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FITNESS & WELLNESS


The best workout for weight loss
TIME
Everyone knows that cardio exercise — by way of a bike ride or a sprint — is key to weight loss. But a high-intensity cardio workout may do a better job of decreasing blood sugar levels than lower intensity exercise, according to a new study in Annals of Internal Medicine. The study assigned 300 obese people to a group: one that exercised with low intensity for long periods of time or another that engaged in high-intensity workouts for short durations.
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Walk a little faster to get the most out of your exercise time
NPR
Some people have no problem fitting regular aerobic exercise into their lives. The rest of us want to know how much we have to exercise to see health benefits. Now we have some answers: You may want to go just a tad longer and harder than you'd thought. Current government guidelines advise adults to get the equivalent of at least 2 1/2 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of higher-intensity exercise every week, plus some strength training. In effect, those guidelines say there's no particular benefit from working out harder, other than saving time.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Why mindfulness may or may not jump-start your exercise routine
Forbes
Mindfulness is at risk of being oversold. When research of at best questionable relevance gets enthusiastic media treatment well in excess of what the actual data affords, especially when the coverage includes specific advice, it is time to take a step back, a big step. That is currently the situation with mindfulness and exercise. While mindfulness just may “jump-start your exercise routine,” as the “Well” blog at the Times as well as Glamour, Esquire and other places around the blogosphere trumpeted, it also may not.
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DIET & NUTRITION


The 50 healthiest foods of all time
TIME
Eating healthy shouldn’t be complicated. To make it simple, TIME has curated a list of the 50 healthiest foods you should be eating now. They asked registered dietitian Tina Ruggiero, author of the The Truly Healthy Family Cookbook, to break down why each of these foods is a powerhouse.
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Distorting nutrition facts to generate buzz
The Huffington Post
In mid-February, the government released a scientific report that will shape its 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Think of it as America's basic nutrition policy. Most people who read the report would have viewed it as a snore; not much has changed. Yes, the report lifted the longstanding advice to limit cholesterol in foods.
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9 foods that keep you feeling full longer
The Huffington Post
Sticking to a low-calorie diet in an effort to lose weight immediately presents one big challenge: hunger. When you’re hungry you’ll grab the quickest food within reach and forget all your good intentions. It’s one reason why only one out of five people can last a month before falling off the diet wagon, according to a British survey.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Researchers: Treadmill performance predicts risk of death
Fox News
Cardiologists at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have devised a formula that estimates an individual’s risk of dying based on their ability to exercise on a treadmill. In a new study published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers analyzed data from 58,000 heart stress tests and created an algorithm to gauge mortality risk over a decade based solely on treadmill exercise performance.
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Healthy diet linked to lung health
Reuters
Among its many rewards, eating a healthy diet might help protect against the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, according to a new study. Based on more than 120,000 men and women followed for more than a decade, researchers calculate that those who ate a diet highest in whole grains, vegetables and nuts, and lowest in red meats and sugars were up to a third less likely to develop COPD — even if they smoked — than those who ate the worst diet.
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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Vitamin-packed with promises
The New York Times
In the late 1800s a disfiguring and often fatal disease became epidemic in the South. Called pellagra, it caused diarrhea, mental confusion, and severe scaling and flaking of the skin. By 1911, pellagra had become the leading cause of death in asylums. Eventually, the Public Health Service dispatched the physician Joseph Goldberger to determine its cause.
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Study on B vitamins and dementia slammed
PsychCentral
A study published last year claiming that B vitamins play no role in preventing dementia is coming under sharp criticism. Medical experts are concerned that patients who are in the earliest stages of dementia could miss out on a potentially effective treatment if they follow the research which they say is misleading.
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