This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Sep. 17, 2013

   NAMCP   AAMCN    AAIHDS    CME/CEU    JMCM    Contact Us  

REGISTER TODAY
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Is the healthcare market competitive?
By Mike Wokasch
Consumers benefit from competition that provides incentives for continuous product improvements and encourages a higher level of service performance. More importantly, competition can help keep prices in check. Competitive markets exist when consumers have multiple purchasing options and choices with transparent pricing. The healthcare market has constrained competition, providing a platform for mediocre quality of care and unsustainable, rising healthcare costs.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Why Obamacare shouldn't force poor seniors into Medicaid
Forbes
The nearly 9 million Americans who are dually eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid have long been poorly served by the healthcare system. These elderly poor and disabled Americans suffer disproportionately from serious medical conditions. In the case of full duals, half initially qualified for Medicare because of disability rather than age, and nearly one-fifth have three or more chronic conditions.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Doctors are an untapped resource in understanding ACA
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Doctors and nurses, who are among the most trusted sources of information about the Affordable Care Act in many patients' opinions, could play a valuable role in helping the public understand the law. But they are among the least used sources from which most people have actually received information. The Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Poll from August found there's plenty of confusion surrounding the ACA and what it might mean to patients. Many believe physicians and nurses can provide the best information about the law, but those conversations aren't taking place.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA announces new labeling guidelines for longer acting painkillers
Forbes
In response to increasing numbers of deaths, injuries and addiction stemming from prescription painkiller abuse, the FDA has issued new labeling guidelines for medical providers who prescribe longer acting painkillers, commonly referred to as opoids. The goal, according to the FDA, is to encourage the safer use of opoids by more responsible and educated prescribing by medical providers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


FDA panel backs drug for early-stage breast cancer
The Associated Press via NBC News
Government cancer experts say a drug from Roche has shown effectiveness as a new option to treat breast cancer before tumor-removing surgery. The Food and Drug Administration panel voted 13-0, with one abstention, that the benefits of Perjeta as an initial treatment for breast cancer outweigh its risks.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Raise a glass of beer — to your health
By Denise A. Valenti
Despite the name, Oktoberfest traditional fall beer celebrations begin in September and extend into October. The biggest Oktoberfest beer bash is held in Munich and is considered to be the world's largest fair. This year — the 180th year the Oktoberfest has been held — will host more than 6 million people from around the world. Today’s Oktoberfest celebrants can not only toast to good food and fun, but also good health.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Antibiotic-resistant bugs have become a common cause of death
The Associated Press via The Washington Post
For the first time, the government is estimating how many people die each year from drug-resistant bacteria. Officials say more than 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses stem from germs that are hard to treat because they've become resistant to drugs. Antibiotics became widely available in the 1940s, and today dozens are used to kill or suppress the bacteria behind everything from strep throat to the plague.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New signs of improvement in the youth obesity epidemic?
USA Today
There's more evidence to suggest the USA's epidemic of childhood obesity is stabilizing, and the reasons may be that kids are eating better and watching less TV. Between 2001 and 2009, U.S. adolescents increased physical activity, ate more fruits and vegetables, ate breakfast more, watched less TV and ate fewer sweets, a new study says.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Americans are living better, longer
The Boston Globe
Recent predictions that the obesity epidemic will lead to shorter lifespans for today's young adults are challenged by a new study conducted by Massachusetts researchers, which suggests a more optimistic outlook: The average 25-year-old today can expect to enjoy at least two extra years of a healthy life compared with those a generation ago.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Committed...
to your dignity

If you're looking for high quality and personal service, you've come to the right place. We offer the best in torso wrap-around ostomy covers. Our rates are competitive, with no hidden fees. www.undercoverdesigns.biz
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAMCP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact James DeBois at 469-420-2618.
MORE


GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Researchers pin down the genetics of going under
Medical Xpress
Falling asleep in your bed at night and being "put to sleep" under general anesthesia — as well as waking up in the morning or coming out of anesthesia — aren't quite the same thing, yet they share some important similarities. Max Kelz, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, along with colleagues, explored the distinctions between anesthetic unconsciousness and sleep by manipulating the genetic pathways known to be involved in natural sleep and studying the resulting effects on anesthetic states.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Are you right- or left-handed? It could be genetic
The Huffington Post
Whether you're a righty or a lefty could depend on your genes, a new study suggests. European researchers identified a network of genes that seem to have a hand — no pun intended — in establishing left and right in embryos, which they say could then have an impact on handedness. "The genes are involved in the biological process through which an early embryo moves on from being a round ball of cells and becomes a growing organism with an established left and right side," study researcher William Brandler, a Ph.D. student in the MRC Functional Genomics Unit at Oxford University, said in a statement.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Is the healthcare market competitive?
By Mike Wokasch
Consumers benefit from competition that provides incentives for continuous product improvements and encourages a higher level of service performance. More importantly, competition can help keep prices in check.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
The healthcare overhaul: What you need to know
The Wall Street Journal
Whatever its larger merits or shortcomings, the federal healthcare overhaul seems likely to benefit one demographic group in particular: The 50-plus crowd. Starting Oct. 1, state-based health insurance exchanges created by the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will open for business.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Obamacare will make us smarter healthcare consumers
Forbes
Obamacare has been described as "the most sweeping power grab in modern American history." Obviously it expands the government's role in healthcare, especially by requiring everyone to have health insurance or pay a penalty, and it will bring up to 21 million people onto the government-paid Medicaid roles.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Electronic nose sniffs out lung cancer
Medscape
Electronic nose technology, first developed for the military to detect chemical warfare, analyzes breath exhalations and can identify lung cancer with a high degree of accuracy, investigators report. "The advantages of such a test are many," said Maris Bukovskis, M.D., from Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital in Riga, Latvia. "It would be cheap, easy to perform, noninvasive and sufficiently accurate as an initial screen."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Cheaper sequencing points cancer drug researchers to 'super responders'
FierceBiotech
As sequencing gets cheaper and scientists begin to unravel the underlying genetic factors in various types of cancer, it is now increasingly possible to find out why once-promising drugs failed in some patient groups but could offer big advances in niche populations. Dr. David Solit, an oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, wanted to solve the mystery of why some patients, called "outliers" or "super responders," have strong recoveries or have long-term benefits from cancer drugs that have little to no positive outcomes in most patients.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Aging US facing a cancer care crisis, report finds
Chicago Daily Herald
The U.S. is facing a crisis in how to deliver cancer care, as the baby boomers reach their tumor-prone years and doctors have a hard time keeping up with complex new treatments, government advisers reported. The caution comes even as scientists are learning more than ever about better ways to battle cancer, and developing innovative therapies to target tumors.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Diet is associated with the risk of depression
Medical Xpress
A healthy diet may reduce the risk of severe depression, according to a prospective follow-up study of more than 2,000 men conducted at the University of Eastern Finland. In addition, weight loss in the context of a lifestyle intervention was associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PTSD treatments show promise
The Boston Globe
One of the primary means of treating post-traumatic stress disorder is a form of therapy that encourages veterans to revisit their most traumatic experiences. Some research suggests reliving those experiences through a virtual world could also help.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    After a decade, Congress moves to fix doctors' Medicare pay (NPR)
Certain bacteria may help ward off obesity (Los Angeles Times)
Sip on this: Do diet drinks make you fatter? (The Conversation via Medical Xpress)
Can gluten-free foods aid weight loss? (By Dr. Georgene Collins)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Managed Care eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Sept. 17, 2013
Sept. 10, 2013
Sept. 3, 2013
Aug. 27, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063