Tech Insights
Jul. 23, 2014

Tech Titans finalists announced
MTBC
Forty-three individuals and organizations are one step closer to joining an elite group of people known as the best of the best in the North Texas technology industry. The Metroplex Technology Business Council has announced the finalists for the 2014 Tech Titans awards. Four finalists were selected in each of 11 categories. One in each category will be crowned a Tech Titan at the Tech Titans gala, Friday, Aug. 22, at the Hotel InterContinental Dallas.More

MTBC-advocated legislation about workforce development becomes law
MTBC
The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act — a key piece of federal workforce legislation the MTBC advocated for — will be signed into law by President Barack Obama this month. The new law seeks to update the nation's workforce development system and replaces the Workforce Investment Act, which has been overdue for reauthorization for more than a decade.More

New members - June
MTBC
Thank you to the MTBC members who either joined or renewed their memberships in June. Our members are the lifeline of our organization and serve to make us stronger and more successful. We hope you will join us in welcoming these new members, doing business with them and referring other members to the MTBC.More

What cloud computing customers want: clarity, simplicity, support
Forbes
The lines between cloud providers and cloud consumers keep getting fuzzier every day. Many enterprises are engaged in both offering services through their own clouds, as well as subscribing to cloud services from public providers. To meet the consumption side of the equation, there is now a mega-industry of public cloud service providers that are aggressively competing for this online market. Vendors within this mega-industry are overwhelming customers with a bewildering assortment of pricing plans and service level agreements.More

How the cloud and big data are changing small business
Forbes
Big data and the cloud have a profound impact on business operations in almost any industry today, allowing companies of all sizes to more effectively serve customers, perform risk-analyses and create new revenue streams. In its recent CEO Survey and Technology Forecast, PricewaterhouseCoopers identified these tools, along with mobile and social apps, as transformative technologies that are not only impacting traditional businesses but creating new ones.More

The Internet of Things has a language problem
Motherboard
If it seems that everything around you is "smart" now, just give it five years, when it's predicted there'll be 50 billion connected devices out in the world. That communicative thermostat you thought was so clever will just be one device in your smart home of ubiquitous connectivity. But while the potential for smart everything has developers in a frenzy, there's another shining opportunity for development: the protocols these products use to communicate.More

Internet of Things: security for a world of ubiquitous computing
InformationWeek
Security practitioners within corporate IT are rightly focusing on the emerging risks presented by laptops, tablets and smartphones when used by employees and contractors in the course of doing business. But other trends are developing all around us that challenge the foundations of our security assumptions. For example, while worrying about employee behavior at work, we can lose sight of the fact that computing is becoming part of daily life in such a way that it's nearly impossible to separate "work" and "personal" activities and devices.More

How 'Star Wars' influenced Jibo, the first robot for families
Fast Company
Cynthia Breazeal traces her interest in robotics to the first time she saw Star Wars in theaters as a 10-year-old. "Your jaw just drops," she told Fast Company. "In many ways those droids were full-fledged characters; they cared about people. That was what, I think, really sparked my imagination." George Lucas's fictional characters convinced her that people want to interact with machines as if they are human.More

Hasbro won't mind if you design (and sell) your own 3-D printed toys
Gizmodo
The advent of online file sharing made it easy for anyone to copy and distribute media for free, and many feel — and fear — that 3-D printing will eventually do the same for physical products. So it's surprisingly refreshing to hear that a corporation like Hasbro has decided to embrace 3-D printing by working with Shapeways to allow fans to design and sell their own toys based on the company's properties.More

Cybersecurity guide to the 10 most disruptive enterprise technologies
InformationAge
Deploying the latest and greatest technologies in an enterprise is one of the most effective ways of gaining competitive advantage, increasing efficiency, attracting the best talent and, ultimately, driving new business and growth. The pace of innovation has never been quicker than it is today, and it is the CIO's job to understand which solutions are most aligned to the business goals of their organization and which to bat away. Most challenging of all, however, is the ability to embrace the trends disrupting the status quo whilst also ensuring the organization is protected from cyberthreats.More

Tech Titans finalists announced
MTBC
Forty-three individuals and organizations are one step closer to joining an elite group of people known as the best of the best in the North Texas technology industry. The Metroplex Technology Business Council has announced the finalists for the 2014 Tech Titans awards. Four finalists were selected in each of 11 categories. One in each category will be crowned a Tech Titan at the Tech Titans gala, Friday, Aug. 22, at the Hotel InterContinental Dallas.More

Cloud and the fuzzy math of shadow IT
InformationWeek
Organizations are adopting the cloud in a big way. Today, representing about 23 percent of IT spend, cloud computing has accelerated because it allows people to get their jobs done more quickly, more easily and more flexibly than they can using traditional computing tools. Set to account for 60 percent of cloud services in 2017, software-as-a-service has proliferated in enterprises and has now reached a tipping point. More

Restaurateurs serving up a side order of technology
The Dallas Morning News
Some of the largest casual dining chains are rolling out tabletop tablets that can eliminate some of the pain of dining out. At the same time, they're looking at upgrades that can allow restaurant technology to work with the consumer's own smartphone. In April, Dallas-based Chili's Grill & Bar became the largest casual dining chain to roll out tabletop technology.More

IT career advice: how to sell
InformationWeek
In the U.S. today, only about 80 out of more than 2,900 four-year colleges or universities offer a curriculum in sales, yet 50 percent of graduates from these schools end up in a sales career. How is this fact relevant to those of us in information technology? Well, many tech pros in the corporate world find themselves woefully undertrained in the essential skill of knowing how to sell an idea or a project effectively, so here are some tips.More

5 lies leaders tell themselves
Inc. via Business Insider
Business leaders and entrepreneurs tend to get stuck trying to expand their companies to new levels because of these five lies they tell themselves.More

How to keep your rock star employees from burning out
Dallas Business Journal
Congratulations! You've nailed your recruitment strategy, hired some of the best professionals in the business and lead them to work hard, drive results and sacrifice for the success of the company. So why did some of your rock stars just walk out the door, citing "burnout?"More