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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

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Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

From uninsured to covered: PAs at the forefront of the ACA
By Maria Frisch
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was first signed into law on March 23, 2010, and has remained on course for full implementation in January 2014. It has been contended that this law will fundamentally change nearly every aspect of healthcare, from insurance to the final delivery of care. The largest and most important provision of the act is the so-called "individual mandate," which will effectively require all Americans to purchase health insurance by taxing those who do not do so by the 2014 deadline. What does all of this mean for physician assistants?
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Health insurance options aren't limited to government exchanges
The New York Times
With so much attention being paid to the troubled debut of the Obama administration's health insurance exchanges, another alternative has largely gone unnoticed: Unless you live in Washington, D.C., or Vermont, you can also buy insurance outside the exchanges — by going directly to insurance brokers, agents or company websites.
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A Medicare primer just in time for 2014 enrollment
Tampa Bay Times
Healthcare has dominated the news lately, but do not confuse Obamacare with Medicare. They have nothing to do with each other. Medicare will operate pretty much as it always has. If you are new to Medicare, or just want a refresher, here are some questions and answers on the basics.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Pure hydrocodone, stronger than Vicodin, approved by FDA
The Associated Press via CBS News
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a stronger, single-ingredient version of the painkiller hydrocodone, the widely-abused prescription medicine for chronic pain. The agency said in a statement it approved the pill Zohydro ER for patients with pain that requires, daily, around-the-clock treatment that cannot be addressed with other drugs.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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FDA approves Perjeta for neoadjuvant breast cancer treatment
FDA.gov
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Perjeta as part of a complete treatment regimen for patients with early stage breast cancer before surgery. Perjeta is the first FDA-approved drug for the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Perjeta was approved in 2012 for the treatment of patients with advanced or late-stage HER2-positive breast cancer.
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FDA shift on painkillers was years in the making
The New York Times
When Heather Dougherty heard the news that the Food and Drug Administration had recommended tightening how doctors prescribed the most commonly used narcotic painkillers, she was overjoyed. Fourteen years earlier, her father, Dr. Ronald J. Dougherty, had filed a formal petition urging federal officials to crack down on the drugs.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


It's flu season: Should you get a shot?
Reuters
When her law office offered flu shots in mid-October, Kelly Walsh, a paralegal in Boston, hesitated. Walsh didn't get vaccinated last year and didn't get sick. The year before, she had flu-like symptoms for a week after getting the shot. "I also worried if everyone at work knew I got a flu shot, it'll be harder to take sick days if I do get the flu," says Walsh, 38.
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Stroke prevention study: Medication plus lifestyle changes safe, effective than surgical interventions
News-Medical.net
The final results of a stroke prevention study in patients with narrowed brain arteries confirm earlier findings: Medication plus lifestyle changes are safer and more effective at preventing stroke than a surgical technique called stenting. Enrollment in the trial was halted two years ago when it became apparent that stenting was associated with a higher risk of early strokes and death.
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Doctors' Rx: Make a plan to manage kids' media use
USA Today
In an age when exposure to TV, smartphones, computers, tablets and all forms of social media play a dominant role in the lives of American kids and teens, many families have very few rules in place to manage their children's media use. But for their well-being, that should change, the nation's largest group of children's physicians advises.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Next-generation sequencing identifies genes associated with speech disorder
Medical Xpress
A collaborative team of researchers has used next generation sequencing to identify clinically relevant genetic variants associated with a rare pediatric speech disorder. The findings are published in the Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders.
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Obesity may be caused by 'hunger gene'
Medical News Today
Some people are able to tuck into chocolate every day and not gain weight, while others struggle to keep their weight down regardless of what they eat. Exactly why this is has been unclear, but now researchers point to a genetic mutation as the cause. Researchers from the University of Cambridge in the U.K. say that mutation of a gene called KSR2 may cause continued hunger pangs in patients who are obese, as well as slow their metabolism — the rate at which the body burns calories.
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11 new gene variants linked to Alzheimer's disease
CBS News
In the largest genetic analysis of Alzheimer's ever completed, scientists have discovered 11 new genes that may be tied to the late-onset form of the dementia disease. Scientists scanned the brains of 74,076 older volunteers with Alzheimer's and others who did not have the disease in 15 countries to come up with their findings.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
From uninsured to covered: PAs at the forefront of the ACA
By Maria Frisch
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was first signed into law on March 23, 2010, and has remained on course for full implementation in January 2014.

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Physician burnout: No one cares — but you should
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Have you read the articles over the last several months about physician burnout and fatigue? I’ll admit that as someone in the physician fishbowl, I’m on the inside and hear a lot about physician burnout that most of the public may not see.

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Obama: Healthcare website problems unacceptable
USA Today
President Barack Obama said that problems with the new healthcare website are unacceptable, but argued that the law overall will benefit millions of Americans.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


HIV drugs may get new role in fighting cancer
Reuters
A type of HIV medicine that stops the AIDS virus from entering immune system cells could in future be put to work against cancer in new combination therapies being developed by drug companies. Interest in using so-called CCR5 inhibitors to fight tumors was fueled last year when U.S. researchers, testing the drugs on mice, reported a marked reduction in aggressive breast cancer cells spreading to the animals' lungs.
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You don't have to fear breast cancer
Health.com via CNN
Dr. Laura Esserman and Beth Crawford: Since Angelina Jolie's brave op-ed in The New York Times, many women have called my clinic asking if, like Jolie, they should get genetic testing or a bilateral mastectomy. But the choice that she made is not for everyone. That's why I want to share what you should know about reducing your risk of breast cancer, whether you have a family history or not.
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2 women turned to writing to cope with breast cancer
USA Today
Treatment for breast cancer can take a lot of courage, but it can also inspire creativity. Two women turned to their pens — and their laptops &mdahs; to cope with the emotional and physical tests they endured through breast cancer treatment.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Joe Biden: New frontier for mental health
The Associated Press via POLITICO
Vice President Joe Biden said that the country is on the cusp of what he called "remarkable changes" in the treatment of mental illness. Speaking at a Boston forum on mental health to mark the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's signing of the Community Mental Health Act, Biden said the human brain is the new frontier for exploration in 2013.
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Kids with head injuries may be prone to depression
HealthDay News via WebMD
Children who've suffered a concussion or other head injury seem to have a much higher-than-average rate of depression, a new study finds. Using data from a U.S. health survey, researchers found that children and teenagers who'd ever sustained a brain injury were much more likely to have ever been diagnosed with depression.
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Study: Talk therapy may ease health-related anxiety
Reuters
Talk therapy performed by nurses and other clinic staff may help people with health anxiety stop worrying about being sick when they're not, a new study suggests. The goal of so-called cognitive behavior therapy, or CBT, is to help people understand how their thoughts and attitudes affect how they feel and how they respond to situations. It then addresses practical steps people can take to improve negative thoughts and outcomes.
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Behavior problems in preschool? Genes may be responsible for aggressive acting out
Medical Daily
Preschoolers and kids who attend child care centers may experience behavioral problems not solely through environmental factors, but because of genetic predispositions, a recent study finds. The reasons behind such instances of acting out have long been debated by researchers who gravitate toward one of two camps: either they point to how children are socialized, either at home or at the centers themselves; or they fall into a camp that upholds deeper, innate tendencies encoded in the child's DNA.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Efforts to reduce waste in healthcare leads to job loss for many (By Pamela Lewis Dolan)
When it comes to the good cholesterol, fitness trumps weight (ScienceDaily)
Learning new skills keeps aging minds sharp (Medical News Today)
Environmental factors 'turn on and off' cancer related genes (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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