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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade. After five consecutive years of low growth rates, we can expect health spending rates to increase by 5.6 percent for 2014 and an average of 6 percent in the years 2015-23. Traditionally, healthcare spending tracks with economic growth, but the aging baby boomers and increased insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act are also expected to contribute to growth, which will result in the health share of GDP rising to nearly one-fifth of the nation's economy by 2023.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Health law coverage expansion gets tougher
The Wall Street Journal
A nationwide effort to enroll consumers in health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is getting under way, and it is even more complicated than it was in the first year. Insurance companies, states and the Obama administration have two missions for the law's second major enrollment period. They want to draw millions of new, harder-to-attract enrollees to the law's insurance exchanges, while also ensuring that existing customers retain their health plans for 2015. Marketplaces are scheduled to open for enrollment Nov. 15.
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Health insurers flock and flee Obamacare
U.S. News & World Report
As the government prepares for the next season in which Americans can sign-up for new health insurance, shifts in available plans are likely to cause prices to fluctuate. Thanks to the shifting marketplace, those who do their homework could be rewarded. During open enrollment, from Nov. 15 to Feb. 15, Americans can shop for health insurance plans online, using state or federal websites that provide tax breaks to those who qualify.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Survey: ACOs aren't using m-health
mHealthNews
A new survey indicates many of the nation's accountable care organizations are not using m-health or telehealth tools, and that challenges with HIT integration could endanger the future of the ACO movement. The survey, conducted by Premier and the e-health Initiative, found that many ACOs are facing challenges that affect care coordination, patient engagement, physician payment and control adjudication, population health management and quality measurement.
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House bill would allow ACOs to expand use of telehealth services
iHealthBeat
Two lawmakers have introduced a bill that aims to improve the accountable care organization model in part by allowing ACOs to expand telehealth services, Becker's Hospital Review's "Health IT & CIO Review" reports.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA: Noninvasive devices may help migraines
HealthDay News via WebMD
Two new prescription devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may provide some relief for people with migraine headaches who don't tolerate migraine medications well, according to a new study.
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FDA cracks down on unproven Ebola cures
TIME
On Sept. 23, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter to Rima Laibow and Ralph Fucetola of Natural Solutions Foundation informing them that the company’s products, including Silver Sol Nano Silver and High Potency CBD Hemp Oil, which are marketed as Ebola treatments, violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Study: Genes may determine whether you like taste of alcohol
LiveScience via Fox News
Whether or not you like the taste of alcohol may be in your genes, new research suggests. In the study, people with one version of a bitterness taste receptor gene said they found an alcoholic drink to be less bitter-tasting than those with a different version of the gene, according to the findings published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
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Researchers: Malaria severity influenced by 5 human genes
Medical News Today
Writing in the journal Nature Genetics, the team, including Dr. Sarah Dunstan of The Nossal Institute of Global Health at the University of Melbourne in Australia, reports how it found five genes that have a complex role in either protecting or making people more susceptible to severe malaria.
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Poverty's vicious cycle can affect our genes
The Wall Street Journal
From the inside, nothing in the world feels more powerful than our impulse to care for helpless children. But new research shows that caring for children may actually be even more powerful than it feels. It may not just influence children's lives — it may even shape their genes. As you might expect, the genomic revolution has completely transformed the nature/nurture debate.
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Jumping genes vs. repressor genes: Never-ending struggle shaped human genome
Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
Nietzsche had no idea how right he was, but then he knew nothing of the genome’s internal struggles. One of these struggles, it turns out, has had no less a consequence than distinguishing the human genome from the genomes of other primates. This struggle, to get to the point, is that which is between the genes that would jump — viral remnants known as retrotransposons — and the genes that would repress them.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade.

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Solidarity vs. solitary: Why collaboration means better healthcare
By Karen R. Thomas
Historically, healthcare has been adept at achieving highly focused and specialized solutions. However, some critics consider the segmented way that healthcare establishments have operated in the past far too solitary for today's wider and more inclusive care goals.

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West Africa's future darkening as Ebola cases skyrocket
By Lauren Swan
The WHO and CDC are estimating the total death toll of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to end somewhere around 20,000, but others have predicted over 4 million.

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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Myth or reality? The dreaded 'freshman 15'
By Denise A. Valenti
Just after parents waved goodbye to their newly enrolled college students this fall, it began. The now-independent students had their first meals in the dormitory cafeteria, and the "freshman 15" weight gain started. An estimated 21 million students enrolled in college this fall, and 13 million of these are full-time students. College freshmen typically gain weight at a higher rate than other young adults, and the majority of that weight is gained before November. Why do freshmen pack on the pounds so quickly? There are several factors at play.
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Several vaccine choices this flu season
The Washington Post
The flu. Fever, chills, aches and pains, and sometime gobs of snot. Usually there’s nothing you can do but lie in bed, take some aspirin and sip chicken soup. Sometimes flu is a setup for serious complications such as bacterial pneumonia; in some people, flu can worsen chronic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Study: Daily dose of aspirin may cut prostate cancer risk
Bloomberg via Chicago Tribune
Men who take a daily dose of aspirin or similar anti-inflammatory medicine may also reduce their risk of developing prostate cancer, researchers said. The study, presented at an American Association for Cancer Research meeting, found that men who regularly used anti-inflammatory pain pills had a 13 percent lower risk of prostate cancer and 17 percent fewer dangerous, high-grade tumors.
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Early sign of pancreatic cancer identified by researchers
redOrbit
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer — an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear. The research is being published online by the journal Nature Medicine.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Afterschool exercise program boosts kids' fitness and cognition
Counsel & Heal
Exercise is good for physical and mental health regardless of age, which is why so many programs have been created to encourage people to be more active. In a new study, researchers examined the effects of after-school exercise programs on children between the ages of 7 and 9. The team discovered that these programs could help boost the kids' fitness and cognition.
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Let's stop assuming people know what mental health is
The Huffington Post
The White House had a briefing on mental health and suicide prevention in honor of Suicide Prevention month. Advocates, professionals and organizations often use the words, "mental health," in a way that assumes everyone knows what mental health is. Unfortunately, that's not true.
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FAST FACTS
"A large percentage of foodborne disease outbreaks are spread by contaminated hands. Appropriate hand washing practices can reduce the risk of foodborne illness and other infections."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    West Africa's future darkening as Ebola cases skyrocket (By Lauren Swan)
Treating migraines: More ways to fight the pain (FDA.gov)
US: We'll pay for health insurance
World: Not us
(CNBC)
CMS: ACOs improve quality, save money (Bloomberg BNA)
Drugs for anxiety, sleep linked to Alzheimer's disease (By Denise A. Valenti)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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