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Check out JMCM’s new website at www.jmcmpub.org

Seattle Genetics Announces FDA Regular Approval of ADCETRIS® for Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients at High Risk of Relapse or Progression. Click here to view more information.

We wanted you to be aware that the FDA has granted accelerated approval of IBRANCE® (palbociclib) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with ER+/HER2- advanced breast cancer. Click here to see the press release!

Otezla® (apremilast) is approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. Please click here for more information.

OAs part of APhA's longstanding and ongoing commitment to helping its members ensure optimal and safe patient use of prescription medications, nonprescription products, and dietary supplements, APhA convened national pharmacy and medicine leaders and other stakeholders on March 26. Click here for more information .

 



Fall Managed Care Forum: Register today!
NAMCP

Register today for the 2015 Fall Forum being held November 12-13, 2015 at The Bellagio in Las Vegas. Click here to visit the conference website.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


What happens when you can't afford your health insurance
U.S. News & World Report
Getting health insurance is one thing; paying premiums month after month to keep it is another. If you have health insurance through your job, your premium comes out of your paycheck automatically, and unless you have a qualifying life event — like marriage — you're stuck with that policy until open enrollment.
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The problem with GOP plans to sell health insurance across state lines
The New York Times
At the Fox News Republican debate, Donald Trump offered a way to lower healthcare costs: Allow insurers to sell their policies across state lines. “What I’d like to see is a private system without the artificial lines around every state,” he said. “I have a big company with thousands and thousands of employees. And if I’m negotiating in New York or in New Jersey or in California, I have like one bidder. Nobody can bid.” Erasing those lines, he said, would result in “great plans.”
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The importance of evidence-based practice
By Dr. Abimbola Farinde
Researchers, healthcare providers and health policy advocates still continue to debate what specifically defines evidence-based practice. They argue over the merits of the evidence for various interventions and how the evidence is utilized and integrated. Yet the fact still remains that the implementation of evidence-based practice measures is becoming a widely-recognized topic because it focuses on how research findings can appropriately be applied to clinical practice.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Primary care docs reaping the most from shared-savings ACOs
Modern Healthcare
For the second year, the CMS has awarded bonuses to 1 in 4 accountable care organizations working under a Medicare model intended to spur providers to deliver lower-cost care. They will share $422 million out of the $833 million they collectively saved the government in 2014. ACO networks get to decide for themselves how to distribute the money, and primary-care doctors appear to be benefiting the most, according to a review of disclosures by ACOs participating in Medicare's Shared Savings Program.
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Few Medicare ACOs earned bonuses in 2014
Modern Healthcare
Three out of four Medicare accountable care organizations did not slow health spending enough to earn bonuses last year, a continuation of mixed results for an initiative that federal officials have targeted for rapid expansion. Medicare released 2014 results for 353 accountable care organizations, which include hospitals and physician groups that agreed to meet targets for quality and slow spending.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA warns of severe joint pain risk with DPP-4 diabetes drugs
Reuters via Fox News
A class of diabetes drugs that include Merck & Co Inc's Januvia has been linked with severe joint pain, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said. The FDA said it had identified 33 cases of severe joint pain in patients taking a class of drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors between Oct. 16, 2006, when the first one was approved, through Dec. 31, 2013.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


FDA oversight on high-risk apps in mobile health industry
mHealthIntelligence
As the mobile health industry continues to progress and new innovations impact patient care, regulatory agencies are taking part in greater oversight of m-health apps, wearable devices, and remote monitoring tools. From ensuring mobile apps are safe for use among patients to developing new reimbursement policies for healthcare providers offering telemedicine services, federal agencies are driving forward patient engagement and security in the mobile health industry.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Low vitamin D genes linked to MS
BBC
The findings, based on the DNA profiles of tens of thousands of people of European descent, add weight to the theory that the sunshine vitamin plays a role in multiple sclerosis. Scientists are already testing whether giving people extra vitamin D might prevent or ease MS. Experts say the jury is still out.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Getting Patients Back to Better

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What if doctors could heal broken genes?
LiveScience
Science is about asking questions. Sixty years ago, the key question in biology was, "What does the human genetic code look like?" That was followed by, "How many genes make up human DNA?" which itself led to, "Which genes cause diseases?" Now the question is, "What if doctors could repair broken genes?"
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Circadian genes go to sleep every day at the periphery of the nucleus
Phys.org
Mobility between different physical environments in the cell nucleus regulates the daily oscillations in the activity of genes that are controlled by the internal biological clock, according to a study that is published in the journal Molecular Cell. Eventually, these findings may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of diseases linked with disrupted circadian rhythm.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Sugar spell: Breaking away from your sweet tooth's hold
By Natalie Rodriguez
It was a gray day in America earlier this year when the World Health Organization recommended adults and children reduce their daily intake of sugar to less than 10 percent of their total energy intake. In English, that's roughly 25 grams of sugar per day. America's sweet tooth wept in agony, not just from the cavities. The average American consumes 110 grams of sugar daily — a disconcerting 85 grams higher than the WHO's recommended amount.
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What's new with the flu? More vaccine options this season
By Tammy Gibson
It's that time of year again — time to roll up your sleeve for a flu vaccine. Doctors recommend everyone 6 months and older receive an annual flu shot. The flu kills an estimated 23,000 to 36,000 people each year in the United States and costs the nation billions in lost productivity and hospitalizations. Some years, the vaccine works like a charm, but in others — like 2014 — the vaccine is a virtual fail. The reason centers on how the vaccine is created each year.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Researchers may have found 'off switch' for cancer cells
Las Vegas Review-Journal
In a major breakthrough in the battle against cancer, researchers believe they’ve found a way to retrain cancerous cells to die in the same way healthy cells do. A new study out of the Mayo Clinic, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, reveals the discovery of a potential “off switch” for cancerous cells. The key: biological processors called microRNAs.
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Scientists propose attacking bioenergetic metabolism to improve anti-cancer therapies
Medical Xpress
Cancer cells become addicted to glucose, which they use as their regular source of energy to grow and develop. Although this was observed over nine decades ago by the German physiologist, Otto Warburg; there is still not therapeutic strategy today that can effectively take advantage of this special energy requirement. The initial approach appears to be simple: The lack of glucose could specifically induce the death of cancer cells.
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Docetaxel in prostate cancer — the pendulum swings back
Medscape
It's interesting to look back at the history of therapies for prostate cancer. We have taken advantage of the androgen sensitivity in early prostate cancer for decades. Where we ran into trouble, however, was when prostate cancer originally referred to as "androgen independent" became what is now commonly called "castrate resistant."
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Depressed teens may be headed for heart disease
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Adolescence can be a difficult time for both young people and their parents. The normal and often-turbulent hormonal, physical and cognitive changes that occur during this stage of development sometimes make it difficult to recognize and diagnose underlying depression in children that can lead to behavioral problems. Researchers now think teens with major depression or bipolar disorder are at high risk of early heart and blood vessel disease.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The last gasp of fee-for-service? (U.S. News & World Report)
What can go wrong with a private health insurance exchange? A lot (Forbes)
A fat-burning gene may help weight loss (TIME)
Holocaust survivors' trauma lives on in kids' genes (USA Today)
Waves of change: Helping staff navigate the turbulent tides of healthcare (By Christina Thielst)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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