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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jan. 7, 2014

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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

It's time to rethink health insurance
Los Angeles Times
As the acute problems of the Affordable Care Act become increasingly apparent, it also has become clear that we need new ways of ensuring access to healthcare for all Americans. We should begin with an examination of health insurance. Insurance is about protecting against risk. In the health arena, the risk at issue is of large and unexpected medical expenses.
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Millions gaining health coverage under law
The New York Times
Millions of Americans will begin receiving health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act after years of contention and a rollout hobbled by delays and technical problems. The decisively new moment in the effort to overhaul the country's healthcare system will test the law's central premise: That extending coverage to far more Americans will improve the nation's health and help many avoid crippling medical bills.
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Food for thought: Exercise your optimism muscle
By Karen Childress
If you routinely hear phrases like "Why are you so negative?" coming from people who know you well — your spouse, practice partner, office manager or even your children — it may be time to work on building up your optimism muscle. Deep-seated optimism goes beyond simply the ability to maintain a sunny, hopeful outlook on life. You can learn to be more optimistic and doing so, according to numerous studies, can result in improved health, better relationships with others and even greater longevity.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

Get CEUs and Safety Training for your Nurses and Case Managers! Group rates available! CareerSmart offers online CEUs and safety training applicable for Nurses, Case Managers and other healthcare professionals. They are designed to help staff prevent work-related injuries and maintain compliance with mandated continuing education requirements.
 


Want to get published?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Managed Care eNews, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of NAMCP, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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Healthcare? There's an app for that
Bloomberg
Chrysalis Ventures and David Jones discuss technology and healthcare on Bloomberg Television's "In The Loop."
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Sanofi MS drug added with genzyme fails to win FDA approval
Bloomberg Businessweek
Sanofi failed to win U.S. regulatory approval for its multiple sclerosis drug Lemtrada, denting the company's ambitions of capturing a larger share of the $20 billion market for the disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Sanofi's Genzyme unit didn't submit evidence from "adequate and well-controlled studies" showing that the benefits of Lemtrada outweigh its side effects, the Paris-based company said in a statement.
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FDA warns dietary supplements do not cure concussions
Medical Daily
Concussions have become a hot-button issue raising fear over its possible detrimental health outcomes. Profiting on public concern, dietary supplement firms have marketed a series of products that claim to prevent, treat or cure concussions and other traumatic brain injuries, despite the lack of scientific evidence.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Turning off 'aging genes'
ScienceDaily
Restricting calorie consumption is one of the few proven ways to combat aging. Though the underlying mechanism is unknown, calorie restriction has been shown to prolong lifespan in yeast, worms, flies, monkeys and, in some studies, humans. Now Keren Yizhak, a doctoral student in Prof. Eytan Ruppin's laboratory at Tel Aviv University's Blavatnik School of Computer Science, and her colleagues have developed a computer algorithm that predicts which genes can be "turned off" to create the same anti-aging effect as calorie restriction.
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'Jumping genes' linked to schizophrenia
LiveScience
Some so-called jumping genes that copy and paste themselves throughout the genome may be linked to schizophrenia, new research suggests. The new study, published in the journal Neuron, suggests these jumping genes may alter how neurons (or nerve cells in the brain) form during development, thereby increasing the risk of schizophrenia, study co-author Dr. Tadafumi Kato, a neurobiologist at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, wrote in an email.
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Humans may have fewer genes than worms
Popular Science
Once upon a time in the 1960s, scientists thought the human genome might contain as many as 2 million genes, units of DNA that code for proteins. But ever since then, the estimated number has been steadily shrinking. A new study suggests that the human genome could contain as few as 19,000 protein-coding genes, fewer than nematode worms.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Man eats only McDonald's, loses 37 pounds
TIME via Fox News
After eating only McDonald's for three months, Iowa science teacher John Cisna lost 37 pounds and saw his cholesterol level drop significantly, Time.com reported. No, this wasn't another documentary experiment like 2004's Super Size Me — it was a school science experiment.
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CDC: Flu widespread in US, young urged to get vaccinated
Reuters via WINA-Radio
Nearly half of the United States is reporting widespread influenza activity, most of it attributed to the H1N1 virus that caused a worldwide pandemic in 2009, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Thousands of people die every year from flu, which peaks in the United States between October and March. The flu is spreading quickly this season, with 25 states already reporting cases, the CDC said.
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Brain rest after concussion linked to quicker recovery
Reuters
Most U.S. health authorities recommend people who've suffered a concussion give their brain a break while they recover, but there hadn't been strong data to support that. A new study provides some of the first evidence showing "cognitive rest" does make a difference.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
It's time to rethink health insurance
Los Angeles Times
As the acute problems of the Affordable Care Act become increasingly apparent, it also has become clear that we need new ways of ensuring access to healthcare for all Americans.

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read more
Hospitals threaten Obamacare savings by exiting program
Bloomberg
Almost a third of 32 hospitals and health systems involved in an experiment aimed at changing the way medical providers are paid may exit the program, a potential threat to the Affordable Care Act's ambitious cost-saving goals.

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The most efficient healthcare systems in the world
The Huffington Post
As supporters and opponents of the Affordable Care Act debate the best way to overhaul a clearly broken healthcare system, it's perhaps helpful to put American medicine in a global perspective.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Why everyone seems to have cancer
The New York Times
Every New Year when the government publishes its report to the nation on the status of cancer, it is followed by a familiar lament. We are losing the war against cancer. Half a century ago, the story goes, a person was far more likely to die from heart disease. Now cancer is on the verge of overtaking it as the No. 1 cause of death.
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Ovarian cancer: combination therapy using decitabine 'effective'
Medical News Today
Women with recurrent ovarian cancer showed clinical benefit when treated with a drug called decitabine before undergoing chemotherapy and a cancer vaccine. This is according to a new study published in the journal Cancer Immunology Research. The research team, led by Dr. Kunle Odunsi of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., say their findings suggest that this combination of "chemoimmunotherapy" could give patients with ovarian cancer a new treatment option for the disease.
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6 cancer centers to share $540 million research gift
USA Today
In one of the largest-ever donations to cancer research, Ludwig Cancer Research of New York City announced that it is contributing $540 million to try to resolve continuing mysteries about how cancer starts, spreads and can be thwarted. The unrestricted money for six cancer research centers established by earlier Ludwig donations is intended as a final gift from the philanthropy founded by the late Daniel Ludwig, a shipping magnate and real estate owner, which has now contributed $2.5 billion globally to cancer research.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Study: Fear of childbirth linked to postpartum depression
Los Angeles Times
Although a history of depression among expectant mothers remains the greatest single risk factor for postpartum depression, a new study finds that fear of childbirth may also predispose some women to the condition. In a paper published in the journal BMJ Open, researchers concluded that fear of childbirth increases the risk of postpartum depression about threefold in women without a history of depression, and fivefold in women with known depressive disease.
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Medicare to cover more mental health costs
The New York Times
For decades, older adults with depression, anxiety and other psychological conditions have received unequal treatment under Medicare. The program paid a smaller share of the bill for therapy from psychiatrists, psychologists or clinical social workers than it did for medical services.
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5 important reasons to stop ignoring your mental health
The Huffington Post
When we come down with a cold, most of us don't hesitate to pop a pill or visit the doctor. But if we can't seem to shake our endless worries or that nagging sense of hopelessness, we plug along as though nothing is wrong.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is this the end of health insurers? (The Washington Post)
How big is the penalty if you don't get health insurance? (Forbes)
The Affordable Care Act: They gave it the wrong name (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
The culprit behind high US healthcare prices (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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