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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

Click here to check out the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD available for purchase now!


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Lung Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

Be sure to check out the study results of Verinata's Non-Invasive Prenatal Technology. Click here to view the press release.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS
Click Here to visit the Population Health Management Institute

US says 15,000 healthcare enrollments didn't get to insurers
Bloomberg
The government failed to send data to health insurers for about 15,000 people who enrolled in Obamacare through early December, an error corrected before it could jeopardize their coverage, the U.S. said. The percentage of enrollments that aren't transmitted to insurers, a process known as an "834 transaction" is now close to zero, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a report.
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Doctors: How to get a handle on your finances in 2014
By Karen Childress
Have you resolved, year after year, to take control of your financial life? Working in the healthcare field keeps physicians busy year-round and leaves little time to assess your money affairs. If 2014 is the year you'd like to actually follow through with that resolution, set aside some time to answer the following questions to jump-start the process. If you have a spouse or partner, work through the questions together.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Shrinking hospital networks greet healthcare shoppers on exchanges
The Wall Street Journal
Joy Houng is shopping for health insurance for next year. Her biggest priority right now is to find a plan that covers her monthly visits to specialists at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. So far, she has found one plan that includes Cedars-Sinai — but it doesn't cover other services that she needs. "I want to be treated by the same doctors I've been seeing for years," said Houng, a 27-year-old project manager in Sherman Oaks, Calif., who is being treated for chronic pain.
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Lack of health insurance options frustrates small businesses
The Seattle Times
In 1986, in a garage behind his house, John Lockwood built the first computer-designed kit for assembling a kayak at home. Today, he runs Port Townsend's Pygmy Boats, a leader in the construction of kits for wooden kayaks, canoes and rowboats. Before most people had email, Lockwood figured out how to create a boat with a computer. But what he can't sort out now is why insurance companies have scuttled health insurance exchange for small businesses like his.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS & TECHNOLOGY


FDA advisory committee backs Takeda's vedolizumab for treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease
News-Medical.net
Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., announced that a joint panel of members from the Gastrointestinal Drugs and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committees of the United States Food and Drug Administration voted to recommend approval of Takeda's vedolizumab for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
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Ethicon-Endosurgery HARMONIC FOCUS+ Shears with Adaptive Tissue Technology get FDA OK
Medgadget
Ethicon Endo-Surgery, a J&J firm, received FDA regulatory clearance to bring to market its HARMONIC FOCUS+ Shears with Adaptive Tissue Technology. The technology is designed to assess the tissue in order to adjust the energy level for optimal hemostasis while protecting surrounding tissue from being affected.
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GENOMICS & BIOTECH
Click Here to visit the Genomics, Biotech & Emerging Medical Technology Institute


Can meditation affect your genes?
LiveScience
There's a large and growing body of evidence that psychological stress — the kind experienced by war orphans, caretakers of people with dementia, and men and women with post-traumatic stress disorder — can cause genetic damage. But if psychological stress can cause genetic damage, can stress-relieving activities such as meditation and mindfulness training help reduce genetic damage?
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Could humans live to 500 years old? Scientists believe genetic tweaks could significantly extend our lifespan
Daily Mail
Living to the ripe old age of 500 might be a possibility if the science shown to extend worms' lives can be applied to humans, scientists have said. U.S. researchers tweaked two genetic pathways in the tiny lab worm Caenorhabditis elegans and boosted the creature's lifespan by a factor of five. The research raises the prospect of anti-aging treatments based on genetic interactions, they said.
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PREVENTION & WELLNESS
Click Here to visit the Center for Preventive Health and Lifestyle Medicine


Healthful habits can help induce sleep without the pills
NPR
About one third of American adults say they have problems falling asleep. And prescriptions for sleeping medications are on the rise, with about 4 percent of people using the drugs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But sleep experts say people should exercise caution before deciding to take medication to help them sleep.
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Antibacterial soaps need more study to stay on shelves
Bloomberg Businessweek
Antibacterial soaps would have one year to prove their safety and effectiveness to remain on U.S. store shelves, part of a proposal by regulators to curb overuse of germ-killing chemicals that's spurred 40 years of debate. Two of the chemicals, triclosan and triclocarban, may be linked to hormone imbalances and antibiotic resistance, the Food and Drug Administration said in a statement.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
US says 15,000 healthcare enrollments didn't get to insurers
Bloomberg
The government failed to send data to health insurers for about 15,000 people who enrolled in Obamacare through early December, an error corrected before it could jeopardize their coverage, the U.S. said.

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3 foods linked with depression
LiveScience
It's no secret that we tend to eat a little more around the holidays. And with all the hustle and bustle of the season, many of us have trouble finding time to make healthy choices.

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Diet sodas' glass is half empty
The Wall Street Journal
Joanna Stepka is the soda industry's new nightmare. The 33-year-old Rhode Island resident began drinking Diet Coke in kindergarten, graduating to three cans a day by adulthood.

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ONCOLOGY
Click Here to visit the Oncology Institute


Childhood cancer survivors suffer symptoms in adulthood
Medical News Today
More children are surviving cancer than ever before thanks to advances in treatment and technology. However, for about 70 percent of childhood cancer survivors, the effect of the disease and treatment 30 years later is sufficient to significantly affect their quality of life, according to a a new study led by the University of Florida in the U.S.
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Cancer diagnosis more likely to limit careers for patients from rural areas
ScienceDaily
Compared to their counterparts in cities, cancer patients living in rural areas tend to retire early after being diagnosed, and are less likely to go on paid disability leave while receiving treatment. These are some of the insights drawn from research by Michelle Sowden and colleagues of the University of Vermont in the U.S. to determine if living in a rural or urban area influences the impact of cancer diagnosis on employment.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "cancer."




BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Click Here to visit the Behavioral Health Institute


Mental healthcare after Newtown
MSNBC
There was a flurry of activity on mental health as officials tried to make good on their promise to act after the Newtown school massacre. Vice President Joe Biden announced that the White House would devote $100 million to increasing access to mental health services, funding community health centers and services in rural areas.
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ADHD: About 1 in 5 adults may have a disorder usually associated with grade school
The Washington Post
Chris Ecarius had so much difficulty filling out his Social Security application online that the 62-year-old went to a doctor to find out why his brain didn't seem to work properly. Over the years, he'd seen other doctors about similar struggles. He'd been told that he was depressed, but he didn't feel depressed. This time, Ecarius got a different diagnosis: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a conclusion that seemed more appropriate for a child in grade school than an adult in retirement.
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FAST FACTS
"Genital warts have been closely linked with cervical cancer and can cause problems during pregnancy, according to the Mayo Clinic."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why HealthCare.gov should have been a mobile app (By Alex Bratton)
Health insurance exchanges and the innovator's dilemma — Is the future costovation? (Forbes)
Study: 'Mindfulness' meditation alters gene expression (The Huffington Post)
Clock is ticking: New acetaminophen combo limitations coming soon (By Jason Poquette)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 
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