as likely to develop glaucoma, which can cause blindness if untreated.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Hospitals may be disappearing in the era of healthcare reform (Forbes)
Nurses seeking limit on patients (Eagle-Tribune)
What's the best way to treat obesity? New guidelines show the way to lose weight (Medical Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

MARN Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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