Tech Insights
Apr. 23, 2014

MTBC partners with UT Dallas interns to launch major STEM program
MTBC
The University of Texas at Dallas computer science and engineering students are helping launch a program designed to fire up interest in the STEM fields among area K-12 students. STEMfire aims to nurture a pipeline of young students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields and prepares them for college and careers at technology corporations. The project will be implemented by school districts in the North Texas area and corporate members of the Metroplex Technology Business Council in the fall.More

Tech Titans nominations now open
MTBC
The MTBC is accepting nominations for the 2014 Tech Titans awards. Tech Titans recognize the most elite in North Texas technology — individuals currently transforming the high-tech industry and giving companies that competitive edge, as well as companies leading the way. The Tech Titans showcase the innovators, adopters and executors impacting the technology industry for the greater good. Nominate yourself, a colleague, your company or even a client. Nominations are due by 5:30 p.m. on Monday, May 19.More

Dallas lures 2 budding tech outfits
The Dallas Morning News
The Dallas startup community is continuing to grow after two businesses moved here after participating in a new program for entrepreneurs. True Mileage and inProximity, part of the inaugural class of AccelerateNFC, say they decided to move to Dallas because of the region's startup activity and wealth of business resources.More

New international business incubator launches in Richardson
The Dallas Morning News
North Texas-based Chinese-American entrepreneurs have launched a program for startups interested in international markets. DFW Excellerator combines the elements of incubator, accelerator and coworking space, where the region's entrepreneurs can seek mentors, investors and seed money.More

Personalizing the smartphone experience: A new crop of technologies are powering individualized apps and ads
Business Insider
The way consumers discover and absorb information has transformed dramatically thanks to mobile devices. The ability to be relayed information anytime, anywhere and to hold dozens of apps in the palm of your hand has made content discovery and search inherently personal.More

A swarm of ant-sized robots — at your service
The New York Times
While the robots imagined in science fiction novels have often looked like humans, today's robotic armies are emerging in all shapes and sizes. Take the little army of bots made by SRI International, called "Magnetically Actuated Micro-Robots," that are designed to build small things on small scales. They look like a swarm of ants, and they can be controlled by a central computer.More

8 gadgets for the high-tech home
InformationWeek
A new day is dawning for those of you who've dreamed of being both more efficient and lazier with your household gadgets and appliances. The barriers to entry for the "connected home" fall as the Internet of Things vision comes to life. Network bandwidth is widely available, and traditional home appliances are being rebuilt to connect to the Internet via Wi-Fi and other wireless protocols. Smartphones and tablets double as remote controls for appliances ranging from light bulbs to thermostats to speakers.More

The rise of big data brings tremendous possibilities and frightening perils
The Washington Post
Debates are raging about whether big data still holds the promise that was expected or whether it was just a big bust. The failure of the much-hyped Google Flu Trends to accurately predict peak flu levels since August 2011 has heightened the concerns.More

Stolen passwords used in most data breaches
InformationWeek
Cybercriminals and cyberspies mostly log in to steal data: Findings from the new and much-anticipated "2014 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report" show that 2 out of 3 breaches involved attackers using stolen or misused credentials.More

The 3-D printing landfill of opportunity
TechCrunch
There are lots of reasons to love 3-D printing. It democratizes manufacturing, putting consumers in granular control of the things they own — rather than requiring them to choose from a finite pre-made selection.More

Tech accelerator, incubator, coworking space to launch in Richardson
Dallas Business Journal
A new technology accelerator, incubator and coworking space soon will be available in Richardson. Tech entrepreneur Jason Liu will host the grand opening for his new program, DFW Excellerator, April 18 and 19. More

The 39 most important people in cloud computing
Business Insider
Read about influential people in cloud computing, including MTBC Tech Titan Lance Crosby. Cloud computing is changing the world. It's the invisible part of your smartphone and tablet, the part that holds your apps and files, and lets you work from anywhere.More

Searching the planet to find power for the cloud
NPR
You hear the term "the cloud" or "cloud computing," and you picture something puffy, white, clean and quiet. Cloud computing is anything but. Even from a distance you can hear the hum of a modern data center. More

Even good employees hoard great ideas
CEO.com
One of the most heated debates involving innovation revolves around how to best incentivize people to develop and implement new ideas. Research on this issue offers a wide range of conclusions. For example, one recent research report suggested that offering financial incentives only raised the number of mediocre ideas and had little impact on breakthrough innovation. On the other hand, an MIT study concluded that group incentives and long-term rewards do have a positive impact on innovation. And still another survey of 20 companies from different industries found that 90 percent of the respondents thought that incentivizing and rewarding innovation was "something we should be doing better."More

The 3-D printing landfill of opportunity
TechCrunch
There are lots of reasons to love 3-D printing. It democratizes manufacturing, putting consumers in granular control of the things they own — rather than requiring them to choose from a finite pre-made selection.More