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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
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Short-term health insurance attracts many despite drawbacks
The New York Times
Temporary, bare-bones insurance plans that don’t meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act are still attracting consumers, online insurance brokers report. But health experts caution consumers to be wary of the plans. Ehealth, a publicly traded online health insurance broker, said that the number of applicants for the short-term plans on its website more than doubled in 2014, to 140,000 people.
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Major inflection point looms for US healthcare costs
CNBC
What do two divergent inflation readings have to do with a blockbuster healthcare deal? Quite a lot, actually. For starters, there is the potential $32 billion-plus deal for health insurance giant Humana, the bulk of whose earnings come from Medicare, the federal program that insures America's elderly. Then, there is the gap between the two leading U.S. core inflation readings, which recently hit a six-year high.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Obama confident supreme court will uphold health insurance subsidies
The Wall Street Journal
President Barack Obama expressed confidence that the Supreme Court would uphold subsidies millions of consumers use to buy health insurance, and at the same time warned of possible dire consequences if that doesn’t happen. Speaking at a news conference in Krun, Germany, at the Group of Seven summit, Obama said, the case, which the Supreme Court is expected to decide near the end of the month “should be an easy case. Frankly, it probably shouldn’t even have been taken up.”
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


CMS' final ACO rule alters some proposed health IT provisions
iHealthBeat
CMS issued a final rule for its Medicare Shared Savings Program that includes some changes to health IT provisions outlined in a proposed rule, Health Data Management reports. The health IT provisions are part of changes to MSSP that are designed to lower the initial risk of creating an accountable care organization and increase participation in the program.
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Bundled payments may be more cost effective than ACOs
FierceHealthFinance
A new report on the Medicare program's attempt to remake the nation's healthcare finance system praised accountable care organizations but also pushed for the continued use of bundled payments to facilitate lower-cost, higher-quality care. In the report, the Center for American Progress asked the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to continue to expand the Medicare Acute Care Episode demonstration program and participate more in the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Viagra for women backed by FDA advisory committee
KMOX-TV
It’s being called the “little pink pill” — a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee has voted to recommend that the FDA approve Viagra for women. The medical field says the pill differs from Viagra because for men, Viagra works on a clinical level, whereas for women who lose interest in sex, it’s mental.
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FDA: Amgen's Repatha effective; question is for which patients
Reuters
Amgen Inc.'s experimental drug Repatha lowered cholesterol in clinical trials and did not cause a marked disparity in deaths or serious adverse events but showed potential safety issues that should be explored, according to a preliminary review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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FDA approves mid-stage trial of vaccine to reverse Type 1 diabetes
Reuters via Fox News
Diabetes researchers are hoping that an almost century-old vaccine for preventing tuberculosis may also reverse Type 1 diabetes. The FDA has approved a mid-stage trial to test the vaccine, called bacillus Calmette-Guerin, in 150 adults with advanced cases of the disease. The approval was announced at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association by Dr. Denise Faustman, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory in Boston and principal investigator of the study.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Do creativity and schizophrenia share a small genetic link? Maybe
NPR
The genetic underpinnings of psychosis are elusive and diffuse. There are hundreds of common genetic mutations scattered throughout the human genome that each bump up by just a tiny bit the risk of developing a mental illness like schizophrenia. Many people carry some set of those genes, but most don't end up with a psychotic disorder. Instead, a study suggests, they might be getting a small creative boost.
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Explaining 'epigenetics': The health buzzword you need to know
TIME
Most of us get an introduction — whether we remember it or not — to genetics in our first biology class. We learn that genes, made up of DNA, are the molecular blueprint that make us who we are, and that this DNA code is a unique combination of instructions from both our mothers and fathers.
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Genes do influence when you have your firstborn
Inquisitr
Women may be ignoring their biological clocks and delaying childbirth, but genes may still have some say in the matter, indicate a couple of studies that concluded recently. There’s an interesting contradiction being observed in the modern society. It appears human females are actually evolving to become fertile younger and younger. In other words, girls are now biologically ready to bear children at a much younger age. Needless to say, this makes them more susceptible to teenage pregnancy.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Violence from weapons affects 1 in 4 kids
Medpage Today
More than one-quarter of all children nationwide have been exposed to violence involving a weapon, according to the results of a telephone-based survey. Over 17.5 million children ages 2 to 17 have either been victimized by weapons, such as a knife, gun, stick, or rock, or witnessed victimization with a weapon, reported Kimberly J. Mitchell, Ph.D., of the University of New Hampshire, and colleagues.
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Health benefits of eating placenta 'unproven'
Medical News Today
The study, published in Archives of Women's Mental Health involved a review of 10 published research studies on placentophagy — the practice of consuming placentas after childbirth. Four of these were human studies and six were animal studies deemed relevant to human practice. During pregnancy, the placenta develops within the uterus to provide oxygen and nutrients for the baby and to remove waste products from its blood.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Why some states face higher cancer risk
CBS News
The war on cancer continues, and as some battles are won in research, others may be lost in quality of life that varies state by state. Overall, the number of people surviving cancer is rising. But people in some parts of the country have higher risk than others, according to new data from the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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DNA test detects cancer during pregnancy
U.S. News & World Report
The same test that screens for chromosomal disorders like Down syndrome may also identify early stage cancers in expectant mothers. The study, published in JAMA Oncology, examined the accuracy of noninvasive prenatal testing among more than 4,000 moms to be. Noninvasive prenatal testing, which involves a blood test done as early as 10 weeks, is gaining popularity as a genetic test for pregnant women.
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Breast cancer spread 'trigger' discovered
The Guardian
New therapies to stop the progression of breast cancer could emerge from a fresh study into the disease, researchers believe. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh said they have discovered a “trigger” that allows breast cancer cells to spread to the lungs. They found that blocking those signals in mice with breast cancer greatly reduces the number of secondary tumors found in the lungs.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Does summer make you depressed?
CNN
Here's a brief reminder not to assume everyone experiences the world the same way you do: Though you may be pumped for the sunshine-y days of summer ahead, there's a small minority for whom summer is depressing. Seasonal affective disorder, something we typically associate with winter, happens to some people in the summer.
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Respite centers offer a way to avoid mental health crisis and the hospital
The Washington Post
It is a busy Friday afternoon. Staff members check in guests at the front desk. Other employees lead visitors on tours of the upstairs bedrooms and field calls from people considering future stays. Aromas of garlic and roasted chicken seep out of the kitchen.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Interest in Medicare ACOs could hinge on rule expected soon (Modern Healthcare)
Experts see big price hikes for Obamacare (POLITICO)
Obamacare's 'accountable care' experiment is all hype, no substance (Forbes)
Think you've got good health insurance? Think again (New York Observer)
What's going on with spending on health insurance overhead? (The Wall Street Journal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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