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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Feb. 4, 2014

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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Attracting young adults to insurance exchanges proves difficult
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After a slow and rocky start, the state and federal health insurance exchanges seem to finally be taking off. By the end of December, enrollment surpassed the 3 million mark for state and federal marketplaces combined. But young adults — who many claim are key to the success of the Affordable Care Act — haven't been as eager as their older counterparts to enroll. Adults between the ages of 18 and 34 make up 40 percent of the potential market for exchange plans. But a recent report by the Department of Health and Human Services shows they only accounted for a quarter of total enrollees.
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10 places where health insurance costs the most
NPR
If you are buying health coverage in the Colorado ski resort towns, the Connecticut suburbs of New York City or a bunch of otherwise low-cost rural regions of Georgia, Mississippi and Nevada, you have the misfortune of living in the most expensive insurance marketplaces under the new health law. The 10 most expensive regions also include all of Alaska and Vermont and large parts of Wisconsin and Wyoming.
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Study: EHR beliefs tied to gender, personality
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
It's an established fact that for technology implementation to be successful, there needs to be some flexibility in order to meet the individual needs of those learning the new systems. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a survey of 126 third-year medical schools to determine which personal characteristics related to their perceptions of electronic health record systems. Among their findings was that men were more likely than women to report that EHRs were easy to use. But some officials caution that it would be bad to place people in groups based on gender, culture or personality.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Pfizer breast cancer drug hits midstage study goal
The Associated Press via ABC News
Drugmaker Pfizer Inc. said that a midstage study of its experimental drug for advanced breast cancer, palbociclib, met the main goal. The world's second-biggest drugmaker said the drug, combined with another medicine called letrozole, increased the time patients survived without tumors growing, compared with women just getting letrozole.
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Hepatitis C treatment shifts as new drugs emerge
USA Today
John Billeris has tried and failed four grueling rounds of treatment for his chronic hepatitis C infection over the past 15 years. He is not convinced that his fifth try — with what he jokingly calls "magic medicine" — will be the charm. But he says the three-drug regimen he started on Christmas is definitely easier to take.
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FDA will review safety of testosterone therapy
HealthDay News via U.S News & World Report
Spurred by a recent report that popular testosterone treatments might raise men's heart risk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it now plans a review of the therapies' safety. "FDA is investigating the risk of stroke, heart attack and death in men taking FDA-approved testosterone products," the agency said in a statement released.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


What search for 'Adam's genes' tells us about ourselves
Fox News
FoxNews.com's Jeremy Kaplan reported, that "a pair of scientific studies using the latest genetic evidence are seeking to identify the very first man to walk the Earth, the so-called 'Adam.'" The search for "Adam's genes" tells a compelling story — a story of more than unlocking the genetic code of the first human, but also a story of the human desire to see meaning and purpose in all that we do, whether we consider ourselves religious or not.
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A height gene? One for smarts? Don't bet on it
The Wall Street Journal
Robert Sapolsky writes: As I skimmed my emails one morning — mostly Viagra ads and news of the three lotteries that I had won during the night — one stopped me in my tracks. "Is overeating in your genes? Take an online test." I was curious — not about whether my genes prompted me to pig out, but about how the company's test was supposed to determine that.
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Which parts of us are Neanderthal? Our genes point to skin and hair
NBC News
A double-barreled comparison of ancient Neanderthal DNA with hundreds of modern-day genomes suggests that many of us have Neanderthal skin and hair traits — but other parts of the Neanderthal genome appear to have been bred out of us along the way. The findings, reported by two separate teams of researchers in the journals Science and Nature, follow up on previous studies showing that Neanderthals interbred with humans outside Africa.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Researchers: Excess sugar may double heart disease risk
Bloomberg
High sugar consumption may double the chance of dying from heart disease, according to a study that adds to evidence that high levels of the sweetener in processed foods and drink is bad for a person's health. People whose sugar intake is about a quarter or more of their total daily calories had twice the risk of dying from heart disease than those who whose intake was 7 percent, according to the research today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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The important vitamin you could be lacking
By Lauren Swan
Vitamin D3 is one of those supplements that many people forget they need and therefore rarely take, which can be a devastating combination when it comes to your immune system. Fortunately, this important vitamin can be obtained through sunlight, when in the presence of UVB rays, and in pill form. Vitamin D3 has been proven to boost the strength of a person's immune system and can aid in sleeping habits, as well as energy levels. But what else does vitamin D3 have to offer? Why is it so important to not become deficient, particularly during the winter?
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Attracting young adults to insurance exchanges proves difficult
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After a slow and rocky start, the state and federal health insurance exchanges seem to finally be taking off.

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When good cholesterol goes bad
PBS
The battle of good vs. bad cholesterol might not be so simple anymore.

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Know the health insurance deadline? Most don't
The Atlantic
In a survey out this morning, only 45 percent of Americans correctly identified March 31 as the deadline to purchase health insurance as required under the Affordable Care Act.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


WHO: We can't beat cancer with drugs alone; prevention crucial
Reuters
Governments must make better use of vaccines and preventative public health policies in the fight against cancer as treatment alone cannot stem the disease, a World Health Organization agency said. The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer said cancer was growing "at an alarming pace" worldwide and new strategies were needed to curb the sometimes fatal and often costly disease.
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Cervical cancer: Detectable and preventable
Forbes
Prevention is a cornerstone of public health initiatives. As an example, cervical cancer can be preventable — and if detected early in its course — can be curable. The United States Congress has designated January as Cervical Health Awareness month — and women should be aware that they can take an active part in protecting themselves by knowing the ways to both detect and prevent the spread of this type of cancer.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Howie Mandel: 'We don't take care of our mental health'
CNN
Howie Mandel endured ridicule from other kids as a child because when his shoelaces came undone, he would limp around without tying them. He didn't want to handle the laces because they had touched the ground, and he thought they were dirty. Mandel, a Canadian comedian, later learned that he has obsessive compulsive disorder, a condition characterized by repetitive thoughts, impulses or images, and behaviors performed over and over.
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Fighting against the stigma of mental illness
The Huffington Post
Sarah Fader writes: I have panic disorder. I manage chronic anxiety every single day. I had my first panic attack when I was 15 years old and I had no idea what was going on. I thought I might be having a heart attack. It seemed like a physical problem at first. I had an uncontrollable racing heart followed by sweating and shaking. But then I quickly realized that nervous thoughts were accompanying my physical symptoms.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Clinical performance measures and the locum tenens physician (By Di Hall)
Study: Jet lag, late nights and naps disrupt gene function (Forbes)
Stage 2 meaningful use readiness a growing concern (By Pamela Lewis Dolan)
DNA study: Light skin genes evolved more recently than previously thought (The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


 
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