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FITNESS & WELLNESS


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The super-short workout and other fitness trends
The New York Times
The big story in exercise science this year was the super-short workout. In one particularly useful study from May, scientists found that three brief sessions per day of interval-style exercise — consisting of one minute of brisk walking followed by another minute of strolling, repeated six times — allowed people at risk of diabetes to control their blood sugar better than a continuous 30-minute walk.
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Breaking the link: Exercise and weight loss
The Huffington Post
Let's address a common myth about exercise and weight loss. Myth: Just be more physically active, exercise a great deal, and you will lose all your desired weight.
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This is your brain on exercise
TIME
We all know the slew of physical benefits that come along with staying active. From a healthier heart to stronger muscles, it’s no surprise that the CDC recommends adults get at least two and a half hours of moderate cardio and two days of muscle strengthening every week. But the perks of exercise extend far beyond the body. It turns out, there’s also a long list of mental benefits of breaking a sweat.
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DIET & NUTRITION


Study: Bowl of oatmeal a day may be key to a longer life
ABC News
Eating a small bowl of oatmeal may be the secret to a longer life, a large new study suggests. Harvard University researchers reviewed two large studies that followed more than 100,000 people who were periodically quizzed about what they ate and how they lived for more than 14 years.
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What makes a healthy diet?
Yahoo News
A healthy diet doesn't require a lot of money or newfangled appliances or subsisting on any kind of scheme that sounds like a gimmick. Because it's true what they say about what seems too good to be true: Eating well means listening to that little voice inside that knows what healthy foods generally look like — fresh and recognizable in nature — and what they don't — prepackaged and processed.
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Guide for healthy eating may consider environment
The Associated Press via Fox News
The government issues dietary guidelines every five years to encourage Americans to eat healthier. This year's version may look at what is healthy for the environment, too. A new focus on the environment would mean asking people to choose more fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and other plant-based foods — possibly at the expense of meat.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Report: Binge drinking kills 6 a day — and most are men
USA Today
About six times every day, someone in the United States dies of alcohol poisoning after drinking too much in a single binge, a new report says. The report, from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says an estimated 2,221 people older than 15 died of alcohol poisoning each year from 2010 to 2012.
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Going dry: The benefits of a month without booze
NPR
As New Year's resolutions go, cutting back on food and drink are right at the top of the list. And while those vowing to change their eating habits may cut the carbohydrates or say a sweet goodbye to sugar, for regular drinkers, the tradition may involve what's known as a "dry January" — giving up booze for a month. But could such a short-term breakup with alcohol really impart any measurable health benefits?
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Study finds that eating whole grains can help you live longer
Los Angeles Times
Despite the popularity of such grain-eschewing diets as the Paleo and the gluten-free craze, a new study has found that people who eat a whole grain-rich diet live longer. In fact, eating more whole grains may decrease people’s risk of death by up to 15 percent, particularly from heart disease, according to a large new long-term study from the Harvard School of Public Health.
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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Study: This pill can trick the body into losing weight
TIME
We live in an age where, at any given time, we’re within reasonable range of a chocolate glazed donut. In the face of such temptation, who wouldn’t love to pop a pill to help undo the damage of giving in? Diet pills that are effective and safe have long been elusive, but a new trial on mice published in the journal Nature Medicine suggests a new kind of diet pill might someday have a place in our cabinets.
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What vitamins to take, what to skip and how to know the difference
Gizmodo
Wandering into any conversation about vitamins and other health supplements is wandering into a thicket of hyperbole and half-truths. We're here to cut through some it in the $28 billion supplements industry. The biggest fallacy we need to let go of is that all vitamins are good, and more vitamins is always better. Vitamins are potent chemicals packed in potent pills.
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Are vitamins worth it?
Fox News via KTVI-TV
Take your vitamins to stay healthy right? Maybe not. Some say vitamins are taking a toll on wallets and they might not deliver what you need. Americans spend $28 billion every year on a gazillion different vitamin pills. Registered dietitian Kristen Carlucci recommends different supplements for different clients, depending on their different diets and lifestyles.
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FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."


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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Run to stay young (The New York Times)
The anti-inflammation diet: 13 tips to improve your health (Fox News)
Triggers that sabotage weight-loss efforts: Circumstantial triggers (By Annette Radvansky)
Diet vs. exercise debate depends on the difference between weight loss and weight management (Medical Daily)
Everything you think you know about vitamins is wrong (Business Insider)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 

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