Tech Insights
Feb. 13, 2013

Highly anticipated executive order on cybersecurity signed
The Hill
President Barack Obama recently signed an executive order aimed at bolstering the cyberdefenses of the country's critical infrastructure. The highly anticipated cyber order intends to improve information sharing about cyberthreats between government and industry and establish a framework of cybersecurity best practices that industry would elect to follow. The White House spent the last several months crafting the order after Congress failed to pass cybersecurity legislation last year.More

MTBC Chairman's Circle members get sneak peak of George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum
MTBC
MTBC Chairman's Circle members will be privy to an exclusive sneak peak of what the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum will look like when open from facility director Alan Lowe. Located on the SMU campus in Dallas, the library and museum is scheduled to open May 1. This latest edition is the most technologically advanced presidential library in the U.S.More

Make international connections in Spain and France
MTBC
MTBC companies have an opportunity to make connections with technology companies in Barcelona, Spain, and the Provence region of France. Mike Skelton, on the MTBC staff and directing international activities for the Richardson Economic Development Partnership, will be traveling to Spain and France in February and March, respectively, to establish partnerships with technology companies and associations. Both of these regions are rich in wireless and telecommunications technologies.More

Blog: Media portrayal of women in science, technology, engineering and math
MTBC
Recently, Kelly Stark, principal at Forward Vision Marketing LLC, attended an MTBC tech industry luncheon and was pleased to meet several other women in technology. Unfortunately, the perception of the number of women in technology is well below the reality for the general public. Part of the misguided perception lies in the unbalanced portrayal of technology women in the media. As a fellow woman in technology and the media, Stark wants to emphasize the impact that the media has had on women in science, technology, engineering and math jobs.More

CDW: Personal cloud use influences corporate adoption
Datamation
How employees use cloud services and mobile devices on their personal time is having a major impact on their companies' decisions to adopt cloud computing in the U.S., according to CDW's "2013 State of the Cloud Report." In a survey of 1,242 of IT professionals, 73 percent of respondents said that personal cloud and mobile use by employees has "significantly influenced" cloud uptake by their organizations. It helps that employees are being more vocal about the matter.More

Samsung girds for life after Apple in disruption devotion
Bloomberg
Samsung Electronics Co.'s reclusive chairman has long warned employees against complacency and obsolescence. "Change everything except your wife and kids," Lee Kun Hee told them in 1993, charting a course that would turn a $2 billion maker of cheap TVs into the $200 billion giant it is today. Two decades on, his message remains the same: "Forget about the past and start anew," Lee exhorted employees in his New Year's address on Jan. 2. "We must search out new businesses that Samsung's survival depends on."More

What happens when the Internet reaches its limit?
Scientific American via Salon
The number of smartphones, tablets and other network-connected gadgets will outnumber humans by the end of the year. Perhaps more significantly, the faster and more powerful mobile devices hitting the market annually are producing and consuming content at unprecedented levels. Global mobile data grew 70 percent in 2012, according to a recent report from Cisco, which makes a lot of the gear that runs the Internet. Yet the capacity of the world's networking infrastructure is finite, leaving many to wonder when we will hit the upper limit, and what to do when that happens.More

Lean IT: Think big about agility
InformationWeek
There's been a lot of talk about agility lately. Everyone, it seems, wants their company to be a circus acrobat: nimble, capable of improbable feats of derring-do. Dozens of "big ideas" have put on the mantle of agility in the hopes of convincing the world they're the answer to the sluggishness of big organizations. The problem is that none of these ideas is a panacea; rather, each is a piece of a bigger puzzle, that of transforming an organization into an organism. Let's look at a few of these agile claimants first.More

Robotics make self-service business easier than ever
Greenbang
The singularity is coming. Or is it the Terminator? Or maybe, at long last, we're on our way to Jetsons-style, automation, where Rosie the Robot handles all the drudgery, freeing up humans to enjoy the good and easy life. In this article are just a few of the many companies offering advanced, IT-enabled self-service and robotic technologies for businesses, governments, educational institutions and other organizations.More

TI, AT&T, BlackBerry, Ericsson on patent powerhouse list
Dallas Business Journal
Texas Instruments, AT&T Inc., Ericsson, BlackBerry and Exxon Mobil have some of the biggest and most dominant patent portfolios in the United States. That's according to a joint study by the British journal Intellectual Asset Management and MDB Capital Group, an investment bank focused on intellectual property.More

The secret to tackling mobile, cloud and big data? Treat them as 1
GigaOM
There is widespread agreement — across the globe and in every industry — that mobile, big data and cloud computing are the three cornerstone issues of tomorrow's business environment. In fact, a strong organizational response to each of these issues is already critical to competitive survival. As a result, CIOs, business strategists and IT leaders are working furiously to make sure their businesses have plans in place to stay ahead of these challenges. But there is one subtlety that is frequently overlooked: When it comes to mobile computing, big data and the cloud, what we have is not three problems but one.More

Regulations and the cloud: HIPAA modification provides clarity
IDG
Many regulatory requirements that impact cloud computing were enacted before cloud computing came into existence. As a result, they don't directly or effectively address issues that can arise because of the cloud, leaving both client organizations and cloud vendors without clear guidance on how to comply. While such laws are typically updated at a much slower pace than the cloud evolves, now that the cloud is becoming more established, some regulations are starting to catch up. A case in point is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.More

3 deep, dark secrets of cloud computing
CIO
The promise of cloud computing is that you, the customer, doesn't ever have to buy another server, back up another disk drive or worry about another software upgrade. All those promises are true — and now there are multimillion-dollar companies without a single server closet. Unfortunately, too often cloud applications and services are bought by people who really shouldn't be buying. Sure, they may have the budget — did you hear Gartner's prediction that the CMO will spend more on tech than the CIO by 2017? But that doesn't mean they necessarily have the training to make good IT decisions, let alone the discipline or skills in their underlings to actually execute a coordinated technology strategy.More