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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Obama: Healthcare website problems unacceptable
USA Today
President Barack Obama said that problems with the new healthcare website are unacceptable, but argued that the law overall will benefit millions of Americans. While Healthcare.gov "hasn't worked as smooth as it was supposed to have worked," Obama said in a White House speech that thousands of once-uninsured Americans have signed up for coverage.
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Physician burnout: No one cares — but you should
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Have you read the articles over the last several months about physician burnout and fatigue? I’ll admit that as someone in the physician fishbowl, I’m on the inside and hear a lot about physician burnout that most of the public may not see. Doctors are upset and having significant emotional distress because of their chosen field, but many people don’t seem concerned. The problem is that the burned-out physician with fatigue and the resulting lack of focus can most certainly affect all of us.
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Driving a new bargain on healthcare
The New York Times
The Affordable Care Act has gotten off to a rocky start. Federal and state online health insurance exchanges, which opened for business at the beginning of the month, have been bedeviled by technical snags. And opposition to the law from some House Republicans blocked funding for the entire federal government, leading to its partial shutdown.
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Efforts to reduce waste in healthcare leads to job loss for many
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Job reports indicate hospitals and health systems are laying people off in quantities not seen since 2009. But the news should not be viewed as a cut in services. Rather, an effort to improve efficiencies and reduce waste, industry insiders say. For the third time in five months, the healthcare sector announced the most job cuts of any other industry, according to a recent layoff report prepared by the Chicago-based outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Want to get published?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Managed Care eNews, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you’re interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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FDA panel endorses miltefosine for leishmaniasis
Medscape
A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has endorsed miltefosine capsules for the treatment of visceral, cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis. The FDA's Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee took three separate votes on the efficacy and safety profile of Paladin Labs Inc's alkyllysophospholipid analogue miltefosine.
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Actelion wins crucial FDA approval for next-gen lung disease drug Opsumit
FierceBiotech
The FDA came through with an approval for Actelion's pulmonary arterial hypertension drug Opsumit, its next-gen successor to the franchise drug Tracleer. And the Swiss company's shares shot up 7 percent on the news. The approval comes as no great surprise. The company had been steadily doing the rounds with regulators, armed with positive late-stage data.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Learning new skills keeps aging minds sharp
Medical News Today
We are constantly reminded to "use it or lose it," and new research from the University of Texas at Dallas shows the same is true for keeping your brain up to speed. No one likes the idea of slowing down as they age, but a new study suggests that challenging yourself to learn a new skill can bring noticeable benefits to an aging mind.
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How checking out Instagram affects your diet
Women's Health via Fox News
You might want to tell your friends to cool it with those drool-worthy brunch photos on Instagram — or at least steer clear of them before your next meal. Overloading on food porn can actually make your real meal less satisfying, according to a new study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology.
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When it comes to the good cholesterol, fitness trumps weight
ScienceDaily
There's no question that high levels of good cholesterol — also known as high-density lipoprotein — seem to be protective against heart disease. Rather than depositing fat into the blood vessels the way the "bad" cholesterol — low-density lipoprotein — does, HDL appears to carry cholesterol away from blood vessels to the liver. From there, the liver processes it for removal from the body. However, adequate levels of HDL might not be enough.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


New collaborative project aims to discover genes underlying rare genetic diseases
News-Medical.net
University of Cambridge, Genomics England Ltd., and Illumina, Inc. announced the start of a three-year project that will sequence 10,000 whole genomes of children and adults with rare genetic diseases. The project represents a pilot for Genomics England Ltd., which will provide 2,000 samples, and marks the beginning of the national endeavor to sequence 100,000 genomes in the U.K. National Health Service, announced recently by the Prime Minister, David Cameron.
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Environmental factors 'turn on and off' cancer related genes
Medical Xpress
Research performed at the Center of Research and Advanced Studies has identified that certain food and lifestyle habits can turn on or off the expression of cancer related genes. If this changes in the activity of genes are detected during the first stages of the disease, is possible to detain its appearance.
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'Pain genes' identified by DNA sequencing
Medical News Today
Researchers have identified hundreds of variants in a patient's genetic code that predict which people are more susceptible to persistent chronic pain following amputation. Dr. Andrew D. Shaw, associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues conducted the study on 49 military service members who had amputations and persistent pain.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Obama: Healthcare website problems unacceptable
USA Today
President Barack Obama said that problems with the new healthcare website are unacceptable, but argued that the law overall will benefit millions of Americans.

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read more
Hospitals play with Medicare patients' status
ModernHealthcare
A growing number of senior citizens are ensnared in a Medicare crackdown on hospitals over costly inpatient admissions.

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The Affordable Care Act: They gave it the wrong name
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Most Americans are thinking this major new piece of healthcare legislation, the Affordable Care Act, is going to make health insurance more affordable. Why?

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


When should men be screened for prostate cancer?
CBS News
CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook and CBS News contributor Dr. David Agus joined "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss the major medical story. An estimated 240,000 Americans are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year, and almost 30,000 die, making it the second-leading cause of cancer death for men. Current screening guidelines say men over 50 can consider being tested for prostate cancer. However, screening is not recommended for men over the age of 75.
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Vitamins might reduce breast cancer mortality
Medscape
Older women who developed invasive breast cancer while taking multivitamin supplements with minerals had a 30 percent lower rate of breast cancer mortality than women who did not take supplements, according to an analysis of data from the Women's Health Initiative. The finding was published online in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.
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Breast cancer breakdown: Genetic testing
ABC News
Some women with a family history of breast cancer have genetic mutations that raise their risk. And while genes are just one risk factor for the disease, knowing your status can help you make some important decisions. Women with mutations in the genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 are five times more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Traumatic life events biggest cause of anxiety, depression
ScienceDaily
A study by psychologists at the University of Liverpool has found that traumatic life events are the biggest cause of anxiety and depression, but how a person thinks about these events determines the level of stress they experience. Researchers from the University's Institute of Psychology, Health and Society analyzed the responses of over 32,000 participants, aged 18 — 85 years, who completed the BBC's "Stress Test," an online survey to explore the causes and consequences of stress.
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Oreos may be as addictive as cocaine
TIME
If you have ever found yourself unable to resist just one more Oreo, you're not alone. That "stuff" is like crack, neurologically speaking. A new study from Connecticut College shows that Oreos are as addictive as cocaine, at least for lab rats. According to the new study, eating the iconic black and white cookies activated more neurons in the rat brain's "pleasure center" than drugs such as cocaine.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Eat right, sleep tight (The Washington Post)
Just how much does HealthCare.gov cost? (Fox News)
Apples provide upgrade to your operating system (By Denise A. Valenti)
Happy marriage may depend on your genes (CBS News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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