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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute


Experts: Ebola transmission low, but risk higher for healthcare workers
Fox News
After a nurse who cared for the Ebola victim in Dallas tested positive for the disease, questions have arisen as to the protection and training of healthcare workers. Unlike the nursing assistant in Spain who reportedly became infected after touching her face with her protective glove, the Texas healthcare worker — who is said to have worn full personal protective equipment — has said she doesn’t know how she contracted the disease.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Measure, Monitor Immunoglobulin Treatment Outcomes
BioFeedback for immunoglobulin is a health outcomes reporting program that provides clinical feedback on the use of immunoglobulin in autoimmune-related disorders. Physicians and medical directors can now deploy clinical interventions when they have the greatest impact on healthcare quality and costs.

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Remember when Obamacare would stop health insurers from canceling policies?
Forbes
President Barack Obama’s now-discredited assertion that “if you like your policy, you can keep it” has overshadowed another bogus promise: that his healthcare reform law would stop health insurers from canceling policies. The difference between the two failed promises is that the first one was meant to reassure Americans who liked their health coverage that nothing in Obamacare would force them to lose it.
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CDC chief: US needs to rethink Ebola infection controls
Reuters
The case of a Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a dying Liberian patient shows that the United States needs to rethink how it addresses infection control as an outbreak of the deadly virus spreads beyond West Africa, a top U.S. health official said. Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said health authorities are still investigating how the nurse became infected while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan in an isolation ward at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Experts say success of ACOs hinges on patient engagement
U.S. News & World Report
Moderator Michael Morella introduced the session on accountable care organizations by saying that they are often described as “Experimental, works in progress ... I think we’re all probably learning as we go.” There are currently 350 ACOs serving millions of Americans. The idea behind them is to provide better quality care at a lower cost, in a system that makes the healthcare system accountable for patient outcomes.
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The financial highs and lows of Pioneer ACOs
FierceHealthcare
The trail blazed by Pioneer accountable care organizations is bumpier for some ACOs than for others, according to financial data released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Of the 32 original Pioneer ACOs, 18 reported gross savings in the first year.
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To find out how to feature your company in the NAMCP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves new hepatitis C drug, Harvoni
Kaiser Health News
Insurers and patients are decrying the cost for the new drug, nearly $95,000 for a 12-week course of treatment, which is more expensive than Gilead's other hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi. But unlike some hepatitis C treatments, Harvoni can be taken without injections usually given to hepatitis C patients.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Genetic testing for Alzheimer's — without revealing the results
The Wall Street Journal
Doctors are devising new ways to shield patients from information about their odds for disease as genetic testing becomes more common in research, fertility treatment and other areas. Svetlana Rechitsky and her colleagues at Reproductive Genetic Innovations, a Northbrook, Ill., genetics lab for infertility clinics, took blood samples from a patient undergoing in vitro fertilization and cheek swabs from the patient’s parents.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  InSightec - World Leader in MRgFUS

MRgFUS is being used in clinics across America to treat uterine fibroids and pain palliation for metastatic bone tumors. It’s a completely non-invasive procedure performed on an outpatient basis where patients report an improvement in QoL within days, not weeks. Discover InSightec now.
 


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30.

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West Africa's future darkening as Ebola cases skyrocket
By Lauren Swan
The WHO and CDC are estimating the total death toll of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to end somewhere around 20,000, but others have predicted over 4 million.

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CMS projects faster health spending growth over next decade
By Christina Thielst
The Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently released new estimates from its analysis of American health spending in the coming decade.

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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Study: Love of coffee at least partly genetic
Reuters
Need that cup of joe to get going in the morning? Or avoid it because java tends to make you strung out? Either way, the reasons may be written in your genes. A new analysis of tens of thousands of human genomes identified six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking that may help explain why individuals respond differently to coffee.
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First healthier sodas, now healthier food
By Archita Datta Majumdar
The world's leading soda makers — Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and the Dr Pepper Snapple Group — recently announced a drastic calorie cut in their drinks. But it seems that they are not the only ones bitten by the "go healthy" bug. In 2010, 16 major food and beverage companies joined hands with the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation. They announced that they would focus on reducing 1.5 trillion calories in their products by 2015. They have already made good on their word.
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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Cancer patients finally get the ER they deserve
LiveScience via Yahoo News
You'll probably need emergency care at some point in your life, and while no one likes going to the emergency department, for cancer patients, it can be especially stressful. Even seemingly minor medical issues — like fever, dehydration or viral infections — can quickly turn serious.
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10 things to do now to reduce your breast cancer risk later
Today
Long before we get our first pimple, budding breasts remind us that we're women in training. We love them, we hate them. We want them to grow bigger, we wish they'd stop growing, we wonder why this one is smaller than the other, why men are staring at them — and why they're not.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Why schools should screen their students' mental health
TIME
Schools should be a first line of defense for catching young people at risk for mental health issues from depression to ADHD, a pair of new reports says. Kids and adolescents spend a significant amount of their time in school, yet providing mental health screenings and care is not an overarching requirement for many schools.
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Fixing the broken mental health system
The Huffington Post
Martin was 20 years old when he was arrested for the second time. Responding to auditory hallucinations, his aggressive behaviors endangered people on the street and in his apartment building. While incarcerated at Rikers Island, he received antipsychotic medication.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Walmart plans health coverage shopping (The Associated Press via CBS MoneyWatch)
Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas (By Joan Spitrey)
Health plan cancellations are coming, but for relatively few (The New York Times)
WHO: Ebola doesn't spread through the air like a cold (USA Today)
Top 10 painkillers in US (HCP Live)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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