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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

States meld Medicare and Medicaid
USA Today
They are a diverse group of low-income people who are disabled or elderly. Many have multiple chronic illnesses, or are battling depression or substance abuse. Most will need long-term care at some point in their lives. In the nearly 50 years since Medicaid and Medicare were enacted, the two healthcare programs — one for the poor and the other for the elderly and disabled — have remained separate, with different rules, duplicative benefits and conflicting financial incentives.
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What to consider before deciding to go without health insurance
Los Angeles Times
Sarah Giron wants health insurance, but she says it's just not in her budget. "It's so expensive," says the 34-year-old stay-at-home mom. Her husband, an aerospace worker, gets health insurance at work at a very reasonable rate — just $25 is deducted from his paycheck every other week to cover the cost, she says. But family coverage that includes the Hemet mom and her 2-year-old daughter would cost around $700 a month, she says, and that's just too pricey.
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1/5 of new enrollees under healthcare law fail to pay 1st premium
The New York Times
One in five people who signed up for health insurance under the new healthcare law failed to pay their premiums on time and therefore did not receive coverage in January, insurance companies and industry experts say. Paying the first month's premium is the final step in completing an enrollment. Under federal rules, people must pay the initial premium to have coverage take effect.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

Get CEUs and Safety Training for your Nurses and Case Managers! Group rates available! CareerSmart offers online CEUs and safety training applicable for Nurses, Case Managers and other healthcare professionals. They are designed to help staff prevent work-related injuries and maintain compliance with mandated continuing education requirements.
 


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA: Female sex drive drug needs more research
CNN
A leading drug candidate for low sexual desire in women hasn't gotten approved for use in the United States, but the company backing it isn't giving up. Sprout Pharmaceuticals announced Tuesday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave the company "clear guidance" on "the path forward" for its drug to treat low libido in women, called flibanserin.
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More specialists question safety of testosterone therapy for older men
HealthDay News
Following the recent announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about the potential hazards of using testosterone supplements in older men, another group of experts is raising concerns about the popular treatments. In a statement, specialists in hormonal therapy at the Endocrine Society said the risks and benefits of testosterone supplements for older men with age-related declines in testosterone levels must be investigated more carefully.
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FDA rejects wider use of Xarelto drug
Reuters
U.S. health regulators have again declined to approve proposed wider uses of Bayer AG and Johnson & Johnson's lucrative blood clot preventer Xarelto, the drugmakers said. The companies had sought approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the blockbuster pill for prevention of new heart attacks and strokes, and death, in patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also to prevent clogging of heart stents.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Scientists: Your diet may not fit your genes
Fox News
You are what you eat, and what you eat could be making you age prematurely; in fact, it may even be killing you. And it's not all about 64-ounce cups of sugary soda pop. It may just be that those skinny jeans don't fit your genes. Your diet can trigger genetic effects that cause you to age more rapidly, according to a recently completed study at the University of Southern California Davis.
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Human genes reflect impact of historical events
The Associated Press via ABC News
Tell-tale relics of Europe's colonial period, the Mongol empire and the Arab slave trade can be found in the genes of modern humans, scientists said. Researchers from Britain and Germany used almost 1,500 DNA samples from 95 different populations across the world to produce a map showing genetic links stretching back 4,000 years.
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In search of lost genes
Phys.org
It is well known that genes are passed from one generation to the next. In addition, new genes arise regularly, although the number of genes in a particular organism does not seem to increase. The paradox has been solved by recent research at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, which shows that newly created genes are frequently lost. The spontaneous appearance and disappearance of genes enables organisms to adapt rapidly to their environment and helps drive evolution.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Sleep: The most important part of the day
By Jeff White
We live in a fast-paced society. Everything needs to be done now, and there's always more we have to do. Multitasking is now the norm, and it's even more hectic when kids are added to the mix. Sound familiar? Being able to do it all is good, but to do it all at the expense of getting a full night's sleep or adequate rest can be detrimental to your health. We all know the benefits of exercise and eating healthy, but sleep is just as important to your overall health, and many of our everyday activities can be drastically affected if we don't get enough.
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Extreme loneliness a risk factor for premature death
Fox News
For older adults, extreme loneliness can increase risk of early death by 14 percent, USA Today reported. After reviewing survey responses from more than 2,100 adults aged 55 and older, researchers found that feeling lonely was almost as strong a risk factor for early death as low socioeconomic status. Being poor increased premature death risk by 19 percent.
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Study: Vitamin C linked to reduced stroke risk
Fox News
Eating foods high in vitamin C, such as strawberries, peppers or broccoli, may be linked to a reduced risk for stroke, Medical News Today reported. In a study to be presented later this year at The American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting, researchers analyzed data from 65 patients who had experienced hemorrhagic strokes — comparing them to 65 healthy patients.
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Children exposed to more brain-harming chemicals than ever before
TIME
In recent years, the prevalence of developmental disorders such as autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and dyslexia have soared. While greater awareness and more sophisticated diagnoses are partly responsible for the rise, researchers say the changing environment in which youngsters grow up may also be playing a role.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
States meld Medicare and Medicaid
USA Today
They are a diverse group of low-income people who are disabled or elderly. Many have multiple chronic illnesses, or are battling depression or substance abuse.

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Searching for the best physician in the world
By Clint Hubler
Often as I review physician CVs, I see accomplishments and rankings such as "top doctor in the U.S." or "best doctor in state."

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Millions trapped in health law coverage gap
The Wall Street Journal
Ernest Maiden was dumbfounded to learn that he falls through the cracks of the healthcare law because in a typical week he earns about $200 from the Happiness and Hair Beauty and Barber Salon.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Scientists create 'highway of death' for cancer
CNET
Brain tumors known as Glioblastoma multiform cancer are a particularly insidious form of the disease because they just don't stay still. They travel through the brain by sliding along blood vessels and nerve passageways. This means that sometimes they move to parts of the brain where surgery is extremely difficult — if not impossible — or that even if the bulk of a tumor can be removed, chances are good its tendrils would still exist throughout the brain.
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How fruit flies may be key to the fight against cancer
CBS News
Atlanta businessman Mark Beeninga had long made health and fitness a priority. At age 45 he was preparing to bicycle across the United States. "I was jumping rope for 45 minutes a night, and I was in excellent shape," Beeninga said. And then he went to the doctor for a routine physical.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Virginia bill is first step to improving mental healthcare
By Jessica Taylor
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 33,300 people who suffered from a mental illness died by suicide in the U.S. in 2006. This number increases each year. At the same time, states nationwide have cut $4.5 billion from mental healthcare funding since 2008. But Virginia is taking steps to turn this trend around and become a true leader in the mental healthcare field. The Virginia Senate recently approved Senate Bill 260, which would allow mental health workers more time to find psychiatric beds in crisis situations and would increase the amount of time in an emergency custody.
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Bullying duration linked to lingering health effects
CBS News
Bullying can have a lasting effect on a child's well-being especially if it persists over time, a new study shows. Researchers looked at data on 4,297 kids and adolescents who were enrolled in the fifth through 10th grade. They were asked about their mental and physical health, and whether they had experienced bullying.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FDA reconsiders heart safety of common pain pills (The Associated Press via The Boston Globe)
Ethics questions arise as genetic testing of embryos increases (The New York Times)
Hill plan would reward Medicare doctors for quality (Kaiser Health News)
FDA investigates the safety of testosterone drugs for 'low T' (Healthline)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


 
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