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SAVE THE DATE
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Health plans in the new healthcare exchanges
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
If you've been keeping up with the healthcare debate, you'll notice Republicans are predicting the demise of "Obamacare" and Democrats are predicting the Affordable Care Act to be the "second coming." The debate is coming to a fever pitch again because the new healthcare exchanges are about to come to fruition. Starting Oct. 1, consumers will be able to go online and view these different plans. Now that the date is nearing, some state exchanges have released their plan options and their associated premiums from participating insurance companies on the exchange.
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CDC: 1 in 5 Americans report at least 1 ER visit last year
American College of Emergency Physicians via The Herald
One in five Americans reported visiting an emergency department at least once in the past year, according to new report on America's health from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's. The findings show America's increasing reliance on emergency care, according to Dr. Andy Sama, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
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The price and the pricelessness of healthcare
Forbes
The New York Times published its latest salvo on the outrageousness of healthcare prices. Elizabeth Rosenthal described how U.S. prices compare unfavorably with other countries. A hip replacement that costs on average $40,364 in the U.S. costs $7,731 in Spain. Switzerland charges $655 for a colonoscopy, compared with $1,185 in the U.S. — more than the cost of childbirth or an appendectomy in most other countries.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA can't hold back stream of mobile health apps
Wired
It was bound to happen. As smartphones, tablets and all those wearable computer gizmos get more and more powerful — and just as important — become ever more constant in our lives, they will enable apps that no one anticipated. Not even the people of the Food and Drug Administration.
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Dispute flares within FDA over safety of popular blood pressure drugs
The Wall Street Journal via Fox News
The top-selling class of blood-pressure drugs is under attack from an unusual source: A senior regulator at the Food and Drug Administration. Bucking his bosses, Thomas A. Marciniak is seeking stronger warnings about the drugs known as angiotensin receptor blockers, or ARBs, according to internal documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Study: Staying fit cuts cancer death risk in middle age
Bloomberg via Delmarva Now
Middle-aged men who stayed fit were less likely to die from three common cancers after being diagnosed than those who were out of shape, research found. In a study of 17,049 men, those with good respiratory and cardiovascular fitness were more likely to survive prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, and avoid developing lung or colorectal cancers.
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Newly discovered virus takes more lives, spreads
CNN
A new SARS-like virus recently found in humans continues to spread — with the worldwide total now at 49, the World Health Organization said. Of the 49 known infections with the MERS-CoV virus, 27 have resulted in death, the organization said.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Incentives push doctors to electronic medical records (USA Today)
Azithromycin may reduce COPD flare-ups (MedPage Today)
Scientists make breast cancer advance that turns previous thinking on its head (Medical News Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Drug shows promise against advanced melanoma
HealthDay News via WebMD
Nearly one-third of patients with advanced melanomas who received nivolumab, a new immune-based drug, experienced reductions in the size of their tumors, a preliminary study reveals. Since these types of drugs have typically shrunk tumors in only 5 percent to 10 percent of patients in prior studies, the new results are a boost for immunotherapy generally, the researchers noted.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Gene therapy may protect against flu pandemics
HealthDay News via WebMD
Gene therapy that turns cells in the nose into factories that crank out super antibodies against the flu protected mice and ferrets against lethal doses of several pandemic strains of the virus. If the approach works in humans, it could offer several important advantages over flu vaccines, said study author Dr. James Wilson, a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
FDA can't hold back stream of mobile health apps
Wired
It was bound to happen. As smartphones, tablets and all those wearable computer gizmos get more and more powerful — and just as important — become ever more constant in our lives, they will enable apps that no one anticipated. Not even the people of the Food and Drug Administration.

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Disability and discrimination at the doctor's office
The New York Times
It's been nearly 23 years since the Americans With Disabilities Act, a federal law prohibiting discrimination against people with disabilities, went into effect. Despite its unequivocal language, studies in recent years have revealed that disabled patients tend not only to be in poorer health, but also to receive inadequate preventive care and to experience worse outcomes.

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Who has the answers to reducing healthcare costs?
By Mike Wokasch
Not the government, not insurance companies, not hospital administrators. Nope. Frontline healthcare providers have more practical answers to reducing the cost of healthcare than any executive, agency, committee or consulting firm.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Vinegar test may reduce cervical cancer deaths
MedPage Today
Vinegar has been used for everything from cleaning refrigerators to taming foot odors, and now this common kitchen staple may reduce cervical cancer deaths as well, researchers reported here. In a 12-year randomized study of 150,000 women in India, biennial visual inspection with vinegar reduced cervical cancer mortality by 31 percent, compared with no screening.
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New weapon in fight against cervical cancer
ScienceDaily
Scientists at the University of Leeds have found a way to target and destroy a key protein associated with the development of cervical and other cancers. The E7 protein is produced early in the lifecycle of the human papillomavirus and blocks the body's natural defences against the uncontrolled division of cells that can lead to cancer. Researchers at the University of Leeds' School of Molecular and Cellular Biology have synthesized a molecule, called an RNA aptamer, that latches onto the carcinogenic protein and targets it for destruction, significantly reducing its presence in cells in the laboratory derived from cervical cancers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Hundreds of studies back benefits of psychotherapy for depression
Public Library of Science via Psych Central
Treatments for depression that do not involve antidepressant drugs but rather focus on different forms of psychotherapy interventions are all beneficial. The techniques, also sometimes called talk therapy, can take various iterations with no one form of therapy being better than the others, according to a study by international researchers published in PLOS Medicine.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


When work stress yields depression, it's unbearable
Forbes
Depression is a bear of a burden on its own, let alone in the workplace where the stigma attached to it is arguably just as bad as the consequences of remaining silent for the employee and the employer. That's the message from the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health which joined with Employers Health launching Right Direction to educate employers and employees about depression, reduce stigma and increase the chances of people asking for help.
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Adolescent smoking may increase adult anxiety
GoodTherapy.org
Smoking is a global problem and has long been associated with negative mental health. People with psychological problems are much more likely to smoke than those without. Few studies, however, have looked at how adolescent smoking impacts vulnerability to mental health problems. Because rates of smoking are extremely high among people with anxiety, Steven Moylan of the School of Medicine at Deakin University in Australia chose to study anxiety and smoking in a large sample of adolescents.
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Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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