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We wanted you to be aware that FDA-approved Hysingla™ ER (hydrocodone bitartrate) extended-release tablets CII has commercially launched in the U.S. Please click here to view the press release.

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Otezla® (apremilast) is approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. Please click here for more information.

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Register today: 2015 Spring Managed Care Forum

Register today for the 2015 Spring Forum being held April 23-24, 2015 at Disney's Yacht & Beach Club. Click here to visit the conference website.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


Survey: Patient engagement continues to face challenges
By Scott E. Rupp
In the true age of patient engagement — a topic much talked about the last two years, but one now seemingly having gained real traction — providers continue to admit that they are having trouble with meeting the mandates established for them by meaningful use stage 2 requirements. The challenges they face with engaging patients, of course, means they also run the risk of pushing away patients if they fail to meet consumers on their terms. This is a fairly standard industry sentiment and one of the primary takeaways from a recent nationwide survey.
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Ebola, measles and Chris Christie's inconsistent healthcare beliefs
Forbes
New Jersey Governor and likely presidential candidate Chris Christie is responsible for the current measles outbreak in the United States. Well that is a bit of a stretch — but not by much. The governor just can’t figure out where he stands in balancing the public good against individual rights. When Ebola reached his state last October in the form of Kaci Hickox, a nurse who had treated Ebola patients in West Africa, Christie ordered her held in a plastic tent near Newark with no running water, reliable heat or any other amenities.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


12 simple ways to save money on healthcare
U.S. News & World Report
In the last few years, consumers have found themselves paying a higher percentage of their medical costs. The Affordable Care Act has given more Americans access to health insurance, but many of those plans come with high deductibles — which are also becoming more common in employer-provided plans.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Recommendations for physician-led ACOs
Government Health IT
If you’re a primary care physician, are you a doctor or a CEO? According to a new article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, that question isn’t as off-base as it initially may seem. Penned by, among others, former ONC chief Farzad Mostashari, M.D., the piece suggests readers “consider that a typical primary care physician has approximately 2000 patients, each of whom annually accounts for about $5000 for healthcare spending.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Measure, Monitor Immunoglobulin Treatment Outcomes
BioFeedback for immunoglobulin is a health outcomes reporting program that provides clinical feedback on the use of immunoglobulin in autoimmune-related disorders. Physicians and medical directors can now deploy clinical interventions when they have the greatest impact on healthcare quality and costs.

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ACO task force sets sights on quality, sustainability
FierceHealthPayer
The Health Care Task Force, which is comprised of Aetna, Health Care Services Corporation, Blue Shield of California and BCBS of Massachusetts and several providers, has a difficult goal to acheive: Establishing a standard for value-based care.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves an ADHD drug as the first treatment for binge-eating disorder
The Associated Press via Fox Business
Federal health regulators have approved an attention deficit disorder drug for a new use: A first-of-its kind treatment for binge-eating disorder. The Food and Drug Administration first approved Vyvanse as a once-a-day pill for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in 2007. On Friday the agency cleared the drug for adults who compulsively overeat.
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Bluebird gene therapy wins FDA's 'breakthrough' designation
The Boston Globe
Cambridge startup Bluebird Bio Inc., which is working in the field of gene therapy, said Monday that its experimental treatment for a rare blood disorder has won a “breakthrough therapy” designation from the Food and Drug Administration. The designation was created by the FDA to speed up the development and regulatory review of drug candidates that treat serious or life-threatening diseases when early clinical studies show substantial improvement over existing medicines.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


US to collect genetic data to hone care
The New York Times
Saying that “the possibilities are boundless,” President Barack Obama announced a major biomedical research initiative, including plans to collect genetic data on one million Americans so scientists could develop drugs and treatments tailored to the characteristics of individual patients. Dr. Francis S. Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, said the studies would help doctors decide which treatments would work best for which patients.
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Supercomputing reveals the genetic code of cancer
Medical Xpress
Cancer researchers must use one of the world's fastest computers to detect which versions of genes are only found in cancer cells. Every form of cancer, even every tumor, has its own distinct variants. "This charting may help tailor the treatment to each patient," says Associate Professor Rolf Skotheim, who is affiliated with the Centre for Cancer Biomedicine and the Research Group for Biomedical Informatics at the University of Oslo, as well as the Department of Molecular Oncology at Radiumhospitalet, Oslo University Hospital.
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23andMe: Your genes may be to blame for your motion sickness
SFGate
If you're prone to nausea while riding a car or a roller coaster, your genetics may be responsible, according to a new study from 23andMe. In research published this month, the Mountain View personal genetics testing startup conducted what it said was the first genome-wide association study on motion sickness in almost 80,500 people in its database.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Fitness wearables: To track or not to track
By Natalie Rodriguez
The fitness wearables market has taken off in the past few years, and fitness tech products were all the rage at CES 2015. The wearable technology market will continue to grow, but are consumers jumping on the bandwagon? Over the years, activity trackers have evolved from simple heart rate monitors and pedometers to now tracking mileage, physical activity, calorie intake, heart rate, sleep quality, body temperature, stress level and more. This begs the question: Are fitness wearables a must-have?
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Current flu epidemic highlights need for universal flu vaccine
By Katina Smallwood
This year's influenza season is being considered an epidemic with 46 states reporting widespread flu activity and high number of hospitalizations due to the flu or flu-like viruses. Even those who received this year's vaccine were not sufficiently protected due to its 23 percent effectiveness rate. In order to prevent future flu epidemics, scientists are working on developing a universal flu vaccine that would only need to be received once every 20 years in order to protect against any mutation of the flu virus.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Scientists find new target for most aggressive breast cancer
Medical News Today
A new study has linked deficiency in a gene that controls autophagy — a process that recycles cell waste — with triple-negative breast cancer. The researchers suggest increasing activity of the gene could be an effective way to treat patients with this most aggressive and stubborn cancer.
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Breaking the cycle on cancer
The Huffington Post
As we approach Feb. 4, known to most as World Cancer Day, is more importantly a day that Representative Steve Israel sponsored the resolution for National Cancer Prevention Day. Congressman Israel's effort was a helpful first step in bringing the effort to prevent cancer into the minds of our nation's leadership.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Diet, nutrition closely linked to mental health
Psych Central
It’s extremely important that experts in the fields of psychiatry and public health recognize the undeniable link between mental health and diet and nutrition, say leading academics in a new paper published in the The Lancet Psychiatry. Research has overwhelmingly confirmed the relationship between nutritional deficiencies and poor mental health.
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FAST FACTS
"Heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability in the United States. About 600,000 Americans die of heart disease annually. "


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Millennials are reshaping healthcare (By Scott E. Rupp)
Is Obamacare about controlling our lives? (CNN)
The medical world is changing — How can we keep up? (By Joan Spitrey)
Heartburn 'possible cancer sign' warning (BBC)
Accountable care organizations: Like HMOs, but different (HealthLeaders Media)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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