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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


Bigger may be better for health insurers, but doubts remain for consumers
The New York Times
Deals among the nation’s largest health insurers in recent weeks have been almost head-spinning. But whatever the details, if the combinations are finalized, the result will be an industry dominated by three colossal insurers. Consumer advocates, policy experts and former regulators say that what may be good for the insurers may not be good for consumers, especially in the wake of a similar frenzy of deal-making among hospitals and doctors’ groups.
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Obamacare exchange customers: Healthcare still costs too much
U.S. News & World Report
Many Americans who bought health insurance through exchanges operated by states or the federal government have a good understanding of how their plan works, but also are afraid they can't afford medical services, according to research published by the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. Health insurance exchanges, or "marketplaces," were created as part of President Barack Obama's healthcare law, the Affordable Care Act.
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The connection between health coverage and income security
The Wall Street Journal
Discussions of expanding health coverage and improving economic security for working Americans don’t overlap much — but they are connected. As the chart above shows, when lower- and moderate-income people gain health coverage, the burden of paying healthcare bills is eased and they are able to focus on other pocketbook issues.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


GIS mashups can help ACOs, HIEs
Health Data Management
Pioneering public health departments across the country are exploring using non-clinical datasets such as census data to better plan their services, but a group of researchers at Indiana University and the Regenstrief Institute also believe combining such data with clinical data could be valuable for health delivery systems and accountable care organizations, as well as supply a value-add service for health information exchanges.
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ACOs appear unable to incentivize physicians to limit costs
Medscape
Practices in affordable care organizations provide a slightly higher compensation for quality when compared with practices at large. Both ACO and non-ACO practices are similar, however, in regard to compensation based on productivity and salary. This suggests that the incentives for ACOs may not be strong enough to encourage practices to change physician compensation policies.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA says investigating latest cyclosporiasis outbreak
Reuters via Fox News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it is investigating the latest outbreak of cyclosporiasis in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been notified of about 358 confirmed cases of the infection, the FDA said in a statement on its website.
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FDA clears 1st 3-D printed prescription drug
The Associated Press via ABC News
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first prescription drug made through 3-D printing: a dissolvable tablet that treats seizures. Aprecia Pharmaceuticals said Monday the FDA approved its drug Spritam for adults and children who suffer from certain types of seizures caused by epilepsy. The tablet is manufactured in a layered process via 3-D printing and dissolves when taken with liquid.
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FDA approves new rosacea treatment
HealthDay News via WebMD
A new prescription treatment for the common skin condition rosacea was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Rosacea is a chronic disease that causes redness and pimples on the skin. In most cases, it affects only the face. Rosacea is most common in women and people with fair complexions, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Scientists resurrect millennia-old viruses for use in gene therapy
Newsweek
Scientists have successfully reconstructed a virus thousands of years after it became extinct, a development they believe could herald a new step in treating genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. By creating an evolutionary history of adeno-associated viruses, which infect humans and primates but do not cause disease, researchers from Harvard Medical School were able to construct Anc80, an ancestral virus which they believe to be between 2,000 and 200,000 years old.
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Expanding the brain: Research identifies more than 40 new imprinted genes
Medical Xpress
It's among the cornerstones of biology: All mammals inherit two copies ― one from their mother, the other from their father — of every gene, in part to act as a backstop against genetic problems. If a gene is damaged or malfunctions, its double can pick up the slack. When it comes to inheritance, however, not all genes are created equal.
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Bully or bystander? It could be in the genes
Smithsonian
Often, the traditional image of the schoolyard bully is of a troubled child lashing out at others because they don’t know how else to handle their emotions. But a controversial new study challenges the idea that bullying is behavior that can be learned or unlearned: In fact, it may have roots in the bully’s genes.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


The connection between lifestyle and biomarkers of Alzheimer's
By Denise A. Valenti
A recent study took a close look at the relationship between lifestyle behaviors and the biomarkers used to determine a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers found that despite having a history of lifelong cognitive stimulation and activity, the biomarkers of disease were still evident. While the volume of the actual brain deposits may not be modified by a more physical lifestyle, new evidence suggests physical activity may slow the functional decline these deposits cause.
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Science explains why women are always freezing at work
FORTUNE
Turns out workplace thermostats are kinda sexist. Women who are always freezing at work finally know who to blame: Men. In a new report published in Nature, researchers found that most office building temperatures are set using a decades-old formula for a “thermal comfort model” that takes into account factors like air temperature, air speed, and clothing insulation.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Yo-yo dieting not associated with increased cancer risk
Medical Xpress
The first comprehensive study of its kind finds weight cycling, repeated cycles of intentional weight loss followed by regain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer in men or women. The study by American Cancer Society investigators is the largest to date to investigate weight cycling with cancer risk. It appears early online in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
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Urine test could detect early pancreatic cancer
HealthDay News via CBS News
Scientists report that they have developed a urine test that may detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage. Usually, symptoms of this deadly disease do not appear until it is at an advanced stage and has spread, and little can be done to save the patient. Researchers have been looking for a way to screen people for pancreatic cancer in the hopes that early detection might lead to effective treatment.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Study: Poverty harms brain development in children
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Between 2009 and 2010, 1 million more children in America joined the ranks of those living in poverty, bringing the total to an estimated 15.7 million poor children. Poverty can impede a child's ability to learn and contribute to social, emotional and behavioral problems, as well as poor health and mental health. In fact, new research shows poverty appears to affect the brain development of children, hampering the growth of gray matter and impairing their academic performance.
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What picky eating might mean for children later
The Wall Street Journal
Children’s picky eating may not be as harmless as is commonly believed. A new study found that moderate and severe cases of selective eating were associated with elevated symptoms of anxiety and depression in later years. Moderate cases also were associated with symptoms of separation anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. The study, published online in the journal Pediatrics, followed more than 900 children between the ages of 2 years and up to 6 for an average of three years.
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Evaluating the use of psychotropic medications for mental illness
By Dr. Abimbola Farinde
Before the advent of psychopharmacology, many people suffered from the symptoms of their mental disorders, which significantly impaired their overall functioning. But this branch of pharmacology provides these individuals with hope and the possibility of a normal life, despite the presence of their illness. The study of psychopharmacology has led to the discovery of numerous drugs that have improved people's quality of life and provided them with hope.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The gene for sweet: Why we don't all taste sugar the same way (NPR)
Semen has controlling power over female genes and behavior (New Scientist)
Just one 'all-nighter' can alter your genes (Popular Science)
Study identifies 'major player' in skin cancer genes (Medical Xpress)
The human brain and neurogenesis: Healthy neural stem cells and progenitor cells may help reverse brain damage (Medical Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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