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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Dec. 10, 2013

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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

Why HealthCare.gov should have been a mobile app
By Alex Bratton
Of all the problems with the HealthCare.gov site, perhaps the most baffling is why it was created as a website in the first place. The main target of the HealthCare.gov website is young, healthy millennials, those aged 18-29 years old. Since millennials don't run up big healthcare bills, their monthly premiums will subsidize the insurance benefits of nearly 4.3 million older and less healthy Americans. The problem with HealthCare.gov is that these millennials don't get their information the same way as older generations.
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Health insurance exchanges and the innovator's dilemma — Is the future costovation?
Forbes
It's a heady time in the U.S. health insurance industry. Over 30 million Americans are expected to acquire coverage as the Affordable Care Act takes effect, yet the boon of new customers is offset by a gnawing fear that profit margins will vanish. Due to the ACA and economic pressures, health insurers that have thrived since the World War II now face tough choices, and their responses will shape the future of healthcare overall.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Medicare patients will get a financial break in 2014
MarketWatch
Medicare beneficiaries got some good news this fall, when government officials announced that the part B monthly premium and annual deductible would remain flat for 2014. The cost picture is more complicated when it comes to other parts of Medicare, however, and beneficiaries face a narrowing window to make changes to coverage before open enrollment ends on Dec. 7.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


Clock is ticking: New acetaminophen combo limitations coming soon
By Jason Poquette
Beginning in January, manufacturers of combination prescription products containing acetaminophen are expected to limit their APAP content to no more than 325 mg per dose. The significance of this is that many narcotic combination products currently being dispensed will soon no longer be compliant with these guidelines. The most significant impact for this group would be the changes related to hydrocodone/acetaminophen combination products, many of which still contain 500 mg of APAP or more.
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FDA approves faster, easier treatment for hepatitis C
USA Today
A new medication for chronic hepatitis C that can be paired with other drugs to make treatment of the liver-damaging disease faster, easier and more effective got approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The new medication, called sofosbuvir and made by Gilead Sciences Inc., is part of a "revolution in treatment," says Douglas Dieterich, a specialist in liver disease at Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York. Dieterich is a consultant to Gilead and other drug companies.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Single gene, once under radar, helps drive 1/100 cancers
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
When studying genetic drivers of cancer, scientists often focus on genes that are mutated at a high rate, in single type of cancer. But an alternative approach is possible — focusing on genes that mutate at low rates, in many types of cancer. This alternative approach, taken by researchers centered at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has identified a gene that drives the development of tumors in over 1 percent of all cancer patients.
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Scientists identify important new genes for epilepsy
New-Medical.net
Scientists screening the DNA of large cohorts for known and suspected epilepsy associated genes are finding that, while some genes are implicated in discrete phenotypes or forms of epilepsy, other genes are implicated in a wider range of phenotypes. Although ion channel genes are a common cause of epilepsy, the researchers also report a significant number of epilepsy patients with mutations in non-ion channel genes. The studies have important implications for treatment, prognosis and risk counseling.
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Study: 'Mindfulness' meditation alters gene expression
The Huffington Post
It's no secret that mindfulness meditation — a practice that encourages focusing attention on the present moment — can ease emotional stress. And evidence is mounting that mindfulness also may have key benefits for your physical health — from lowering blood pressure to helping curb addiction. But a new study conducted by researchers working in Wisconsin, Spain and France shows that mindfulness can even affect your genes. Specifically, the study shows that mindfulness can limit the "expression" of genes associated with inflammation.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Influenza vaccination rates up; goal not met in asthmatics
Medscape
During the 2010 to 2011 influenza season, 50 percent of people with asthma received the influenza vaccine, according to a report published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Although this number represents an increase from the 36 percent coverage rate just 5 years earlier, it still falls far below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Healthy People 2020 targets for influenza vaccination among people with asthma of 80 percent for children aged 6 months to 17 years and 90 percent for adults aged 18 years and older.
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Diet sodas' glass is half empty
The Wall Street Journal
Joanna Stepka is the soda industry's new nightmare. The 33-year-old Rhode Island resident began drinking Diet Coke in kindergarten, graduating to three cans a day by adulthood. She quit in August after her gym trainer told her artificial sweeteners are unhealthy and make people fat even if they don't have calories. "I thought it was a win-win, but after learning about the chemicals, definitely not," says Stepka, a parenting lifestyle blogger.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Why HealthCare.gov should have been a mobile app
By Alex Bratton
Of all the problems with the HealthCare.gov site, perhaps the most baffling is why it was created as a website in the first place. The main target of the HealthCare.gov website is young, healthy millennials, those aged 18-29 years old.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Obamacare Medicare Part D works, but critics call plan wasteful
U.S. News & World Report
It seems everyday there are reports on the latest glitch associated with the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. But word from a government agency is that seniors enrolled in the Medicare Part D portion of Obamacare are saving billions.

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Health insurance exchanges: What you need to know before you buy
Forbes
Scott Kraft, a 40-year-old marathon enthusiast, spent more than a decade covering healthcare policy in the Washington, D.C., area as a reporter before transplanting to Portland, Ore., a few months ago.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Cancer charity gives patients wacky makeovers
news.com.au via Fox News
A French cancer charity found a remarkable — and hilarious — way for sufferers to forget their illness. The Mimi Foundation gave 20 people with the disease flamboyant makeovers. By placing a photographer behind a two-way mirror they asked the makeover subjects to close their eyes and then captured their reactions when they opened them and first saw their new look. The results are both inspiring and joyous.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."


Designer immune cells diminish cancer in leukemia patients
Bloomberg Businessweek
Human immune cells reprogrammed in the laboratory to attack leukemia helped drive out the blood cancer in adults and children with aggressive forms of the disease, according to studies on the new strategy. The research, reported at the American Society of Hematology's annual meeting in New Orleans, showed that 15 of 32 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia experienced a reduction of their cancers and seven achieved remission.
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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Group therapy may help ease social anxiety disorder
Reuters
Talk therapy conducted in groups could help people with social anxiety disorder, according to a new review of past studies. So-called cognitive behavioral therapy hinges on helping people change their thoughts and perceptions related to certain situations. It is already used to treat panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and depression, among other conditions.
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3 foods linked with depression
LiveScience
It's no secret that we tend to eat a little more around the holidays. And with all the hustle and bustle of the season, many of us have trouble finding time to make healthy choices. That may be why it's nearly impossible to secure a treadmill at the gym in January — our resolutions are a reflection of our guilt. We know why we tend to eat poorly. But could our food choices be leading to something other than an expanding waistline?
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FDA approves new hepatitis C treatment (Healthline)
Feds: HealthCare.gov 'night and day' from October (NBC News)
FDA approves Varithena injectable foam for treating varicose veins (Healio)
Circumcisions to help prevent AIDS are on the rise (The New York Times)
Study: Energy drinks increase heart contractions (CBS News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 
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