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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30. The CDC and other key government officials have converged on the Dallas metropolitan area as contacts are identified and educated on signs and symptoms of the disease. As the story unfolded, hospital officials confirmed that the patient had told a hospital nurse of his recent travel from Liberia before being released from the hospital. It appears a few lessons can be learned from this situation. Unfortunately, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost — human lives.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Measure, Monitor Immunoglobulin Treatment Outcomes
BioFeedback for immunoglobulin is a health outcomes reporting program that provides clinical feedback on the use of immunoglobulin in autoimmune-related disorders. Physicians and medical directors can now deploy clinical interventions when they have the greatest impact on healthcare quality and costs.

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Walmart plans health coverage shopping
The Associated Press via CBS MoneyWatch
Walmart is taking one-stop shopping to another area: Health insurance. The world's largest retailer plans to work with DirectHealth.com, an online health insurance comparison site and agency, to allow shoppers to compare coverage options and enroll in Medicare plans or the public exchange plans created under the Affordable Care Act.
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Health plan cancellations are coming, but for relatively few
The New York Times
People are starting to get letters telling them their health insurance plans have been cancelled because of the Affordable Care Act. Because the letters will go out just before the midterm congressional elections, they are likely to get a lot of attention. There have been several stories this past week. But the people affected will represent only a small fraction of the population with health insurance.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


ACO adoption of HIT varies
Health IT Outcomes
ACOs aren’t only adopting m-health and telehealth tools, according to a survey by Premier and the eHealth Initiative. Premier and the eHealth Initiative have released the results of an ACO survey focusing on health IT. These organizations found that, overall, ACOs are struggling to adopt IT and their adoption of certain types is incredibly varied.
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Next stage of ACO evolution: Bundled payments
FierceHealthcare
Despite the mixed results so far of Medicare accountable care organizations, a new issue brief from the Navigant Center for Healthcare Research and Policy Analysis concludes that the traditional model is here to stay, although it will continue to evolve.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves use of experimental Ebola drug
The Hill
The Food and Drug Administration approved the use of an experimental drug that has been hailed as one of the pharmaceutical industry's best chances at fighting the Ebola virus. Chimerix, a North Carolina-based biopharmaceutical company, announced that it has received approval to administer an antiviral drug called brincidofovir that has successfully treated Ebola in lab tests.
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As medical imaging moves from 2-D to 3-D, FDA rushes to keep up
The Washington Post
At the Food and Drug Administration, a small team of scientists is investigating how 3-D imaging — the technology used to create more realistic animations in video games and movies — could transform medical screening devices. The scientists are focused on early breast cancer detection; in a process known as tomosynthesis, new screening machines take low-dose X-rays from various angles, overlaying them to produce a 3-D rendering of a patient’s breast.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Scientists identify more than 400 genes that influence height
Medical News Today
In what is the largest genome-wide association study so far, an international research team has found more than 400 genes that influence height — nearly doubling the number of height-related genes identified in previous research. The researchers say their findings, reached by analyzing genome-wide data from more than 250,000 people, can explain around 20 percent of height heritability in humans, increasing from 12 percent prior to this study.
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Genes can cause stress-induced weight gain, disease
Parade
Prone to anxiety, depression and just being ticked off? According to Duke Medicine researchers, that could make you hard-wired to gain weight — something that can cause heart disease or diabetes. About 13 percent of Caucasians might carry a genetic susceptibility to weight gain as a result of stress, the scientists say.
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From kale to pale ale, a love of bitter may be in your genes
NPR
The word bitter can make some of us wince. In conversation, we talk of "a bitter pill to swallow" or "bittersweet" memories. But if you're puzzled by the bad emotional rap on bitter — perhaps you even like the taste of bitter greens or bitter beer — it may say something about your genes. Scientists have been studying a particular taste receptor gene to understand why some of us may be more predisposed to liking bitter foods and hoppy beers.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30.

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West Africa's future darkening as Ebola cases skyrocket
By Lauren Swan
The WHO and CDC are estimating the total death toll of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to end somewhere around 20,000, but others have predicted over 4 million.

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CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade.

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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


WHO: Ebola doesn't spread through the air like a cold
USA Today
With some Americans on edge over the news of the country's first Ebola patient, the World Health Organization issued a statement clarifying how the virus does and doesn't spread. While the virus is new to many Americans, infectious disease specialists have been fighting Ebola since the first outbreak four decades ago.
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When is 'awareness' awareness month?
TIME
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which means it’s time to briefly contemplate getting a mammogram while munching on a pink cookie. But it’s also Domestic Violence Awareness Month, so you should probably tweet angrily about the NFL. And AIDS Awareness Month, so why not finish watching The Normal Heart?
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Top 10 painkillers in US
HCP Live
The nation’s most popular opioid will be more difficult to get starting Oct. 6. As part of federal efforts to curb prescription drug abuse, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency is reclassifying hydrocodone-combination drugs as a schedule two controlled substance.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Advice to women considering preventative mastectomy
HealthNewsDigest
Last year, award-winning actress Angelina Jolie made the surprising announcement that she had both breasts removed to reduce her risk of getting cancer. That decision brought a lot of attention to the controversial concept of preventative mastectomies. Geisinger Health System, a leading integrated health services organization respected for its development of innovative care models, explains what women should consider when deciding if a preventative mastectomy is right for them.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Mental Illness Awareness Week puts spotlight on treatment
By Jessica Taylor
A judge in Alexandria, Virginia, recently found a cab driver not guilty of shooting a police officer in the head during an attack last year. The judge stated that the cab driver, Kashif Bashir, did not understand what he was doing when he shot the officer in the head. Bashir had long suffered from paranoid schizophrenia, and the court determined he was insane at the time of the shooting. This illness and many others are being put into spotlight during Mental Illness Awareness Week. The first full week of October was established by Congress in 1990 as MIAW in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness' efforts to raise mental illness awareness.
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Behavioral health deserves — and demands — its own Cabinet-level agency
The Boston Globe
Mental ilness. Behavioral health. Addiction. These words evoke judgment, shame and stigma from much of the population. Even as medicine has legitimized these clinical conditions, society has resisted accepting them and the individuals they afflict. It is often this subconscious lack of acceptance, or even subconscious blame, that keeps us from helping these individuals in a coordinated fashion.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade (By Christina Thielst)
FDA: Noninvasive devices may help migraines (HealthDay News via WebMD)
Myth or reality? The dreaded 'freshman 15' (By Denise A. Valenti)
Health insurers flock and flee Obamacare (U.S. News & World Report)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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