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As 2014 comes to a close, NAMCP would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the Managed Care eNews a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 6.


Obamacare's next threat: A September surprise
POLITICO
From July 8: Obamacare open enrollment closed March 31. The White House’s Obamacare war room did not. Most state health insurance rates for 2015 are scheduled to be approved by early fall, and most are likely to rise, timing that couldn’t be worse for Democrats already on defense in the midterms. The White House and its allies know they’ve been beaten in every previous round of Obamacare messaging, never more devastatingly than in 2010.
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Who really pays for healthcare? It might surprise you
USA Today
From April 29: Eight million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama said this month. Millions more obtained new coverage through the Medicaid program for the poor. Full implementation of the health law and its wider coverage, new taxes and shifting subsidies have renewed discussions of winners and losers, makers and moochers.
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Dose of measles destroys woman's incurable cancer
Medical News Today
From May 27: In what they describe as a proof of principle study, doctors in the U.S. were able to keep a woman with deadly multiple myeloma — an incurable bone marrow cancer — free of all signs of living cancer cells for over 6 months by giving her just one high dose of measles virus.
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Why health insurance companies are doomed
Fortune
From Oct. 21: Massive political contributions notwithstanding, competition among health systems and pressure to reduce costs will put an end to health insurers as we know them. It’s that time of the year. No, not Halloween, but something almost as scary — open enrollment season. It’s time to choose among the many plans offered through the various health exchanges as part of Obamacare, among the variety of Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans offered by private insurers as part of Medicare, and, for the 62 percent of employees who are have the opportunity, time to sign up for an employer-sponsored health insurance plan.
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US has the worst healthcare? Not by a long shot
Forbes
From July 15: Few complaints about the U.S. healthcare system are as common as the claim that we spend too much on healthcare and get too little for all that spending in return — especially compared to other industrialized nations. A new Commonwealth Fund report is the latest to indict U.S. healthcare. It pegs the American system dead last in a survey of 11 developed countries.
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States meld Medicare and Medicaid
USA Today
From Feb. 18: They are a diverse group of low-income people who are disabled or elderly. Many have multiple chronic illnesses, or are battling depression or substance abuse. Most will need long-term care at some point in their lives. In the nearly 50 years since Medicaid and Medicare were enacted, the two healthcare programs — one for the poor and the other for the elderly and disabled — have remained separate, with different rules, duplicative benefits and conflicting financial incentives.
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Experts: Ebola transmission low, but risk higher for healthcare workers
Fox News
From Oct. 14: After a nurse who cared for the Ebola victim in Dallas tested positive for the disease, questions have arisen as to the protection and training of healthcare workers. Unlike the nursing assistant in Spain who reportedly became infected after touching her face with her protective glove, the Texas healthcare worker — who is said to have worn full personal protective equipment — has said she doesn’t know how she contracted the disease.
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Why improving access to healthcare does not save money
The New York Times
From July 15: One of the oft-repeated arguments in favor of the Affordable Care Act is that it will reduce people's need for more intensive care by increasing their access to preventive care. For example, people will use the emergency room less often because they will be able to see primary care physicians. Or, they will not develop as many chronic illnesses because they will be properly screened and treated early on. And they will not require significant and invasive care down the line because they will be better managed ahead of time.
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Millions trapped in health law coverage gap
The Wall Street Journal
From Feb. 11: Ernest Maiden was dumbfounded to learn that he falls through the cracks of the healthcare law because in a typical week he earns about $200 from the Happiness and Hair Beauty and Barber Salon. Like millions of other Americans caught in a mismatch of state and federal rules, the 57-year-old hair stylist doesn't make enough money to qualify for federal subsidies to buy health insurance.
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New health plans' limitations anger enrollees
USA Today
From July 29: Nancy Pippenger and Marcia Perez live thousands of miles apart but have the same complaint: Doctors who treated them last year won't take their insurance now, even though they haven't changed insurers. "They said, 'We take the old plan, but not the new one,'" says Perez, an attorney in Palo Alto, California.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The other reason canned food is raising your blood pressure (TIME)
Healthcare law is not one-size-fits-all, and here's why (The New York Times)
'60 Minutes' cancer doctor's revolutionary idea: Taking big data seriously (Forbes)
5 key changes providers can expect from the new ACO rule proposal (Healthcare Dive)
Why millennials hate their least expensive healthcare option (TIME)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 
Managed Care eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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