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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

The most efficient healthcare systems in the world
The Huffington Post
As supporters and opponents of the Affordable Care Act debate the best way to overhaul a clearly broken healthcare system, it's perhaps helpful to put American medicine in a global perspective. This infographic is based on a recent Bloomberg ranking of the most efficient countries for healthcare, and highlights enormous gap between the soaring cost of treatment in the U.S. and its quality and effectiveness.
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Young adults and low-cost health insurance
U.S. News & World Report
Since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law in 2010, more than 3 million young adults age 19 to 26 have been able to stay on their parents' health insurance policies, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But an estimated 16 million to 19 million others are still uninsured.
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National healthcare reform sparks concern about scams
Los Angeles Times
The national health reform law is expected to open the door for identity theft and insurance scams when millions of uninsured Americans begin enrolling in coverage this fall, officials and advocates warn. The Federal Trade Commission said dozens of consumers have reported fraud since last summer's Supreme Court ruling upholding the law, and officials predict widespread abuse when enrollment begins in October.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Leaders urge FDA to keep up with mHealth
Healthcare IT News
A Washington D.C. law firm known for its work with mHealth companies is asking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to "adopt significant fundamental changes to keep pace with medicine and technology." The request is part of a 12-page white paper submitted to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology by Bradley Merrill Thompson, an attorney with Epstein Becker Green and the legal counsel for the mHealth Regulatory Coalition.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


FDA grants priority review for Nexavar for treatment of thyroid cancer
Healio
The FDA has granted priority review status to the oral multikinase inhibitor sorafenib for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. "We are very pleased that the FDA has chosen to grant Priority Review to sorafenib," Pamela A. Cyrus, M.D., vice president and head of U.S. medical affairs at Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, said in a press release.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Research shows healthy diet may slow cognitive decline
By Denise A. Valenti
The Alzheimer's Association is reporting that an estimated 5.2 million Americans have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in 2013. At the recent Alzheimer's Association International Conference, researchers from all over the world gathered to present and discuss the latest findings of causation, diagnosis and treatments surrounding the topic of Alzheimer's disease and dementias. What was notable in this year's conference was the research supporting the contributions of healthy lifestyles and diet to lower rates of cognitive declines.
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Trying to avoid the freshman 15? There's a dorm for that
The Washington Post
You're 18 years old, headed off to college and you want to maintain the exercise regimen you followed as a high school athlete. Or maybe you're just dreading the freshman 15 that other kids pack on in campus dining halls. Well, there's a dorm for that. A few colleges offer fitness- and wellness-themed residences, places that take schools' increasing interest in their students' health and welfare to another, 24-hour level. They are more philosophies than boot camps, but the kids who live in them love them, and school officials believe they are working.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Should you get sequenced? Not all bad genes predict disease
NBC News
For NBC News chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman, having a "boring genome," is a good problem to have. Snyderman revealed a snapshot of her genetic code on TODAY Wednesday, after having two types of genetic testing. The first, a whole genome sequencing test by Illumina, costs about $5,000. She now has the complete results from it stored on her iPad. "What's fascinating ... is that this is me, right here on a tablet," Snyderman said. "And as we learn more about what genes underlie specific diseases, I'll have this as a reference."
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Gene that causes devastating mitochondrial diseases identified
ScienceDaily
Researchers have identified a novel disease gene in which mutations cause rare but devastating genetic diseases known as mitochondrial disorders. Nine rare, disease-causing mutations of the gene, FBXL4, were found in nine affected children in seven families, including three siblings from the same family.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
The most efficient healthcare systems in the world
The Huffington Post
As supporters and opponents of the Affordable Care Act debate the best way to overhaul a clearly broken healthcare system, it's perhaps helpful to put American medicine in a global perspective.

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read more
5 good things the Affordable Care Act imposed on healthcare
By Mike Wokasch
The U.S. healthcare market is well entrenched with operational complexity, an inefficient cost structure and serious quality issues.

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Mixed signals on employee health insurance
The New York Times
It is hard to know whether to rejoice or lament two striking if somewhat conflicting messages about the costs of employer-sponsored health insurance.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Prostate-cancer therapy comes under attack
The Wall Street Journal
Health insurers are pushing back against one of medicine's most expensive technologies amid growing evidence it may not be better for patients than cheaper options. At least three major insurers have recently decided to stop covering proton beam therapy for early stage prostate cancer or are reviewing their policy, saying that while it is an effective treatment, it is much less cost-effective when compared to the price of comparable treatments.
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Exercise is key to better health in cancer survivors
CBS News
After surviving cancer, patients may find it difficult to return to the same level of physical activity that they were used to before their diagnosis. However, staying active is extremely important. Dr. Karen Basen-Engquist, director of M.D. Anderson's Center for Energy Balance in Cancer Prevention and Survivorship in Houston, Texas, told CBS News that studies show exercise can lower rates of relapse for people with breast and colorectal cancers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


New criteria increase number of men with depression
USA Today
A new study finds that depression may be far more common in men than previously estimated. Women traditionally have been diagnosed with depression about twice as often as men, with about 20 percent of women becoming depressed at some point in their lives. In the past decade, however, some researchers have suggested that they simply weren't asking the right questions when talking to men.
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Mental and substance use disorders 'leading cause of non-fatal illness'
Medical News Today
Researchers say that combined, mental and substance use disorders were the leading cause of non-fatal illness worldwide in 2010, according to a study published in the The Lancet. The study, conducted by researchers from Australia and the U.S., analyzed data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Novel strategies: Side effects with long-term antibiotic treatment (By Dorothy L. Tengler)
Are hospitals already saving money for Medicare? (Bloomberg)
New FDA drug powers tougher on industry, but not without controversy (Healthcare Packaging)
Research shows healthy diet may slow cognitive decline (By Denise A. Valenti)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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