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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May 20, 2014

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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Banning the handshake from the healthcare setting
JAMA
The handshake represents a deeply established social custom. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of hands as vectors for infection, leading to formal recommendations and policies regarding hand hygiene in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. In an attempt to avoid contracting or spreading infection, many individuals have made their own efforts to avoid shaking hands in various settings but, in doing so, may face social, political and even financial risks. Regulations to restrict the handshake from the healthcare setting, in conjunction with more robust hand hygiene programs, may help limit the spread of disease and thus could potentially decrease the clinical and economic burden associated with hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial resistance.
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UnitedHealth leads plan to reveal health prices to consumers
Bloomberg
UnitedHealth Group Inc., the largest U.S. health insurer, will lead an industry effort to throw a spotlight on the prices paid for healthcare services, making their costs available to consumers on the Internet. The effort, organized by a nonprofit called the Health Care Cost Institute, builds on steps the Obama administration has taken to shed light on prices charged by healthcare providers.
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US mines personal health records to find the vulnerable in emergencies
The New York Times
When a rare ice storm threatened New Orleans in January, some residents heard from a city official who had gained access to their private medical information. Kidney dialysis patients were advised to seek early treatment because clinics would be closing. Others who rely on breathing machines at home were told how to find help if the power went out. For the first time, federal officials scoured Medicare health insurance claims to identify potentially vulnerable people and share their names with local public health authorities for outreach during emergencies and disaster drills.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Radical treatment pushes patients to the brink of death in order to save them
Smithsonian
In an effort to save lives, surgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center will soon attempt a radical scenario for a select few critically injured patients: cooling their bodies down until there are no signs of brain activity nor pulse. The technique gives surgeons more time to repair otherwise fatal injuries before returning the patients' bodies to a normal temperature — bringing them, so to speak, "back to life."
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FDA proposes expedited access program for medical devices
Lexology
The FDA has announced a proposed new program to provide earlier access to high-risk medical devices that are intended to treat or diagnose patients with serious conditions whose medical needs are unmet by current technology.
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Device reduces progression of persistent AF by 58 percent
Today's Medical Developments
New data presented as a late-breaking clinical trial during the Heart Rhythm Society's 2014 Annual Scientific Sessions show that an advanced pacing feature exclusive to Medtronic Inc. pacemakers significantly delays the progression of persistent atrial fibrillation in patients with bradycardia.
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New tech could take cancer treatment deep inside the body
Product Design & Development
Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for easily accessible tumors such as oral and skin cancer. But the procedure, which uses lasers to activate special drugs called photosensitizing agents, isn't adept at fighting cancer deep inside the body. Thankfully, that's changing due to new technology that could bring PDT into areas of the body that were previously inaccessible.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Biotech's brave new world: Push 1 to create life; push 2 to create alien life
Forbes
A few decades back, while he was working to read the human genome (i.e. the Human Genome Project), biologist Craig Venter also began wondering what it would take to write one. Back then, DNA synthesis technology was too crude and expensive to consider writing a minimum genome for life, but exponential advances in biotechnology have now obliterated these problems.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "DNA synthesis."


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Gene expression profiling weighs heavily in decisions for breast cancer patients yet poorly understood
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Gene expression profiling tests play a critical role when women with early-stage breast cancer decide whether to receive chemotherapy. However, many of the patients do not fully understand what some of the test results mean, new research has suggested.
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Chemists design molecules for controlling bacterial behavior
Nanowerk
Chemists from Syracuse University have figured out how to control multiple bacterial behaviors — potentially good news for the treatment of infectious diseases and other bacteria-associated issues — without causing drug resistance.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


How worried should travelers be about MERS?
The Boston Globe
Travelers heading through U.S. airports are now seeing signs on the security line warning them about Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked airports to alert travelers to certain countries on the Arabian Peninsula to take precautions such as washing their hands often, avoiding touching their face, and avoiding close contact with sick people.
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Study: 2 large meals better than 6 small ones to control weight, blood sugar
Diabetologia via Science Codex
Research published in Diabetologia suggests that two large meals (breakfast and lunch), rather than six small meals with the same total calories, are better for controlling weight and blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes.
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'Free' visit? Preventive services have patients confused, doctors frustrated
The Cincinnati Enquirer
Access to free preventive health care services has been touted as a cornerstone of the nation's health reform law. But certain services that some patients believe qualify as preventive are surprising them with unexpected, costly bills.
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CDC endorses HIV prevention pill
Vox
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced its support for preexposure prophylaxis, a once-a-day antiviral pill that helps prevent HIV. The pill, manufactured by Gilead Sciences, is more popularly known as Truvada on the market.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Banning the handshake from healthcare settings
JAMA
The handshake represents a deeply established social custom. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of hands as vectors for infection.

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The health insurance trap
Forbes
Researchers at Harvard and Dartmouth predict that healthcare costs will continue to grow faster than the economy for at least the next two decades. This is a tremendous burden on average Americans.

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Does health insurance increase your lifespan?
USA Today
The Massachusetts mortality rate declined substantially in the four years after the state mandated universal healthcare coverage, providing the model for the Affordable Care Act.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Developing a multidisciplinary geriatric oncology center
OncLive
Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University's Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a model for establishing a comprehensive multidisciplinary geriatric oncology center to help combat the over- or under-treatment that elderly oncology patients often face. It's an important aspect of delivering cancer care, especially because the U.S. population over the age of 65 is expected to double in size by 2030, and the cancer incidence is 11 times higher in this age group.
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Oncology community scrutinizing obstacles to personalized medicine
Oncology Practice Digital Network via The Oncology Report
Personalized medicine is a reality for many cancer patients, and getting closer for others, but the oncology community is struggling with a number of questions surrounding genomic testing, a key to providing that care. As a result, oncology leaders have started to take a closer look at how to resolve these issues, and how to do it as quickly as possible.
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Kaiser EHR analysis shows radiation trumps chemo for rare skin cancer
Health Data Management
A Kaiser Permanente analysis of electronic health record data has revealed that patients with a rare type of skin cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma, have a 70 percent lower risk of disease recurrence if they are treated with radiation, while chemotherapy did not appear to have any impact on recurrence or survival.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Smartphone app monitors mood swings for bipolar disorder
Behavioral Healthcare
University of Michigan researchers have created a smartphone app that monitors subtle qualities of a person's voice during everyday phone conversations, showing promise for detecting early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorder.
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Study identifies genetic biomarker that may contribute to development of OCD
Psychiatric News Alert
In a study published in the current Molecular Psychiatry, researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine provide some insight into factors that may underlie obsessive-compulsive disorder, which affects about 2 percent of the U.S. population, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.
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Peer recovery support for substance abuse: Assessing the evidence
Psychiatric Services in Advance
Peer recovery support providers aim to help individual achieve and maintain recovery, yet studies to date have not tested the key mechanisms of this intervention. Does existing evidence support this treatment technique?
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FAST FACTS
"A protein called Kindlin-3 drives breast cancer cells to migrate throughout the body. Inhibiting Kindlin-3 functions with new drugs could prevent the spread of breast cancer, according to the Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is overprescribing really to blame for antibiotic resistance? (Lauren Swan)
Scientists ID 'high-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer (Medical News Today)
The genes responsible for deadly prostate cancer discovered (Time)
Singular gene could increase brain power and fight off dementia (The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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