Managed Care e-News
Apr. 2, 2013

California gets fed nod for largest 'dual eligible' plan
Dow Jones Newswires via Fox Business
California has secured federal approval for the largest state-based program yet aimed at testing a new way to care for people on both the Medicare and Medicaid government health programs. More

Local health-insurance marketplaces struggle to get people enrolled
Kaiser Health News via The Washington Post
Veterans of past efforts to enroll the uninsured say that outreach often takes far longer than might be expected and that it needs to happen not just through television and radio advertising but through trusted individuals in the community. Of course, the federal health law is different because most Americans will be required to have coverage under the law beginning Jan. 1. But the initial penalty of $95 or 1 percent of income, whichever is higher, is likely to be too low to have much impact, many experts say.More

3 years on, states still struggle with healthcare law messaging
WBUR
VideoBriefIt is hard to imagine that after three years of acrimony and debate we could still be so confused about President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Is it actually possible Americans know less about Obamacare now than they did three years ago? Apparently that is the case, and the news comes just as the most sweeping effects of the law are about to kick in.More

FDA warns against getting temporary tattoos
The Boston Globe
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against a dangerous practice that many college kids engage in while on vacation — getting a temporary tattoo. These typically last from three days to several weeks and use a dye such as henna to tint the skin, without piercing the skin's surface as with a permanent tattoo. "Just because a tattoo is temporary it doesn't mean that it is risk-free," said Dr. Linda Katz, director of the FDA's Office of Cosmetics and Colors. Some consumers report reactions that may be severe and long outlast the temporary tattoos themselves.More

Using Internet search logs can help identify drug interactions
HealthDay News
Search logs can be used to inexpensively mine for anonymized signals that may alert authorities to potential drug interactions and add new Web-scale pharmacovigilance capabilities, according to research. Researchers conducted a large-scale study of Web search log data gathered in 2010 to determine whether early clues about a drug's adverse events might emerge from evaluating search terms. More

Take the plunge: Incorporating a water-based fitness class
By Connie Harrison Lagerhausen
Water fitness classes burn as many calories as their land-based counter parts, although they might not feel as taxing. According to the Aquatic Exercise Association, two factors work to increase your effort, while minimizing perceived exertion. First, the increased density of water makes you work harder to do the same movements you do on land. Second, the cooling effect of water and the way it supports your joints and body weight lessens the perception of the effort made.More

Full vaccine schedule safe for kids, no link to autism
USA Today
At least 10 percent of parents of young children skip or delay routine vaccinations, often out of concern that kids are getting "too many shots, too soon." But a new study finds that children who receive the full schedule of vaccinations have no increased risk of autism. The study is the latest of more than 20 studies showing no connection between autism and vaccines, given either individually or as part of the standard schedule. The paper is the first to consider not just the number of vaccines, but a child's total exposure to the substances inside vaccines that trigger an immune response.More

Scientists find new gene markers for cancer risk
The Associated Press via ABC News
A huge international effort involving more than 100 institutions and genetic tests on 200,000 people has uncovered dozens of signposts in DNA that can help reveal further a person's risk for breast, ovarian or prostate cancer, scientists reported.More

Take the plunge: Incorporating a water-based fitness class
By Connie Harrison Lagerhausen
Water fitness classes burn as many calories as their land-based counter parts, although they might not feel as taxing.More

Managed-care firms prepare to cash in on Medicaid overhaul
Tampa Bay Times
When they voted to kill the Medicaid expansion recently, Republican lawmakers knocked the government-run insurance program as flawed, costly and out of control.More

Who are the uninsured? The feds parse the numbers
Kaiser Health News
There are 48.4 million uninsured Americans — about 18 percent of the population — according to the last Census. But who are they?More

Genetics may determine who becomes a heavy smoker
Fox News
Individuals who pick up smoking as teenagers have a much higher risk of becoming heavy smokers as adults. And for some, the risk is even greater — depending on their genetics. A team of researchers from the United States, the U.K. and New Zealand utilized previous research on genetics and smoking to develop a genetic risk profile for individuals who eventually become heavy smokers. More

Cutting copays may increase women's cancer screening
INFORUM
More women may get screened for breast and cervical cancers if they don't have to pay for the tests, according to a new study from Japan. A year after the Japanese government started picking up the tab for Pap smears and mammograms for certain groups of women, the percentage of eligible women who got screened nearly doubled compared to a few years earlier when most women had to pay for screenings.More

Full vaccine schedule safe for kids, no link to autism
USA Today
At least 10 percent of parents of young children skip or delay routine vaccinations, often out of concern that kids are getting "too many shots, too soon." But a new study finds that children who receive the full schedule of vaccinations have no increased risk of autism. The study is the latest of more than 20 studies showing no connection between autism and vaccines, given either individually or as part of the standard schedule. The paper is the first to consider not just the number of vaccines, but a child's total exposure to the substances inside vaccines that trigger an immune response.More

Parent training tops meds in ADHD
MedPage Today
Parent behavior training topped medication and other interventions for preschool children at risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a systematic literature review showed. Eight methodologically sound studies of PBT produced the best and most consistent strength of evidence for efficacy, with a standard mean difference of -0.68, researchers reported.More