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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
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Obama tells veterans he will fix health system, as new report lists lapses
The New York Times
President Barack Obama on Aug. 26 promised several thousand military veterans that he would fulfill his "sacred trust" to those returning from America's wars by overhauling a dysfunctional healthcare system, even as a new report documented "unacceptable and troubling lapses" in medical treatment.
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Consumers deal with insurance deadline, site glitches
USA Today
Hundreds of thousands of people risk losing their new health insurance policies if they don't resubmit citizenship or immigration information to the government by the end of next week — but the federal Healthcare.gov site remains so glitchy that they are having a tough time complying. Consumers are being forced to send their information multiple times, and many can't access their accounts at all, immigration law experts and insurance agents say.
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Early tax planning may be needed because of the Affordable Care Act
The Washington Post
Having gone through tax season not that long ago, you may not want to face any issues related to your tax situation until next year. But some of you may need to do some tax planning now nonetheless. It has to do with the Affordable Care Act. So here's the deal. If you bought insurance through a federally run or state-run health insurance exchange, also known as the healthcare marketplace, you may have received financial help with the monthly payments. This premium tax credit helps offset the cost of your insurance and is intended to make premiums more affordable.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Unanswered questions about the future of accountable care organizations
FierceHealthPayer
It's still up in the air when the new proposed rule for the most popular program of the accountable care organization, the Medicare Shared Savings Program, will go into effect. Back on July 3, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued its 2015 Physician Fee Schedule, adding revisions to the MSSP. While early results from both public and private ACOs show promise of improving care while reducing costs, the Morning Consult highlights three questions about the future of ACOs that remain unanswered.
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This ACO shows results
Healthcare IT News
In a region dominated by one insurer and teeming with health systems, accountable care models are gaining provider acceptance but still accumulating evidence. Almost four years after introducing accountable care contracts, Philadelphia-based Independence Blue Cross is touting some positive clinical and financial improvements, with participation now including 90 percent of the region's delivery systems.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Will $94 million raised from Ice Bucket Challenge yield cure for ALS?
The Boston Globe
If you haven’t yet taken the Ice Bucket Challenge or seen dozens of videos of others pouring a pail of frigid water over their heads, you're in the minority. For the other 85 percent of Americans, ice bucket fatigue is beginning to set in and one wonders whether the $94 million donated so far to the ALS Association will provide a shot at curing ALS, also known as "Lou Gehrig's Disease," or at least accelerating the discovery of better treatments.
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Multiple vaccines in the works against Ebola
NBC News
U.S. government scientists will start testing an experimental vaccine against Ebola in people soon, starting out with 20 healthy adults. The same vaccine, made by GlaxoSmithKline in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health, will be tested in the coming weeks in Britain, Gambia and Mali. It’s one of several Ebola vaccines in the pipeline.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Ebola's genes inspected for clues
The Spokesman Review
A single funeral caused many. Stephen Gire and other health researchers on the ground in Africa had some hope that the Ebola outbreak was coming under control or at least plateauing in late May. Then came the funeral of a healer in Guinea. More than a dozen of the mourners contracted the disease there, probably by washing or touching the body, and took it to Sierra Leone, according to a new genetic mapping of the Ebola virus that scientists hope will help them understand what makes this killer tick.
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More genes implicated in bipolar disorder
PsychCentral
A newly discovered gene linked with an enzyme that helps to conduct neural signals is the latest piece found of the genetic puzzle of bipolar disorder. The condition, also known as manic-depressive illness, appears to be influenced by at least five areas of the human genome. Researcher Dr. Markus Nothen of the University of Bonn, Germany, said, "There is no one gene that has a significant effect on the development of bipolar disorder. Many different genes are evidently involved and these genes work together with environmental factors in a complex way."
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Flies, humans and worms share common genetic codes
Wall Street OTC
We might think we don't have anything in common with a fly or a worm, but in a real sense, it has been discovered by researchers that humans have a lot of things in common with these. 67 billion gene sequences from worm and fly and human beings were studied by researchers from the NHGRI or National Genome Research Institute. It was found that there was sharing of gene expression patterns between these species, especially in developmental genes.
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Study identifies genetic change in autism-related gene
The Medical Xpress
A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Could losing your sense of smell predict Alzheimer's?
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks the brain's neurons, resulting in loss of memory, thinking and language skills and behavioral changes. It is the most common cause of dementia or loss of intellectual function among people aged 65 and older. With Alzheimer's disease growing fast among the world's aging population, researchers are increasingly focused on searching for new ways to detect and treat the brain-killing disease in its earliest stages. And scientists may have found a new warning sign — a decreased ability to identify odors.
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The health risks of sitting too much
The Huffington Post
Research shows logging long hours on the couch or behind a desk raises the risk of chronic health ills like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, along with premature death—even among those who exercise regularly. In a recent Australian study, people who sat 11 hours or more a day had a 40 percent increased risk of dying over the next three years compared to those who sat for fewer than four hours a day.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Walking a mile a day can cut risk of dying from cancer by 40 percent
The Guardian
People with two of the most common forms of cancer can cut their risk of dying from the disease by as much as 40 percent simply by walking for a mile a day, Macmillan Cancer Support has claimed.

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Obamacare's death of a thousand rate hikes
Forbes
Get ready to pay more for health insurance next year, compliments of Obamacare.

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Mental health: Living with anxiety
The Huffington Post
As part of a week-long series about mental health in America, HuffPost Live takes a deep dive into anxiety. We speak with people who grapple with it on a daily basis and hear their stories.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Scientists create mini lung to test cancer drugs
Wall Street Daily
It's no bigger than a sugar cube ... yet it's powerful enough to transform the entire healthcare industry. Specifically, it could completely revolutionize the way scientists fight cancer. In a remarkable feat of innovation, German scientists have cooked up a miniature lung in the lab.
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Tomatoes can lower risk of prostate cancer
Tech Times
Are you a man who enjoys a salad or maybe a plate of pasta with marinara sauce? Then you might be reducing your likelihood of getting cancer. Men who eat over 10 portions of tomatoes per week have an 18 percent lower risk of getting prostate cancer, according to research done by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Expansion of mental healthcare hits obstacles
The New York Times
The Affordable Care Act has paved the way for a vast expansion of mental health coverage in America, providing access for millions of people who were previously uninsured or whose policies did not include such coverage before. Under the law, mental health treatment is an "essential" benefit that must be covered by Medicaid and every private plan sold through the new online insurance marketplaces.
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Brain images of depressed adults reveal too many network connections related to rumination
The Medical Daily
While "the unexamined life is not worth living," too much self-reflection may be a big-time negative, or so say psychologists who believe rumination — when you think about a problem over and over without coming to a solution — is a risk factor for depression and for reoccurrence of depression. Now, a new study from the University of Illinois at Chicago plainly reveals the startling effects of rumination on the brain.
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FAST FACTS
"A protein called Kindlin-3 drives breast cancer cells to migrate throughout the body. Inhibiting Kindlin-3 functions with new drugs could prevent the spread of breast cancer, according to the Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Mental health: Living with anxiety (The Huffington Post)
Group bonding can reduce depression risk (Nature World News)
E-cigarettes should be used as last resort to quit, group says (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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