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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 22, 2014

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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Healthcare spending's recent surge stirs unease
The New York Times
It's back. For years, because of structural changes in the healthcare delivery system and the deep economic downturn, the healthcare "cost curve" — as economists and policy makers call it — had bent. Health spending was growing no faster than spending on other goods or services, an anomaly in 50 years of government accounts.
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The price of the ICD-10 delay
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
As the debate took place over whether the transfer to the ICD-10 code set should be delayed or go on as scheduled, one statistic was often repeated: a one-year delay would cost the healthcare system between $1 billion and $6.6 billion. Now that a delay is official — pushing ICD-10 adoption to October 2015 was included in the "doc fix" vote, which also kicked the SGR can down the road for another year — many are left with uncertainty over what this delay means and whether the prediction of a multibillion dollar loss will be realized. So where did the numbers originate and on what are they based?
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Despite optimism, Affordable Care Act has only chipped away at core goal of reducing uninsured
The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report
The federal healthcare overhaul is providing coverage for millions of Americans, but it has only chipped away at one of its core goals: to sharply reduce the number of people without insurance. President Barack Obama announced that 8 million people have signed up for coverage through new insurance exchanges, but many barriers remain.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA lifts its hold on Juno's cutting-edge cancer drug after deaths trigger delay
FierceBiotech
The FDA has lifted a clinical hold placed on a study at Memorial Sloan-Kettering of Juno Therapeutics' cutting-edge approach to treating cancer using genetically tailored T cells. "I confirm that the FDA has rapidly lifted the hold, as expected," wrote MSK's Michel Sadelain in an email to FierceBiotech.
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FDA approves new Type 2 diabetes drug
HealthDay News via WebMD
Millions of Americans with Type 2 diabetes have a new treatment option with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of a once-weekly injectable drug, Tanzeum. The FDA described Tanzeum as a "glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist — a hormone that helps normalize patients' blood sugar levels.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


DNA study: Why Neanderthals, modern humans are so different
Reuters via The Huffington Post
How can creatures as different in body and mind as present-day humans and their extinct Neanderthal cousins be 99.84 percent identical genetically? Four years after scientists discovered that the two species' genomes differ by a fraction of a percent, geneticists said they have an explanation: the cellular equivalent of on/off switches that determine whether DNA is activated or not.
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Identical twins, one case of Down syndrome: A genetic mystery
Los Angeles Times
A rare occurrence in the earliest days of a pregnancy produces an unusual and mystifying outcome: Identical twin fetuses are conceived of the same meeting of egg and sperm. And despite their shared DNA, one of the twins has Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual impairment, but the other does not.
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New research: Chronic pain may be genetic
Medical News Today
Ever wonder why some people seem to have a higher tolerance for pain than others? New research — due to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia — suggests the answer is genetic. The research forms part of an investigation into the causes of chronic pain.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Study: Codeine given to kids despite warning
The Associated Press via CBS News
A new report warns of kids being treated with the powerful painkiller codeine. The American Academy of Pediatrics finds emergency room doctors prescribe codeine to children more than 500,000 times per year. The result comes despite national guidelines that urge against giving the drug to kids.
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'Pollen vortex?' Long winter worsens allergies in spring
LiveScience
This year's long, brutal winter may mean the country's headed for pollen eruption and a harsh allergy season in the spring, doctors say. The freezing temperatures of the prolonged winter may have delayed the blooming of trees, and now that it's finally warming up, trees are expected to bloom at the same time as grasses, causing a dramatic rise in pollen, allergy experts said.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Healthcare spending's recent surge stirs unease
The New York Times
It's back. For years, because of structural changes in the healthcare delivery system and the deep economic downturn, the healthcare "cost curve" — as economists and policy makers call it — had bent.

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read more
In surprise move, CMS announces Medicare Advantage pay increase
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After proposing in February a 1.9 percent cut in reimbursement to insurers in the Medicare Advantage program, Medicare made a surprise announcement and said there would, instead, be a 0.4 percent increase.

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Tax preparers' new role: Health coverage advisers
The New York Times
Iris I. Burnell, an adviser at Jackson Hewitt Tax Service, has prepared scores of returns in the last few months, as she does every year ahead of the April 15 filing deadline.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Is there a link between prostate cancer and chronic inflammation?
Forbes
Based on data from a new study from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, men who demonstrate evidence of chronic inflammation seen in prostate biopsies stemming from chronic prostatitis may have close to twice the risk of developing prostate cancer compared to those without inflammation.
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Invasive bladder cancer may derive from single stem cell type
Medical Daily
New research shows that most cases of bladder cancer may be driven by a single cell type, illuminating a possible therapy target for the disease that kills thousands of Americans each year. Dr. Philip Beachy, a researcher at Stanford University School of Medicine and senior author of the new study, said the results point to a certain stem cell that occurs in the lining of the bladder.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


The future of mental healthcare
The Huffington Post
On April 1, 1944, Mary began keeping a personal diary of her experience as a patient in a tuberculosis hospital, a sanatorium. She was a professional woman in her early 30s, married with a toddler of 15 months. She had been admitted to the hospital, according to the medical standards for care at that time, which called for months to years of rest, relaxation and fresh air — the best therapeutic regimen known then for her illness.
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Study: Language problems common for kids with ADHD
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research. And those language difficulties can have far-reaching academic consequences, the study found. The study, published online April 21 in Pediatrics, looked at 6- to 8-year-olds with and without ADHD in Australia.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Overcoming communication challenges of EHRs (By Jessica Taylor)
Allergy shot or allergy pill? FDA approves new option (Mother Nature Network)
Study: Gene panels may be useful, cheaper alternative to whole-genome sequencing (Medical Xpress)
Procrastination is in your genes (TIME)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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