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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will be held November, 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


Obamacare's death of a thousand rate hikes
Forbes
Get ready to pay more for health insurance next year, compliments of Obamacare. A new analysis from PricewaterhouseCoopers projects that average premiums for policies sold through Obamacare’s exchanges will increase 7.5 percent in 2015. In nearly one-third of the 29 states that PwC investigated, premiums will rise by double digits. In Indiana, the average increase will be 15.4 percent. In Kansas, it’s 13.6 percent.
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Health insurance reimbursement may determine cancer screening rates
News-Medical.net
A study published indicates that people living in American states that offer higher Medicaid payments for office visits are more likely to have been screened for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers than those in states giving lower levels of Medicaid support. Although the general requirements of the Medicaid health insurance programme are set by the federal government, each state individually decides its own Medicaid policies determining how much providers are paid for healthcare services and who is eligible for Medicaid.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Health execs offer advice on leadership, ACOs
FierceHealthcare
In one of the most dynamic eras ever for healthcare in the United States, many health executives wonder what skills they need to lead their organizations in general and accountable care organizations in particular. The most important part of a CEO's job is "making sure the culture of the organization supports the mission, vision and values and, accordingly, the strategic initiatives," Dennis Knox, CEO of Antelope Valley Hospital in Lancaster, California, told Becker's Hospital Review.
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ACOs lag in health IT, interoperability advancements
Medical Economics
Accountable care organizations have made few strides in health information technology since early 2013, according to a recent survey from eHealth initiative. Most ACOs have yet to incorporate data beyond immediate clinical or claims-based records, and few are offering more advanced capabilities such as population health, revenue, or customer relationship management systems, according to the survey.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Now Available


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Orenitram is a trademark of United Therapeutics. © 2014 United Therapeutics.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Heart group calls on FDA to quickly regulate e-cigs
USA Today
Electronic cigarettes need to be strongly regulated — and quickly — to prevent another generation of young people from becoming addicted to nicotine, according to the American Heart Association's first policy statement on the products. In its statement, the heart association pointed to studies suggesting that e-cigarettes, which contain nicotine but no tobacco, could serve as a "gateway" drug to addict young people, who may go on to regular cigarettes or smokeless tobacco.
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FDA okays Genzyme pill for Gaucher disease
The Boston Globe
Federal regulators approved for U.S. sale a Genzyme experimental capsule that could become the top-selling pill to treat the rare genetic disorder Gaucher disease. Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug candidate, called Cerdelga, for adults with the most common type of Gaucher disease means the new pill could be on the market within a month.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Tinkering with genes to prevent migraines
PsychCental
Two new drugs in promising clinical trials use genetic engineering to prevent migraine headaches, the third most common and seventh most disabling medical disorder in the world. Both use genetically engineered “monoclonal antibodies” attacking a new target in migraine prevention, a small protein known as the calcitonin gene-related peptide, or CGRP.
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Hangovers are about half genetic
LiveScience
Some people get hangovers after a night of drinking, while others don't, and the reason may be in their genes, a new study of twins in Australia suggests. Researchers looked for links between the study participants' genetic makeups and the number of hangovers the individuals reported experiencing in the past year.
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Study identifies genes tied to colon cancer
Health Canal
Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death among populations around the world. While diet, physical activity and other lifestyle factors can influence the risk of developing the disease, hereditary factors also play an important role.
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A gene that makes you need less sleep?
The New Yorker
Since June, 1957, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been monitoring America’s health habits, tabulating things like whether we smoke, drink, or sit around all day, and how many of us visit our doctors regularly and take our medications at the prescribed times. Until recently, though, one aspect of our behavior largely escaped note: the amount of time we spend sleeping.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Focus on breakfast to improve diet and health
USA Today
Grandmothers, marketers and researchers alike have long touted breakfast as a must-have meal, praising its ability to rev up metabolism, stave off hunger, help calorie watchers keep their weight in check, and improve concentration and cognitive function. But for all the glowing endorsements, there have also been warnings against over-hyping the power of breakfast.
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E-cigarettes should be used as last resort to quit, group says
The Boston Globe
Electronic cigarettes present a conundrum for public health officials. On the one hand, they contain fewer — or perhaps even none — of the cancer-causing substances found in tobacco products “which presents an opportunity for harm reduction if smokers use them as substitutes for cigarettes,” according to the American Heart Association in a new recommendation released.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Obamacare's death of a thousand rate hikes
Forbes
Get ready to pay more for health insurance next year, compliments of Obamacare.

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An aging America: The future of healthcare depends on telehealth
By Karen R. Thomas
As a country, we are living longer and in greater numbers. The number of people over the age of 65 in America is predicted to rise to nearly 80 million by 2040, according to the Administration on Aging.

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What the US healthcare system can learn from Ebola outbreak
NPR
Jeanine Thomas is a well-known patient advocate and active member of ProPublica's Patient Harm Facebook Community. But recently, she contributed in another forum: the World Health Organization.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


An unstoppable killer: New research suggests cancer can't be eradicated
NPR
Since Richard Nixon declared war on cancer in 1971, the National Cancer Institute has poured some $90 billion into research and treatments. Yet a cure remains elusive. Experts have plenty of targets for blame, including a flawed emphasis on treatment over prevention, and big pharma betting on blockbuster treatments that cost billions to develop.
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Researchers have found that Botox could one day be used in treating gastric cancers
redOrbit
Botox is in the news again, and this time it looks like potentially good news for some cancer treatments. Although it still receives mixed reviews as a result of its association with cosmetic procedures and some high-profile failures, the medical world is discovering new ways in which Botox can help treat a wide range of conditions.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Mental health: Living with anxiety
The Huffington Post
As part of a week-long series about mental health in America, HuffPost Live takes a deep dive into anxiety. We speak with people who grapple with it on a daily basis and hear their stories.
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Group bonding can reduce depression risk
Nature World News
According to researchers at the University of Queensland, becoming part of a group helps people with depression cope with their mental health problems. The team states that group activities are an economical way of reducing depression, especially in people who belong to disadvantaged groups. People in low socioeconomic strata can't often access medical and psychological intervention.
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FAST FACTS
"A protein called Kindlin-3 drives breast cancer cells to migrate throughout the body. Inhibiting Kindlin-3 functions with new drugs could prevent the spread of breast cancer, according to the Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Soda ban — bane or need (By Archita Datta Majumdar)
Medicare offers waiver of 3-day rule for some ACOs, bundled payments (Modern Healthcare)
5 things to consider when planning ACOs (FierceHealthPlayer)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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