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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 29, 2014

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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Impressive new smartphone apps in health and medicine
By Rosemary Sparacio
Smartphones are just about everywhere. In the U.S. alone, more than 91 million Americans now use a smartphone. Of course, these devices are much more than just a phone. The fact that there are apps for many areas in personal health and medicine is a logical step to help individuals take better care of themselves and for researchers to find ways for individuals and physicians to do just that. Clearly, the ongoing research, development and availability of health apps is on the forefront of medicine and shows no signs of slowing down.
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Who really pays for healthcare? It might surprise you
USA Today
Eight million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama said this month. Millions more obtained new coverage through the Medicaid program for the poor. Full implementation of the health law and its wider coverage, new taxes and shifting subsidies have renewed discussions of winners and losers, makers and moochers.
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New research showing promise in contraceptives for women
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Many contraceptive methods are available in the market. However, they are associated with the risk of side effects and with chances of drug failure. The cost of the contraceptives is also important, but many of the new contraceptives are not affordable for millions of women. There is an urgent need to develop effective and affordable contraceptives for women with different needs and different age groups. Here is a look at some of the different methods, along with new research being developed.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA warns against bogus autism treatments
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Companies that make false or misleading claims that their products and therapies can treat or even cure autism face possible legal action if they continue, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned them. As part of National Autism Awareness Month in April, the FDA wanted to inform consumers about bogus autism therapies.
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FDA warning on pain injections comes too late for some
Bloomberg Businessweek
One of the most popular treatments for neck and back pain — steroid shots — can be dangerous, and in rare cases can cause paralysis and death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned. The FDA is late to the game when it comes to concern about the safety of the shots when they're injected into the epidural space of the spine.
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FDA approves 1st targeted drug for advanced stomach cancer
Health Canal
Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Controlling fear by modifying DNA
Medical Xpress
For many people, fear of flying or of spiders skittering across the lounge room floor is more than just a momentary increase in heart rate and a pair of sweaty palms. It's a hard-core phobia that can lead to crippling anxiety, but an international team of researchers, including neuroscientists from The University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute, may have found a way to silence the gene that feeds this fear.
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Nature and nurture: Baby's development is affected by genes and conditions in the womb
Medical Xpress
A recent study led by A*STAR's Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences found that genetics as well as the environment in the womb play important roles in the development of the baby. The effort by the international team of scientists and clinicians is the world's first attempt to discover how genetic and environmental factors affect the human epigenome.
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Y chromosome discovery strikes men off the endangered species list
Forbes
Feminists and biologists alike have been predicting the end of men for decades. But it appears the hairier sex may have a little while longer left on this planet if a new piece of genetic research is anything to go by. Supporters of the so-called "rotting Y" theory believe that men's days are numbered due to the Y chromosome, which has shed hundreds of genes during the last 300 million years of evolution.
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Can you turn off your fat genes?
Prevention via Fox News
You can't change your genes, but you just might be able to change how they work in your body. And in the case of those that play a role in fat loss, pumping iron could be key. In addition to affecting the genes in your muscles, resistance training also influences the genes in your fat, says a new study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Random online match helps man lose nearly 400 pounds
CNN
Inspiration can come from unlikely places. Brian Flemming found the will to change his life in a drawing game. Flemming was addicted to alcohol, severely morbidly obese and full of self-pity when he met Jackie Eastham through a random match on Draw Something, the Pictionary-like mobile game. It was the spring of 2012. Most nights Flemming drank around a fifth vodka mixed with a liter of soda while he zoned out in front of the TV.
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Laughter may be the best medicine for age-related memory loss
Medical News Today
We are all familiar with the saying, "laughter is the best medicine." And this motto may ring true when it comes to tackling age-related memory loss; a new study from Loma Linda University in California finds that humor may reduce brain damage caused by the "stress hormone" cortisol, which in turn, improves memory.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Impressive new smartphone apps in health and medicine
By Rosemary Sparacio
Smartphones are just about everywhere. In the U.S. alone, more than 91 million Americans now use a smartphone. Of course, these devices are much more than just a phone.

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The price of the ICD-10 delay
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
As the debate took place over whether the transfer to the ICD-10 code set should be delayed or go on as scheduled, one statistic was often repeated: a one-year delay would cost the healthcare system between $1 billion and $6.6 billion.

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Healthcare spending's recent surge stirs unease
The New York Times
It's back. For years, because of structural changes in the healthcare delivery system and the deep economic downturn, the healthcare "cost curve" — as economists and policy makers call it — had bent.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Breast cancer's costly side-effect: Long-term unemployment
NBC News
Women who get chemotherapy for breast cancer may end up unemployed for a very long time, researchers reported. A few may lose their jobs because they cannot work consistently — although it's usually illegal to fire someone for being ill. But many may underestimate just how much chemotherapy can take out of you, doctors said.
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Sisters' cancer survival continues to inspire
USA Today
Angel, Kathleen and Brenda O'Brien posed for professional photographs last month. The blonde sisters donned golden headbands and sheer white dresses, gently draped over different body types, scars and silicon that tell the story of each of their battles with breast cancer, the same disease their mother fought decades before.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


This is you on stress
Health.com
Even if your head doesn't spin with these exact worries when it hits the pillow at night, there's probably something similar whirring through your brain, keeping you up just when you should be powering down. As a psychiatrist and contributor to the Today show, Gail Saltz, M.D., sees many women who battle with anxieties, and not just at night.
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Is it time to treat mental health like a regular checkup?
KCNC-TV
As our country comes to grip with yet another tragic incident of a violent murder inside of a high school, this time from a stabbing in Connecticut, and at a time when our own community prepares to have another very high profile trial weighing the sanity of a killer, is it time to look at mental health differently?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Despite optimism, Affordable Care Act has only chipped away at core goal of reducing uninsured (The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report)
Identical twins, one case of Down syndrome: A genetic mystery (Los Angeles Times)
The future of mental healthcare (The Huffington Post)
DNA study: Why Neanderthals, modern humans are so different (Reuters via The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


 
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