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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

The coming liberation: Healthcare for all without Obamacare
Forbes
Obamacare was pushed through on the promise of universal health coverage for everyone. But the CBO now scores Obamacare as leaving 30 million uninsured even 10 years after implementation. In fact, Obamacare will increase the uninsured rather than reduce them. Former CBO Chief Douglas Holtz-Eakin published a study in 2011 arguing that more than 40 million workers will lose their employer provided health insurance under the incentives of Obamacare.
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Obamacare tougher to launch than Medicare
POLITICO
President Barack Obama says he's not worried that all the Obamacare fights will kill the law — because people fought the creation of Medicare and Social Security too, and now they're more popular than ever. Democrats have always wanted to believe Obamacare would follow the same pattern: Opponents tried to block passage of the new programs, but once they became law, the public saw the benefits and the opposition faded away.
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Is your healthcare considered preventive?
Los Angeles Times
When David Brutman received a $3,000 bill for his wife's colonoscopy, he was angry and confused. He thought the cost would all be covered because under the Affordable Care Act most insurers must cover the full cost of preventive care such as check-ups, vaccinations and screenings. It seemed straightforward enough, yet Brutman, a 41-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur, learned the hard way that the lines are easily blurred when it comes to determining whether services are considered preventive care or treatments that require payment.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA may fast track drugs to fight HIV
Bloomberg via The Boston Globe
Harold Fuller has run out of options to keep his HIV at bay. Fuller, 56, of Brooklyn, has lived with the virus for 20 years. Earlier in his illness, he stayed ahead of HIV's ability to mutate by changing medicines every two years. For the past five years, though, Fuller has had to take the same pills because of a lack of new treatments. "I've been on medication since 1995, and after a while everything stops working," Fuller said. His doctor, he said, "has no clue what to do."
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


FDA issues guidelines on wireless medical devices
InformationWeek
The Food and Drug Administration has released final guidelines on the design, testing and use of radio-frequency wireless medical devices. Although it doesn't promulgate legally enforceable responsibilities, the document is intended to guide both device manufacturers and healthcare providers toward the safe and secure use of wireless medical devices. Covered are devices "that are implanted, worn on the body or other external wireless medical devices intended for use in hospitals, homes, clinics, clinical laboratories and blood establishments."
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Research: Moderate exercise could be good for your tendons
ScienceDaily
Moderate exercise could be good for keeping your tendons healthy according to new research from the University of East Anglia funded by Arthritis Research U.K. The onset of tendon disease has previously been associated with exercise. However new research published n the journal Molecular Cell Research shows that doing moderate exercise could help guard against and treat the painful and often debilitating condition.
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Caffeinated drinks may be good for the liver
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered that an increased caffeine intake may reduce the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, according to a study published in the journal Hepatology. A team from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School and the Duke University School of Medicine used cell culture and mice as models for the effects of caffeine on the liver disease.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Researchers find new epilepsy genes, hope treatments will follow
CBS News
Epilepsy researchers are reporting they have found up to 25 new genetic mutations that may be behind some of the most debilitating forms of the condition. By identifying these new mutations they found on nine key genes associated with the disorder, the researchers hope they can develop new treatments that precisely target the mutations.
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Scientists find way to predict and control gene expression
Medical Xpress
EPFL scientists have developed a "guide" that can be used to precisely predict the number of proteins a given gene will produce under varying conditions. This work will help biologists to engineer cells. Genes are segments of DNA within our cells that oversee how our bodies take shape. They receive orders to produce specific proteins; these proteins become the building blocks of everything in our body, from organs to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. Our genes are thus at the very center of who we are.
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Genes discovered to explain high altitude disease
Medical News Todayd
Scientists say they have discovered why some humans develop chronic mountain sickness while other people can adapt to high altitudes. According to a study published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, it is all in the genes. Researchers from the University of California-San Diego say they have decoded a genetic basis for chronic mountain sickness, also known as Monge's disease, which could potentially lead to the development of new treatments.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
The coming liberation: Healthcare for all without Obamacare
Forbes
Obamacare was pushed through on the promise of universal health coverage for everyone. But the CBO now scores Obamacare as leaving 30 million uninsured even 10 years after implementation. In fact, Obamacare will increase the uninsured rather than reduce them.

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read more
6 things you didn't know about sweat
The Huffington Post
We've already debunked elsewhere some of the most common misconceptions about staying hydrated. But what about sweat itself? In an effort to better understand the body's complex heating and cooling system, here are some surprising facts about sweat you may not have known.

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A vision for the future of healthcare
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Everyone has his own opinion of the future of healthcare. Whether it's politically or financially motivated, some believe we're headed for a bureaucratic morass, while others believe healthcare in America can be fixed with the Affordable Care Act.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


What's my real cancer risk? When online calculators don't compute
NPR
Online risk calculators are all the rage these days among public health groups trying to get us to change our unhealthful ways. The World Health Organization developed an online tool that lets you estimate your personal risk of cracking a hip in the next 10 years, for example. You just plug in data about yourself, your lifestyle and your family medical history.
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What if what you 'survived' wasn't cancer?
Bloomberg
You're feeling fine when you go for your annual physical. But your mammogram looks a little funny, or your PSA test is a little high, or you get a CT lung scan and a nodule shows up. You get a biopsy, and the doctor delivers the bad news: You have cancer. Because you don't want to die, you agree to be sliced up and irradiated. Then, fortunately, you're pronounced a "cancer survivor." You're glad they caught it early. But maybe you went through all that pain for nothing.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


What role can employers play in cancer prevention and treatment?
HealthCanal
Employers can have a significant role in improving efforts to prevent and treat diseases such as cancer by introducing and supporting health promotion programs in the workplace. Together, companies can influence healthcare policies and reimbursement and industry practices to support the fight against cancer. Johnson & Johnson's active role in implementing the CEO Cancer Gold Standard program is described in an article in Population Health Management, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Words can change your brain
EverydayHealth.com
According to Dr. Andrew Newberg and Mark Robert Waldman, words can literally change your brain. In their book, "Words Can Change Your Brain," they write: "a single word has the power to influence the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress." Positive words can alter the expression of genes, strengthening areas in our front lobes and promoting the cognitive functioning of the brain. They propel the motivational centers of the brain into action and build resiliency. Conversely, hostile language can disrupt specific genes that play a key part in the production of neurochemicals that protect people from stress.
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Study: Left-brained, right-brained personalities are not real
Fox News
While previous research has indicated that people tend to use one half of their brain more than the other, a new study indicates that there's no evidence to support this claim, Medical News Today reported. Traditionally, people who are thought to be "left brained" are said to be more logical, analytical and detail-oriented thinkers, while "right brained" people tend to be more creative, thoughtful and subjective.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


3 ways that technology interrupts our minds
Psych Central
There are few teens at this point who are not constantly texting and connected to Facebook or other social media. As wonderful as technology has been by bringing information to the masses within seconds, it has also impeded one's ability to think without interruptions and to fully utilize one's mental abilities. With the new school year right around the corner, this article explores some ideas to consider.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Feds: Detroit doctor charged in $35 million Medicare scam gave fake diagnoses (Fox News)
Chocolate everyday keeps brain damage away (Counsel & Heal)
ACA critics, supporters target young adults, the key to healthcare reform success (MedCity News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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