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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jan. 22, 2014

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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Recognizing Our Corporate Members

Abbott Laboratories
Central Care Center (C3/Welldyne)
Mediterranean Wellness

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 


FITNESS & WELLNESS

Shoring up those fitness resolutions
The New York Times
January is the cruelest month, at least for those with good intentions to get fit. According to recent analyses of decades' worth of exercise studies, many new exercise "intenders" will abandon their workout routines within two weeks of their New Year's resolutions, and about half will quit by June. Even longtime exercisers feel the pull of physical entropy. In any given year, around a quarter of the people who had been working out dutifully will stop.
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Fitness myth busters: 'No pain, no gain'
Philly.com
"No pain, no gain." Whoever came up with this horrific adage deserves to be punched square in their six-pack, oiled up gut. Unless you are a masochist, this expression often causes anyone inspired to adapt a fitness routine to commence exercise by running for the hills, choking down Krispy Kremes along the way.
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'Biggest Loser's' Jillian Michaels ramps up fitness routine
Reuters
As Jillian Michaels, the tough-love trainer on NBC's hit reality show "The Biggest Loser," lunges towards her middle years she infuses her fitness routine with the same take-no-prisoners mindset that impels her TV contestants to shape up. The Los Angeles-based trainer, who turns 40 next month, is determined to fight, rather than embrace, that milestone.
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DIET & NUTRITION


The get lean for life diet
Men's Fitness
Late-night infomercials have you thinking that losing fat is either super easy or way too hard. One guru says you can tighten your abs in just minutes a day, while another orders you to run till you puke. Here's the truth: It's not easy, but it also isn't torture. Dieting can't be misery — when it is, people don't stick with it, and then they fail.
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Study: Heavier dieters using diet drinks should look at food too
Los Angeles Times
Overweight and obese adults who use diet drinks to help them lose weight need to take another look at the food they eat, according to researchers who reported that those people ate more food calories than overweight people who drank sugar-sweetened beverages. The scientists writing in the American Journal of Public Health did not say the dieters should give up on no- and low-calorie drinks; rather, they said the dieters should look at what else they're consuming, especially sweet snacks, to find other ways to modify their diets.
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Researchers: Popular blood type diet claims are 'not valid'
Medical News Today
People around the world are familiar with the blood type diet, a lifestyle plan instructing followers to eat and exercise in certain ways, depending on their blood type. But new research debunks the claims made by creator Peter D'Adamo, suggesting an individual's nutritional needs do not actually vary by blood type.
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Study: High-protein diets, like the popular Dr. Dukan Diet, increase the risk of developing kidney disease in rats
ScienceDaily
An experiment done in rats by scientists at the University of Granada, Spain, shows a high-protein diet increases the chance of developing kidney stones and other renal diseases. High-protein diets, like the popular Dr. Dukan diet, increase the long-term risk of developing kidney disease and have a negative effect on renal urinary and morphological markers, the study suggests.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Shoring up those fitness resolutions
The New York Times
January is the cruelest month, at least for those with good intentions to get fit. According to recent analyses of decades' worth of exercise studies, many new exercise "intenders" will abandon their workout routines within two weeks of their New Year's resolutions.

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Learn 1 perfect exercise that can supplement your workout
The Dallas Morning News
Gotta love January. Beguiling and bewitching, she beckons with possibilities of fitness, of health, of habits broken and of others made.

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7 ways to keep alcohol from wrecking your diet
Health.com via CNN
Over the years, many of my clients have confided that too many cocktails on the weekend, followed by alcohol-induced overeating, cancels out their work-week healthy eating efforts.

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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Experts: Vitamin supplements make sense for some
USA Today
Multivitamins and other supplements are not all-purpose elixirs of health: Most studies suggest they don't play a big role in preventing chronic illnesses or extending lives. One recent medical journal editorial called them a flat out waste of money for most consumers. But even the doctors who wrote that editorial, in the Annals of Internal Medicine, said there are exceptions.
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Researchers: Not all vitamin supplements are safe
Health Newsline
Popping a vitamin pill is believed to be the simplest way to do away with the deficits of a balanced diet. Besides acting as an elixir for good health, multivitamin supplements promise a ravishing outward beauty. But do these vitamin supplements actually bestow what they promise? Most studies say no.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Sleep during the day may throw genes into disarray
HealthDay News via WebMD
Sleeping during the day — a necessity for jet-lagged travelers and those who work overnight shifts — disrupts the rhythms of about one-third of your genes, a new study suggests. What's more, shifted sleep appears to disrupt gene activity even more than not getting enough sleep, according to the research.
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Happiness may slow aging, improve health
LiveScience via Fox News
Being healthy can make a person happy, but happiness itself may also lead to better health, according to a new study. Researchers found that people who enjoy life tend to maintain better physical function than those who don't in daily activities as they age. The study included more than 3,000 people age 60 and older living in England, and followed them for eight years.
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FAST FACTS
"Whooping cough is very contagious and can cause serious illness in infants, children and adults, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nutritionists rank the best diets of 2014 (The Boston Globe)
Study: Exercise could help you maintain work-life balance (The Huffington Post)
Vitamins can help prevent heart attacks (The Huffington Post)
Vitamin supplements could be altering your DNA (Care2)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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